Electromagnetic InspectionEMI of Oil Country Tubular Goods - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

betty_james
slide1 n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Electromagnetic InspectionEMI of Oil Country Tubular Goods PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Electromagnetic InspectionEMI of Oil Country Tubular Goods

play fullscreen
1 / 68
Download Presentation
Electromagnetic InspectionEMI of Oil Country Tubular Goods
916 Views
Download Presentation

Electromagnetic InspectionEMI of Oil Country Tubular Goods

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

    1. 1 Electromagnetic Inspection(EMI) of Oil Country Tubular Goods

    2. 2 1.0 PURPOSE This training course was prepared to provide the necessary instruction to achieve operator proficiency in the use of Electromagnetic Inspection (EMI) Units. This classroom training course is intended to supplement experience gained in actual performance of EMI Inspection.

    3. 3 2.0 SCOPE This training course covers theory, techniques, equipment set-up, calibration and use. The Electromagnetic Inspection (EMI) of Oil Country Tubular Goods course assumes operators have a minimum understanding of Magnetic Particle Inspection Techniques (MT), at least compatible to NDT Level II in the MT discipline.

    4. 4 3.0 REFERENCES 3.1 General Dynamics Programmed Home Study Guide for Magnetic Particle Testing 3.2 IPIA Consumer Seminar Nondestructive Testing of Oil Field Tubular Goods

    5. 5 4.0 HISTORICAL DEVELOPMENT OF INSPECTION INDUSTRY Prior to the year 1930, the term nondestructive inspection was not a part of the language of the oil industry. Many testing methods included chemical analysis, tensile, compressive and impact tests. Such tests were mainly limited to destructive tests made on samples that were from large lots.

    6. 6 4.1 Hydrostatic Test The principle test for oil country tubular goods was a hydrostatic test, which consisted of filling the tube with water and pressurizing it to a percentage of its tensile strength. At this time there was no urgent need for nondestructive inspection. The wells were not very deep, pressures were not very high, and the usual solution to prevent collapse of parts was to simply increase the wall thickness. The significance of seams, laps, rolled in slugs, inclusions, laminations, and notch-like defects initiating failures was not yet fully recognized. 4.2 Visual Inspection Visual inspection was made with a specially designed optical instrument called a Borescope which enabled the viewer to see 360 of the pipes inside surface. This method was employed along with hydrostatic testing to prove the integrity of a joint of pipe.

    7. 7 4.3 Magnetic Particle Method The decade from 1930 to 1940 brought many changes in inspection techniques. William E. Hoke discovered the principle that uses magnetic fields and ferromagnetic particles to locate surface cracks in metal. While working at the Bureau of Standards, he found that the metallic grindings from hard steel parts that were being ground while held on a magnetic check would form patterns on the face of the part. This discovery was the basis of longitudinal magnetization for the location of transverse cracks by the magnetic particle method. Some unsuccessful attempts were made to apply Hokes discovery, but it was A.V. DeForrest who realized the importance of controlling the direction of the magnetic field. His ideas resulted in circular magnetization and the use of magnetic powder in controlled sizes and shapes for consistent and reliable results. The contributions that DeForrest made formed the basis for magnetic particle inspection as it is known today.

    8. 8 4.4 Electromagnetic Inspection The technique of magnetic flux leakage detected by a transducer was introduced in the late 1940s. This involved a transducer being moved along a magnetized piece of pipe at a predetermined speed. When the transducer crossed an interruption in the magnetic field, an electrical impulse was generated and recorded on a strip chart. This was the beginning of electromagnetic inspection. This pioneer unit involved one transducer and one electrical channel for the detection of transverse and three-dimensional defects such as slugs, transverse fatigue cracks, and corrosion pitting. This unit was improved to include eight transducers in two banks of four, which overlapped to cover the entire OD surface of the pipe. Subsequent equipment improvements have resulted in the current use of a revolving transducer with a continuous transverse field for the detection of longitudinal defects such as seams and longitudinal cracks.

    9. 9

    10. 10

    11. 11

    12. 12

    13. 13

    14. 14

    15. 15

    16. 16

    17. 17

    18. 18

    19. 19

    20. 20

    21. 21

    22. 22

    23. 23

    24. 24

    25. 25

    26. 26

    27. 27

    28. 28

    29. 29

    30. 30

    31. 31

    32. 32

    33. 33

    34. 34

    35. 35

    36. 36

    37. 37

    38. 38

    39. 39

    40. 40

    41. 41

    42. 42

    43. 43

    44. 44

    45. 45

    46. 46

    47. 47

    48. 48

    49. 49

    50. 50

    51. 51

    52. 52

    53. 53

    54. 54

    55. 55

    56. 56

    57. 57

    58. 58

    59. 59

    60. 60

    61. 61

    62. 62

    63. 63

    64. 64

    65. 65

    66. 66

    67. 67

    68. 68