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Using Classroom Assessment Techniques (Low Threshold Assessments) to Promote Student Learning. Dr. Barbara Millis University of Nevada, Reno Dr. Douglas Eder Southern Illinois University Edwardsville Dr. Ray Purdom University of North Carolina at Greensboro.

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using classroom assessment techniques low threshold assessments to promote student learning

Using Classroom Assessment Techniques (Low Threshold Assessments) to Promote Student Learning

Dr. Barbara Millis

University of Nevada, Reno

Dr. Douglas Eder

Southern Illinois University Edwardsville

Dr. Ray Purdom

University of North Carolina at Greensboro

slide4
How People Learn: Brain, Mind, Experience, and School

John D. Bransford, Ann L. Brown, and Rodney R. Cocking, editors

Committee on Developments in the Science of Learning

Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education

National Research Council

NATIONAL ACADEMY PRESS

Washington, D.C. 1999

http://www.nap.edu/html/howpeople1/notice.html

slide5

Three findings . . . have a solid research base to support them and strong implications for how we teach.—Bransford, Brown, & Cocking, Eds. How People Learn: Brain, Mind, Experience, and School.

three key learning principles

Three Key Learning Principles

Prior Knowledge: Students construct new knowledge based on what they already know (or don’t know);

Deep Foundational Knowledge: Students need a deep knowledge base and conceptual frameworks;

Metacognition: Students must identify learning goals and monitor their progress toward them.

slide7

Anderson, L. W. & Krathwohl, D. R. (2001). A Taxonomy for Learning, Teaching, and Assessment: A Revision of Bloom’s Taxonomy of Educational Objectives. New York: Longman.

The Knowledge Dimension

  • Metacognitive knowledge
  • Procedural knowledge
  • Conceptual knowledge
  • Factual knowledge
slide8

A “metacognitive” approach to instruction can help students learn to take control of their own learning by defining learning goals and monitoring their progress in achieving them.

Learning Principle #3

teaching learning implications from key finding 3
Teaching/Learning Implications from Key Finding #3

“The teaching of metacognitive skills [“thinking about thinking”] should be integrated into the curriculum in a variety of ways.”

—Bransford, Brown, & Cocking, Eds. How People Learn: Brain, Mind, Experience, and School.

teaching learning implications
Teaching/Learning Implications

Metacognitive approaches use strategies such as “teaching and modeling the process of generating alternative approaches, . . . evaluating their merits in helping to attain a goal, and monitoring progress toward that goal.”

--Bransford, Brown, & Cocking, Eds. How People Learn: Brain, Mind, Experience, and School.

metacognition and studying
Metacognition and Studying
  • In a perfect world, one would hope that:
    • Students spend the bulk of their time studying the most difficult material (after all, that is the material that will be hardest to get!)
  • Under real-world constraints:
    • Students allocate study time strategically
    • Students spend disproportionate amounts of time studying the easiest material
    • Students also spend more time studying material rated as “interesting” rather than material rated as less interesting
    • Students get the maximum accomplished in the smallest amount of time.

Son, L.K., & Metcalfe, J.  (2000).  Metacognitive and control strategies in study-time allocation.  Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 26, 204-221.

ltas for learning principle 3
LTAs for Learning Principle #3
  • Punctuated Lectures
  • Classroom Opinion Polls
  • Start-Stop-Continue
  • Minute Paper
punctuated lectures
Punctuated Lectures
  • Listen
  • Stop
  • Reflect
  • Write
  • Give Feedback
possible f2f questions
Possible F2F Questions
  • How fully and consistently were you concentrating on the lecture during these few minutes? Did you get distracted at any point? If so, how did you bring your attention back into focus?
  • What were you doing to record the information you were receiving? How successful were you?
  • What were you doing to make connections between this “new” information and what you already know?
  • What did you expect to come next in the lecture and why?
classroom opinion polls on course related issues
Classroom Opinion Pollson Course-related Issues

Can be a posed as a Likert scale, multiple choice, short answer, etc.

Quick Poll:

  • How many believe that classroom assessment techniques can improve student learning?
  • How many have learned something useful during this workshop?
paired talk aloud problem solving
Paired Talk-Aloud Problem Solving
  • Have students pair.
  • A student takes a difficult problem and talks through it, going into his/her thought process.
  • The second student does the same with a second problem.
minute paper
Minute Paper
  • What was the most important thing you learned during this session?
  • What important question remains unanswered?
minute paper for papers
Minute Paper for Papers

Before students hand in their papers, they answer questions or complete sentences such as the following:

  • I’m most satisfied with, I’m least satisfied with … I’m having problems with …
  • In writing this essay, what did you learn that surprised you? When editing your paper, what were you unsure about?
  • What changes would you make to this assignment?
  • This lesson/assignment is important to my role as a professional because…
analytical minute paper analysis via bloom s taxonomy lycoming college conference
Analytical Minute Paper:Analysis via Bloom’s TaxonomyLycoming College Conference
some general things to remember about cats ltas
Some General Things to Remember about CATs (LTAs):
  • Don’t ask if you don’t want to know;
  • Feedback to students is essential;
  • Adapt, don’t adopt;
  • Use CATs creatively and responsibly to reinvigorate your teaching and your students’ learning!

—Modified from Angelo and Cross

the good news for teachers and students
The Good News for Teachers and Students:

“There is no universal best teaching practice. If, instead, the point of departure is a core set of learning principles, then the selection of teaching strategies . . . can be purposeful.”

—Bransford, Brown, & Cocking, Eds. How People Learn: Brain, Mind, Experience, and School.

slide27

Knowing and learning are communal acts. They require a continual cycle of discussion, disagreement, and consensus over what has been and what it all means.—Parker Palmer

slide33
The

End!

Happy Teaching!