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National Capacity-Building Workshop on the Implementation of the Convention for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage Reiko YOSHIDA Intangible Cultural Heritage Section UNESCO Maputo, Mozambique 19-20 September 2008. UNESCO INTANGIBLE HERITAGE SECTION. UNESCO.

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National Capacity-Building Workshop

on the Implementation of the

Convention for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage

Reiko YOSHIDA

Intangible Cultural Heritage Section

UNESCO

Maputo, Mozambique

19-20 September 2008

UNESCO

INTANGIBLE

HERITAGE

SECTION


Unesco l.jpg
UNESCO

  • UNESCO: founded November 1945

  • Paris based, under control of permanent delegations; some 45 field offices

  • Mandate: contributing to international cooperation, and bridging gaps,

    in the fields of Education, Sciences, Culture and Communication,

    as a laboratory of ideas, standard setter, clearing house and capacity builder


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I tenori, Italy

Heritage: from outstanding monuments to collective traditions and expressions


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Early development of cultural heritage policies within UNESCO

  • 1966—the Declaration on the Principles of International Cultural Cooperation

    “each culture has a dignity and value which must be respected and preserved, and that every people has the right and duty to develop its culture and that all cultures form part of the common heritage belonging to all mankind.”

Devastations by WWII

Development of policies

for cultural heritage

Monuments confirm the

promoted past

The effort—

concentrated

on the tangible aspects

of the cultural heritage

Birth of the Convention concerning the

Protection of the World Cultural and

Natural Heritage


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Early development of cultural heritage policies within UNESCO (cont’d)

  • 1960/70s: Dominant & non-dominant communities turn to living heritage for confirmation of present-day identities

  • 1970/80s: Harmonious development of communities asks for balanced management of – new term -ICH

  • 1982, the World Conference on Cultural policies Mondiacult (Mexico city)

    “The cultural heritage of a people includes the works of its artists, architects, musicians, writers and scientists and also the work of anonymous artists, expressions of the people’s spirituality, and the body of values which give meaning to life. It includes both tangible and intangible works through which the creativity of that people finds expression: languages, rites, historic places and monuments, literature, works of art, archives and libraries.”


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Early development of cultural heritage policies within UNESCO (cont’d)

  • Did not meet expected results due to…

  • Its non-binding character

  • Absence of funds, too much focus on documentation and research, not enough involvement of practitioners

1989 Recommendation on the Safeguarding of Traditional Culture and Folklore

  • 1998—Proclamation of Masterpieces of the Oral and Intangible Heritage of Humanity

  • Feasibility study—concluded that a new legal instrument is necessary

2003 –the Convention for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage


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The Culture Sector UNESCO (cont’d)

Core functions:

  • Advocacy

  • Normative

  • Clearing house

  • Capacity building

  • International cooperation

  • Programmes:

    • World Heritage

    • Intangible Heritage

    • Museums and cultural objects

    • Cultural policies

    • Cultural industries

      2008-2009:

  • Biennial sectoral priority 1: promoting cultural diversity through the safeguarding of heritage in its various dimensions and the enhancement of cultural expressions

  • Biennial sectoral priority 2: Promoting social cohesion, by fostering pluralism, dialogue of cultures and the establishment of a culture of peace

  • Kabuki, Japan


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    UNESCO Conventions and cultural diversity UNESCO (cont’d)

    • 1954: Convention for the Protection of Cultural Properties in the Event of Armed Conflict

    • 1970: Convention on the Means of Prohibiting and Preventing the Illicit Import, Export and Transfer of Ownership of Cultural Property

    • 1972: Convention on the Protection of the World Cultural and Natural Heritage

    • 2001: Convention on the Protection of the Underwater Cultural Heritage

    • 2003: Convention for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage (ICH)

    • 2005: Convention on the Protection and Promotion of the Diversity of Cultural Expressions


    Proclamation of masterpieces of the oral and intangible heritage of humanity l.jpg
    Proclamation of Masterpieces of the Oral and Intangible Heritage of Humanity

    • Created in 1997

    • Proclamations in 2001, 2003, 2005

    • 90 Masterpieces have been proclaimed in all

    • No new Proclamations will be organised

    • Masterpieces located in States Parties to the Convention will be inscribed in the List of the Convention in Nov. 2008

    Zápara People, Ecuador-Peru


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    The ICH Convention Heritage of Humanity

    • Adopted: October 2003

    • Open for ratification since November 2003

    • Ratified by 30 States: 20 January 2006

    • Entered into force: 20 April 2006

    • Ratified now by 101 States

    The Al-Sirah Al-Hilaliyyah Epic, Egypt

    Vietnamese Court Music

    Nha Nhac

    The Cultural Space of Sosso-Bala in Nyagassola, Guinea


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    Defining ICH: Heritage of Humanity

    Expressions and practices, knowledge and skills that

    • are recognised by communities, groups, and in some cases individuals, as forming part of their cultural heritage

    • are living, transmitted from generation to generation and constantly recreated

    • are crucial for the sense of identity and continuity of communities and groups

    • are in conformity with human rights (+ sustainable development)

      The definition also includes objects and spaces that are associated with manifestations of ICH


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    Domains Heritage of Humanity

    • Oral traditions and expressions

    • Performing arts

    • Social practices,

      rituals and festive events

    • Knowledge and practices

      concerning nature

      and the universe

    • Traditional craftsmanship

    The Traditional Music of Morin Khuur

    Mongolia


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    Goals Heritage of Humanity

    • Safeguarding ICH: ensuring its viability (continued enactment and transmission) within communities/groups

    • Awareness-raising

    • Sharing and celebrating

    • Dialogue, respect for cultural diversity

    • International cooperation and assistance



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    Role of States Parties Heritage of Humanity

    • Take necessary measures to ensure safeguarding (= ensure the viability of ICH)

    • Identify and define elements of intangible heritage, with participation of communities, groups and NGO’s

    The Garifuna Language,

    Dance and Music,Nicaragua


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    National Safeguarding Measures Heritage of Humanity

    • Inventory making

    • Adopt a general safeguarding policy

      • to promote the function of ITH

      • to integrate safeguarding into planning programmes

    • Establish competent safeguarding bodies

    • Foster studies and research methodologies

    Shashmaqom Music

    Tajikistan - Uzbekistan


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    National Safeguarding Measures (2) Heritage of Humanity

    • Adopt legal, technical, administrative and financial measures:

      • training institutions for intangible heritage management and transmission

      • ensure access to intangible cultural heritage with respect to customary practices

      • establish documentation institutions

    The Gbofe of Afounkaha:

    the Music of the Transverse trumpets and the cultural space of the Tagbana Community

    Côte d'Ivoire


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    Education, awareness-raising, Heritage of Humanitycapacity building

    • ensure recognition of and respect for intangible heritage

    • inform the public of dangers threatening intangible cultural heritage

    • promote education for protection of natural spaces and places of memory

    Gbofe of Afounkaha: the Music of the Transverse trumpets

    and the cultural space of the Tagbana Community, Côte d'Ivoire


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    Obligations of States Parties Heritage of HumanityICH inventory(ies)

    States Parties are committed to safeguarding the ICH present on their territory, starting by its identification, leading to one or more inventories.

    • Community, groups to be involved

    • Access to be regulated

    • To be regularly updated

    • To be spoken about tomorrow


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    Mechanism of the Convention Heritage of Humanity

    • General Assembly of States Parties

    • Intergovernmental Committee for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage

    • Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity

    • List of Intangible Cultural Heritage in Need of Urgent Safeguarding

    • Practices reflecting the principles and objectives of the Convention

    • Fund for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage

    • International assistance and cooperation


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    General Assembly Heritage of Humanity

    • Sovereign Body of the Convention

    • Ordinary session every two years, and in extraordinary sessions

    • Elects the members of the Committee

    • Approves the Operational

      Directives for the

      implementation of the

      Convention

    • 27-29 June 2006: 1 GA

    • 9 November: 1 EXT GA

    • 16-19 June 2008: 2 GA

    The Al-Sirah Al-Hilaliyyah Epic, Egypt


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    Intergovernmental Committee Heritage of Humanity

    • 24 Members

    • 4-year term, renewal of half of the members every 2 years

    • Membership: determined by equitable geographical representation and rotation

    • Members to send experts as their

      representatives

    • Algeria: 1 COM (Nov.2006)

    • China: 1 EXT COM (May 2007)

    • Japan: 2 COM (Sept. 2007)

    • Bulgaria: 2 EXT COM

      (Febr. 2008)

    • Istanbul: 3COM

      (Nov. 2008)

    The Art of Akyns, Kyrgyz Epic Tellers Kyrgyzstan


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    Functions of the Committee Heritage of Humanity

    • Prepare Operational Directives for implementation

    • Implement the Convention

      • Examine requests for:

        • inscription on the Lists

        • Article 18

        • international assistance

      • Make recommendations on safeguarding measures

      • Seek means of increasing its resources

      • Examine periodic reports of States Parties

    The Pansori Epic Chant

    Republic of Korea


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    Intergovernmental Committee Heritage of Humanitycomposed of 24 members

    • Group I: Cyprus, Italy, Turkey

    • Group II: Belarus, Croatia, Estonia, Hungry

    • Group III: Cuba, Mexico, Paraguay, Peru,

    • Zenezuela

    • Group IV: India, Republic of Korea, Viet Nam

    • Group V (a): Central African Republic,

    • Gabon, Kenya, Mail, Niger,

    • Zimbabwe

    • Group V (b): Jordan, Oman, United Arab

    • Emirates


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    The Lists Heritage of Humanity

    • Representative List of the ICH of

      Humanity

    • List of the ICH in Need of Urgent Safeguarding

    Criteria for inscription

    • Prepared by the Committee

    • Adopted by the General

      Assembly in June 2008

    The Garifuna Language,

    Dance and Music,Belize, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua


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    Criteria Heritage of Humanity

    Criteria and nomination procedure have been approved by the General Assembly in June 2008


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    International Assistance (Tokyo, September 2007): Heritage of Humanity

    Safeguarding of heritage inscribed on the Urgent Safeguarding List

    Preparation of inventories

    Programmes, projects and other activities in the States Parties (incl. capacity building)

    Preparatory assistance

    The Fund: International Assistance

    Congos of Villa Mella

    Dominican Republic


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    Features of the Convention Heritage of Humanity

    • Introduces a list system for visibility and safeguarding; other main focus on programmes and projects

    • Deals with heritage representative for communities (not of outstanding universal value)

    • Emphasis on living heritage, enacted by people, often collectively, mostly transmitted orally

    • Attention for processes/conditions rather than products

    • Role of communities/groups

    • Contribution to promotion of creativity and diversity, to well-being (of communities and groups and societies at large) and peaceful development


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    101 ratification as of 1 September 2008 Heritage of Humanity

    Algeria

    Mauritius

    Japan

    Gabon

    Panama

    China

    Central African Rep.

    Latvia

    Lithuania

    Belarus

    Republic of Korea

    Seychelles

    Syria

    United Arab Emirates

    Mali

    Mongolia

    Croatia

    Egypt

    Oman

    Dominica

    India

    Viet Nam

    Peru

    Pakistan

    Bhutan

    Nigeria

    Iceland

    Mexico

    Senegal

    Romania

    Estonia

    Luxembourg

    Nicaragua

    Cyprus

    Ethiopia

    Bolivia

    Brazil

    Bulgaria

    Hungary

    Iran

    Belgium

    Jordan

    Slovakia

    Moldova

    Turkey

    Madagascar

    Albania

    Zambia

    Armeria

    Zimbabwe

    Cambodia

    The former

    Yugoslav Rep. of Macedonia

    Morocco

    France

    Cote d’Ivoire

    Burkina Faso

    Honduras

    Tunisia

    Sao Tome and Principe

    Argentina

    Philippines

    Burundi

    Paraguay

    Dominican Republic

    Spain

    Kyrguzstan

    Mauritania

    Greece

    Lebanon

    Norway

    Azerbaijan

    Saint Lucia

    Costa Rica

    Venezuela

    Niger

    Cuba

    Monaco

    Djibouti

    Namibia

    Yemen

    Indonesia

    Mozambique

    Kenya

    Italy

    Belize

    Saudi Arabia

    Uzbekistan

    Ecuador

    Guinea

    Georgia

    Colombia

    Sri Lanka

    Portugal

    Ukraine

    Chad

    Sudan

    Switzerland

    Lesotho

    Qatar

    ….


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    UNESCO Heritage of Humanity

    INTANGIBLE HERITAGE SECTION

    1, rue Miollis

    75732 Paris Cedex 15

    France

    E-mail: r.yoshida@unesco.org

    Tel: 00 33 (0) 1456 84124

    Fax: 00 33 (0) 1456 85752

    r.yoshida@unesco.org

    www.unesco.org/culture/ich

    UNESCO

    INTANGIBLE

    HERITAGE

    SECTION



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    Definitions: article 2 Heritage of Humanity

    The “intangible cultural heritage” means the practices, representations, expressions, knowledge, skills – as well as the instruments, objects, artefacts and cultural spaces associated therewith – that communities, groups and, in some cases, individuals recognize as part of their cultural heritage.

    This intangible cultural heritage, transmitted from generation to generation, is constantly recreated by communities and groups in response to their environment, their interaction with nature and their history, and provides them with a sense of identity and continuity, thus promoting respect for cultural diversity and human creativity.

    For the purposes of this Convention, consideration will be given solely to such intangible cultural heritage as is compatible with existing international human rights instruments, as well as with the requirements of mutual respect among communities, groups and individuals, and of sustainable development.


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    Key points Heritage of Humanity

    • Intangible heritage gives us an opportunity to celebrate aspects of heritage (practices, ideas) that were not included in the traditional western model of great buildings and artworks

    • It is not separate from ‘tangible’ heritage, as it can include the meanings associated with material objects and places. World Heritage Convention could cover places that are significant for their ICH.

    • Definitions of intangible heritage place great value on the significance of the heritage to communities, groups or individuals who practice that heritage.


    Aspects of heritage value l.jpg
    Aspects of heritage value Heritage of Humanity

    Practising communities

    Social value:a sense of belongingtrust and mutual respectvaluing the group (ubuntu)

    Economic value: community developmenttourism

    Heritage professionals and institutions (e.g. museums)

    Government

    Intrinsic value: engaging with our past

    Adapted from Hewison & Holden 2006


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    Why is ICH important? Heritage of Humanity

    • ICH is important because it provides practising communities with a sense of ‘identity and continuity’ – practising it is a responsibility to the group, and may be integral to its well-being

    • Thus, ICH can, but does not have to be:

      • practiced by everyone, even within a community

      • available to everyone, even within the community

      • known to everyone, outside the community (and layers of knowledge within the community)

      • significant to everyone, outside the community


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    ICH in context Heritage of Humanity

    • ICH is not important just because of the objects, or the rituals themselves, but because of what lies behind them – their meaning for the practicing community over the generations

    • ICH can be used / applied in other cultural contexts, but in so doing it may gain other values (including monetary ones) and other meanings

    • Change and communication between various cultural practices is positive, but so long as we do not lose the core significance of the ICH


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    Domains: article 2 Heritage of Humanity

    • oral traditions and expressions, including language as a vehicle of the intangible cultural heritage;

    • performing arts;

    • social practices, rituals and festive events;

    • knowledge and practices concerning nature and the universe;

    • traditional craftsmanship


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    Inclusions and exclusions Heritage of Humanity

    • Prioritisation generally extended to:

      • ICH threatened by colonisation / political marginalisation

      • ICH threatened by globalisation

      • ICH that reflects national / regional identity

    • Main exclusions:

      • organised religion (but could be included under (d))

      • language (except as a vehicle for ICH)

      • human rights violations (process for decision-making?)

      • environmental non-sustainability (process for decision-making?)


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    Key points Heritage of Humanity

    • The ‘domains’ of the Convention provide a very broad framework for defining ICH at a national level: this provides flexibility for communities to define their ICH.

    • The main problem is deciding what to inventory and what to fund at a national level, and what to list at an international level.

    • Because communities define their own ICH it is better for governments or heritage managers to restrict what gets funded or prioritised for funding rather than what gets defined as ICH.


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    Community Heritage of Humanity

    • Communities are networks of people whose sense of identity or connectedness emerges from a shared historical relationship that is rooted in the practice and transmission of, or engagement with, their ICH;

    • Link between defining heritage, minority identities and land claims

    • Defining the boundaries of communities: recent and political inclusion and exclusion of community members

    • Choosing representatives: the unequal nature of access to knowledge and power within communities


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    Role of the community Heritage of Humanity

    • The practicing community is the key point for heritage recreation. They have to be involved in the inventorying and listing processes, and in heritage management.

    • Who ‘owns’ the heritage and what does ‘ownership’ mean?

    • Who has the right to speak for the community?

    • Who should define its meaning?


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    Safeguarding Measures Heritage of Humanity:Promotion, Documentation, Research, Education, Revitalization


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    SAFEGAURDING ICH Heritage of Humanity

    • Safeguarding of ICH is different to TCH because we are essentially dealing with conserving human knowledge and practice rather than their products.

    • To start we need to come back to the question of definition. What is ICH and what are we safeguarding?


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    Safeguarding Heritage of Humanity

    • The Convention gives domains and Definitions.

    • For Safeguarding measures it is important to remember that the focus of conservation in ICH is the know-how or knowledge rather than the product of the knowledge. Hence ‘ the ‘intangibility’; the focus on 'people' and 'transmission.


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    Safeguarding Heritage of Humanity

    • However safeguarding the know how can also mean the necessity to safeguard places and/or things (materials objects etc…).

      Makonde sculpture (Mozambique/Tanzania)


    Slide46 l.jpg


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    Safeguarding the ICH is lost or distorted, change can be a sign that a culture is vibrant.

    • Within a specific expression of ICH, there are often specific elements of the process which are the important elements to safeguard.

    • Identifying these ‘core’ elements/processes is crucial for safeguarding measures.

      • For a sculpture it may be the specific carving technique, or the choice of material, or the story behind the sculpture, or the ceremony in which the object is to be used, that is the most important element.


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    Safeguarding the ICH is lost or distorted, change can be a sign that a culture is vibrant.

    • Since the focus of heritage safeguarding is the knowledge/practice, the issue of inter-generational transmission is vital in safeguarding measures for all domains of ICH.


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    Threats? the ICH is lost or distorted, change can be a sign that a culture is vibrant.

    What are the main threats?

    They may vary according to

    Types of ICH,

    Specific social,political or economic contexts of concerned communities Global issues


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    Threats? the ICH is lost or distorted, change can be a sign that a culture is vibrant.

    • Some common threats:

      • Lack of income generation can lead to abandonment of certain practices expressions.

      • Loss of political or economic significance of a particular practice due to development, emerging market economy or political structures of nation states

        • ie. Traditional rulers lose their power-base and so no longer prepared to invest in all the ‘hard and expensive work’ for a particular ceremony

      • Lack of valorization or pride in the culture among younger generation


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    Threats? the ICH is lost or distorted, change can be a sign that a culture is vibrant.

    • Education

      • Can have a double negative effect: The time at school means that children are not learning ‘at home’. But also the fact that schools ignore traditional forms of cultural knowledge gives the subliminal message that ‘these are worthless’.

        Yet education also vital for safeguarding

    • Rural to urban, or international migration

      • development and globalization- however also offers opportunities for revitalization when migrants retain and/or adapt cultural forms

    • Spread of world religions or of secular/humanist world views.

      • Sometimes actively opposed to all forms of ICH so converts abandon all practices and destroy objects and artefacts.


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    Threats? the ICH is lost or distorted, change can be a sign that a culture is vibrant.

    • Tourism

      can lead to loss of meaning or form ( folklorization)

      but also can help generate income and revitalization.

    • Wars, extreme poverty, disease.

    • Environmental degradation

      but also certain approaches to environmental conservation which may seek to exclude people from their ancestral lands for the creation of ‘conservation zones.


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    Threats? the ICH is lost or distorted, change can be a sign that a culture is vibrant.

    • The variety of threats highlight the need to take an integrated/holistic approach in the planning of safeguarding measures.

    • One cannot focus on a specific expression as if it exists independently of its social, political, economic or environmental context.

    • Some issues beyond the scope of heritage practitioners however government can identify and mitigate against some of the bigger picture threats


    Safeguarding54 l.jpg
    Safeguarding the ICH is lost or distorted, change can be a sign that a culture is vibrant.

    • Several approaches to the question of safeguarding

      • Specific types of cultural expression (a dance, a crafting technique, a ritual etc, oral expressions etc…) may need different ways of safeguarding.


    Safeguarding55 l.jpg
    Safeguarding the ICH is lost or distorted, change can be a sign that a culture is vibrant.

    • Mechanisms of knowledge transmission may have radically different cultural frameworks- work with those that are appropriate.

      For example the variation in sensitivities surrounding specific cultural expressions and the issue of custodianship (secret knowledge, gender specificities, age-based specificities - ritual initiations)

    • Consider the particular social, economic, political situation of concerned community or practitioner Colonized, at war, food shortage and or extreme poverty,

      peri-urban, prevalence of new religious forms etc…


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    Safeguarding the ICH is lost or distorted, change can be a sign that a culture is vibrant.

    • In General therefore the following actions can be taken in safeguarding ICH:

      Promotion

      Documentation

      Research

      Education

      Revitalization


    Safeguarding57 l.jpg
    Safeguarding the ICH is lost or distorted, change can be a sign that a culture is vibrant.

    • However these may not be equal and the most important is the issue of continuity or revitalization.

      • Promotion, documentation and research should be undertaken with a view to ensuring or assisting the continued practice, the inter-generational transmission of know-how or the revitalization of the concerned cultural expression.


    Slide58 l.jpg


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    Revitalization these activities should feed into actual practice.

    • Revitalization is an important element of safeguarding, and can be encouraged by Governments in a number of ways

      Promotion or Valorization

      Giving recognition to practitioner’s skills and competencies among the larger community, or on national level (ie. Awards, festivals, mass media, etc…).

      People to feel pride in their ICH and through that interest in other’s ICH. May encourage some of the younger generation to make the effort to learn


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    Revitalization these activities should feed into actual practice.

    Setting up of mechanisms for inter-generational transmissions

    specialized training institutions (academies, schools etc…)

    important to work with ‘mainstream’ schools

    collaborations between custodian communities and researchers, heritage specialists or institutions


    Revitalization61 l.jpg
    Revitalization these activities should feed into actual practice.

    • Assisting in income generating activities when appropriate (crafts, performing arts, appropriate forms of tourism)

    • Researchers to share their findings with communities who may wish to revive lost or nearly lost forms of expressions.


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    Documentation and Research these activities should feed into actual practice.

    • Although documentation and research are not enough, it is nevertheless true that they are very important components to the safeguarding of ICH.

    • The question of inventories is one of the main obligations of state parties to the Convention and will be discussed tomorrow.


    Documentation and research63 l.jpg
    Documentation and Research these activities should feed into actual practice.

    • Generally speaking four main tools of documentation of ICH : the written form, audio recordings, visual documentation (photographs and drawings) and audio-visual documentation.

    • Each has its own particularities: for example when filming, it is important to avoid disruptive crews associated with large productions


    Documentation and research64 l.jpg
    Documentation and Research these activities should feed into actual practice.

    • How and where to conserve documents- who has access?

    • Documentation can involve sensitive questions related to secret knowledge, or even just issues of ‘good manners’.


    Documentation and research65 l.jpg
    Documentation and Research these activities should feed into actual practice.

    • Research necessitates the establishment of trust between the custodians of ICH and the person documenting. Caution with ‘rapid survey’ type work since people tend not to reveal their knowledge to strangers.

    • Best to seek for people who have long standing relations with a particular community.


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    Documentation and Research these activities should feed into actual practice.

    • Even better is to train community members in basic documentation techniques so that they may document within their own communities.

    • Community museums and or cultural centers can play an instrumental role here.


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    Education and Training these activities should feed into actual practice.

    • Important to include reference to ICH in education manuals and curricula

      • Even if know-how is not detailed in formal education, when included it can stimulate interest.

      • Can help mitigate sense of alienation in schools


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    Education and Training these activities should feed into actual practice.

    • When possible important to consider ‘mechanisms of transmission’ as discussed earlier: classroom not always best context.

    • Non formal education


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    Characteristics of an Inventory these activities should feed into actual practice.

    • Goals in safeguarding

    • Participation of communities and groups concerned

    • Geographic and demographic scope

    • Domains and definitions

    • Comprehensive and consistent information

    • Updating


    Outline for inventorying l.jpg

    Outline for inventorying these activities should feed into actual practice.


    Slide71 l.jpg

    1. Identification of the element these activities should feed into actual practice.

    1.1. Name of the element, as used by community or group concerned;

    1.2. Short, maximally informative title;

    1.3. Community(ies) concerned;

    1.4. Physical location(s) of element;

    1.5. Short description.

    2. Characteristics of the element

    2.1. Associated tangible elements (if any);

    2.2. Associated intangible elements (if any);

    2.3. Language(s), register(s), speech level(s) involved;

    2.4. Perceived origin.

    3. Persons and institutions involved with the element

    3.1. Practicianer(s)/performer(s) - name(s), age, gender, social status, and/or professional category, etc.;

    3.2. Other participants (e.g., holders/custodians);

    3.3. Customary practices governing access to the element or to aspects of it;

    3.3. Modes of transmission;

    3.4. Concerned organizations (NGOs and others).

    4. State of the element: viability

    4.1. Threats to the enactment;

    4.2. Threats to the transmission;

    4.3. Availability of associated tangible elements and resources;

    4.4. Viability of associated tangible and intangible elements;

    4.5 Safeguarding measures in place.

    5. Data gathering and inventorying

    5.1. Involvement of the community/group in, and consent for data gathering and inventorying;

    5.2. Restrictions, if any, on use of inventoried data;

    5.3. Resource persons(s) - name and status or affiliation;

    5.4. Date and place of data gathering;

    5.5. Date of entering data into an inventory;

    5.6. The inventory entry compiled by….

    6. Reference to literature, discography, audiovisual materials, archives.

    7. Other information

    UNESCO/ITH, 12/10/06


    1 identification l.jpg
    1. Identification these activities should feed into actual practice.

    • Name of the element

    • Short title

    • Community concerned

    • Physical location of element

    • Short description


    2 characteristics l.jpg
    2. Characteristics these activities should feed into actual practice.

    • Associated tangible elements

    • Associated intangible elements

    • Language, register, speech level involved

    • Perceived origin


    3 persons and institutions involved l.jpg
    3. Persons and institutions involved these activities should feed into actual practice.

    • Practitioners/performers

    • Other participants

      (e.g., holders/custodians)

    • Customary practices governing access

      to the element

    • Modes of transmission

    • Concerned organizations

      (NGOs and others)


    4 viability l.jpg
    4. Viability these activities should feed into actual practice.

    • Threats to the enactment

    • Threats to the transmission

    • Availability of associated

      tangible elements and resources

    • Viability of associated

      tangible and intangible elements

    • Safeguarding measures in place


    5 data gathering and inventorying l.jpg
    5. Data gathering and inventorying these activities should feed into actual practice.

    • Involvement of the community/group

    • Restrictions on use of inventoried data

    • Resource persons

    • Date and place of data gathering

    • Compilerdata


    Slide77 l.jpg


    International assistance purposes l.jpg
    International Assistance: these activities should feed into actual practice.Purposes

    Priority is given to requests for international assistance concerning:

    FORM ICH-04

    • the safeguarding of the heritage inscribed on the Urgent Safeguarding List;

    • the preparation of inventories in the sense of Articles 11 and 12;

    • support for programmes, projects and activities carried out at the national, sub-regional and regional levels aimed at the safeguarding of the intangible cultural heritage;

      FORM ICH-05/FORM ICH-06

      (d) preparatory assistance.


    International assistance selection criteria l.jpg
    International Assistance: these activities should feed into actual practice.Selection Criteria

    Decisions on granting assistance will be made followingcriteria:

    • Involvement of communities, groups and/or individuals concerned

      • the preparation of the request

      • the implementation of the proposed activities, and

      • their evaluation and follow-up

    • Appropriate requested amount

    • Feasibility of the proposed activities

    • Sustainability

    • Cost sharing with the submitting State Party

    • Capacity building in the field of safeguarding intangible cultural heritage


    International assistance procedures 1 l.jpg
    International Assistance these activities should feed into actual practice.Procedures (1)

    Is the request conformity with:

    Purposes

    Forms

    Criteria

    of the international assistance?

    Yes

    Use FORM ICH-05

    or FORM ICH-06

    Yes

    Is this request

    for preparatory assistance?

    No

    Use FORM ICH-04

    No

    Is the amount of the request

    over USD 25,000?

    No

    Is the request

    for emergency assistance?

    Yes

    Less than USD 25,000

    Submit anytime

    Submit on or before 30 April

    Yes

    Is the request submitted

    on or before the deadline?

    Submit anytime

    Yes

    No

    The request will be

    evaluated in the next cycle.

    A specific timetable for

    evaluation will be established

    on a case-by-case basis

    Is all information required

    submitted?


    International assistance procedures 2 l.jpg
    International Assistance these activities should feed into actual practice.Procedures (2)

    Can the request have been

    completed 4 weeks before

    the scheduled evaluation?

    No

    Is all information required

    submitted?

    Yes

    Is the amount of the request

    over USD 25,000?

    No

    Yes

    Yes

    It may be completed

    for a subsequent evaluation.

    No

    Examiners shall provide

    a report ontheir examination

    and a recommendation

    The Bureau of the Committee

    evaluates the request.

    The Committee

    evaluates the request.

    Informed the decision

    within two weeks

    Approved

    Monitoring,

    reporting and evaluation.

    Project implementation

    A contract is established.