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Beyond the plain language edit

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  1. Beyond the plain language edit • Editors’ Association of Canada conference • June 7, 2014 • Tracy Torchetti and Claire Foley

  2. Agenda • Introduction • Audience • Plain language • Punctuation • Verbs • Exercise • Readability • Conclusion

  3. Canadian literacy statistics • 42% of adult Canadians have low literacy skills. • More than 15 million Canadian adults will have low literacy skills by 2031, up 25% from 2001.

  4. Canadian diversity • 17% of the Canadian population are immigrants. • 32% of Canadians don’t have English as a first language.

  5. What is plain language? • the art and science of writing clearly • clear organization and layout • reader-centred writing and design

  6. Writing techniques • Use the active voice. • Write directly to your reader. • Use a positive tone wherever possible. • Use short words and simple sentences. • Use common words instead of jargon. • Use lists.

  7. Formatting and style • Watch alignment. • Use lots of white space and short paragraphs. • Keep lines of text short. • Use meaningful titles, headings and subheadings. • Use minimal emphasis (bold, all caps, italics, colour). • Choose the right font.

  8. Clean presentation • Use layout to make the information easy to find and use. • Use visuals to make concepts easier to understand. • For online information: • limit the number of levels • avoid too much information on a page • make links easy to see and understand

  9. Accessibility • audiences with different abilities • AODA compliance • web accessibility standards (WCAG 2.0)

  10. Punctuation • Use minimal punctuation. • Good punctuation still matters!

  11. Fussy marks • colon (:) • semicolon (;) • asterisk (*) • ellipsis (…) • footnote symbols

  12. Bulleted lists Before Offer lots of high fibre foods, including: • breads, cereals, pastas and rice made from whole grains; • fruit, especially berries, dried fruit and citrus fruit; and • vegetables, especially broccoli, carrots, corn and leafy greens.

  13. Bulleted lists After Offer lots of high fibre foods, including: • breads, cereals, pastas and rice made from whole grains • fruit, especially berries, dried fruit and citrus fruit • vegetables, especially broccoli, carrots, corn and leafy greens

  14. Parentheses Good You need to take a different drug for your diabetes (starting Monday). Better You need to take a different drug for your diabetes. You start the new drug on Monday.

  15. The ESL perspective • contractions • verb tenses • idioms • phrasal verbs

  16. Contractions Some contractions are easier than others. Easier I’m, can’t, don’t, you’re, who’s, what’s, where’s Harder could’ve, will’ve, shouldn’t, isn’t, aren’t, weren’t, doesn’t, didn’t

  17. Verb tenses Use more common verb tenses. • Simple present tense You have diabetes. • Present continuous Are you taking medication?

  18. Verb tenses Use more common verb tenses. • Simple future You will go to the hospital tomorrow. You are going to the hospital tomorrow. • Simple past Did you take medication yesterday?

  19. Verb tenses The present works for both present and future situations. Examples I take my medication at noon today. I take my new medication tomorrow.

  20. Verb tenses The present works for both present and future situations. Before When you go to the hospital, the doctor will take your blood and will do other tests. After When you go to the hospital, the doctor takes your blood and does other tests.

  21. Verb tenses Use the present instead of present continuous. Before I am taking medication for my heart. After I take medication for my heart every day.

  22. Verb tenses Use will or be going to for the future. Examples I am going to have my procedure at the hospital next week. I will have my procedure at the hospital next week. (I have my procedure at the hospital next week.) .

  23. Verb tenses Use regular verbs in the past. Examples I talked to the doctor yesterday. I spoke to the doctor yesterday.

  24. Idioms • Are you feeling under the weather? • You seem on the ball. • This will cost an arm and a leg. • Let’s get the ball rolling! • Keep an eye out for these symptoms.

  25. Phrasal verbs A phrasal verb is a verb followed by a preposition or an adverb. The combination creates a meaning different from the original verb.

  26. Phrasal verbs take over put off work out call off check out cut out cut down on end up rule out figure out go on get over

  27. Exercise

  28. Readability best practices • Know your audience • Print (average: grade 8) • Web (average: grade 6 to 8) • Context • Subject matter • Testing

  29. Readability formulas • SMOG, or Simplified Measure of Gobbledygook • Fry Readability Formula • Gunning-Fog Index • FleschReading Ease and Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level • New Dale–Chall Readability Formula • readability-score.com • specially designed software, such as Readability Calculations, Readability Plus, Readability Studio • checklists, such as SAM (Suitability Assessment of Materials)

  30. What formulas get wrong Examples Dr. Smith said I should call if my child has a temperature of 100.2. The order of words doesn’t matter at all. All at matter doesn’t words of order the.

  31. Benefits of reading formulas • They’re objective and easy to use. • The scores get people’s attention. • They show improvements that result from editing.

  32. Conclusion • Know your audience. • Apply plain language principles. • Learn more about literacy. • Think about the second language perspective.

  33. Questions? • Claire Foley CFproofreading@hotmail.ca • @thecrimpqueen • Tracy Torchettitracy.torchetti@cancer.ca • @torcherama