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Strategic Information Management (SIM) is the process by which top agency officials and line managers plan, direct, and evaluate the use of information and information technologies to help accomplish their programmatic objectives. Technology is becoming the vehicle from which

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Presentation Transcript
slide1

Strategic Information Management (SIM)

is the process by which top agency officials and line managers plan, direct, and evaluate the use of information and information technologies to help accomplish their programmatic objectives.

slide2

Technology is becoming the vehicle from which

accurate, reliable, and timely

information is produced for

strategizing,

identifying objectives,

improving productivity, and

facilitating service delivery

slide3

Spending on Technology

10% of gross GDP larger than auto, steel, mining, petrochemical, and natural gas industries combined

billions

Tapscott and Caston, 1993; Keen, 1991

slide4

Forecasted Expenditures for 2001

$45b

Billions

$32b

G2 Research, 1997

slide5

Scholars such as Davenport, Drucker, Marsh, Keen, and Attwell and Rule question why people remain so willing to speak and write as though the overall effects of computing were a foregone conclusion.....

…..and that claims about the almost deterministic relationship between investing in office technology, personal computers, and information systems and getting improved productivity have produced too few proven results. Its as if there is some missing ingredient.....

slide6

a feast of choices

&

a famine of benefits

30% of all projects are canceled before completion

30% experience schedule delays

50% exceed original cost estimates

12% completed on time and on budget

1995 $81 billion spent on canceled technology projects

The Standish Group, 1995

Cats-Baril & Thompson, 1995

slide8

The challenge for managers is:

knowing how to best integrate strategic goals, information, and technology into common organizational procedures

and

knowing how to apply management strategies to information technology adoption efforts

slide9

The definition of project success has been

modified to include completion:

- Within the allocated time period

- Within the budgeted cost

- At the proper performance or specification level

- With acceptance by the customer/user

- With minimum or mutually agreed upon scope changes

- Without unintentionally disturbing the main work flow of the organization

- Without unintentionally changing the corporate culture

slide10

Strategic alignment. . .

Align IT systems with your mission, goals, and programs. . .

Demonstrate an IT “Results Chain”. . .

Build and Enforce a Disciplined Flow From. . .

Goals. . .

Objectives. . .

Measures. . .

slide11

Operational Impacts. . .

Demonstrate how IT initiatives will . . .

Meet the strategic Needs of the Enterprise

Meet the needs of individual operational customers

Meet internal IT business performance

Meet ongoing IT innovation and learning

slide12

Org goals & obj

IT Purpose

mission/vision

IT goals

Vital few

IT obj

Vital few

IT measures

IT mngmnt/staff

perf expec

IT Results Chain

Measurement Development and Alignment

diverge/converge goals, objectives, and measures

Measure, Communication, Collection, Analysis, Use

slide13

Process Measures

  • What Is Done To, For, With, Or By Defined Individuals Or Groups As Part Of The Delivery Of Services, Such As Performing A Procedure
  • Capacity Measures
  • The Ability To Provide Specific Services Made Possible By The Development And Maintenance Of The Information System Infrastructure
  • Outcome/Output Measures
  • Change (Or Lack Thereof) Measured By Impact/Results
  • Improvements In Individual Ability To Perform In The Organization
  • Customer Satisfaction
slide14

Policy

Technology

Efficiency gains

Performance gains

Administration

Knowledge gains

Inputs

Cost drivers

Outputs

Benefits

slide15
Efficiency Gains
  • Lower Costs (Cheaper)

Performance Gains

  • Detect Change Over Time And Differences In Change Across Programs
  • Improved Productivity (Faster/Better)
slide16

Reduce cost

capturing process information

enabling parallelism

coordinating processes across distances

combine similar tasks/activities

reduce complexity

reduce cycle time

add value

Policy

Efficiency gains

Performance gains

Technology

Administration

Knowledge gains

slide17

Knowledge about:

  • Mission
  • People
  • Technology
  • Services
  • Finances
  • Processes
  • Market

Policy

Efficiency gains

Performance gains

Technology

Administration

Knowledge gains

slide19

Knowledge is a fluid mix of framed experience, values, contextual information, and expert insight that provides a framework for evaluating and incorporating new experiences and information.

In organizations, it often becomes embedded not only in documents and repositories but also in organizational routines, processes, practices, and norms.

Davenport and Prusak, 1998.Working Knowledge

the learning organization
The Learning Organization
  • Takes in Information, Material and Energy from the External Environment,
  • Transforms these Resources into Knowledge,
  • Makes Changes in Processes and Structures that Produce Goods or Services which Are Consumed in the Environment
a learning organization is skilled at
A Learning Organization Is Skilled at…….
  • Creating,
  • Acquiring, and
  • Transferring

Knowledge

how does an organization use knowledge
How Does An Organization Use Knowledge
  • Organizations Use Information And Technology As A Stabilizing Mechanism To Gain Control Over The Environment, “As Signal”
  • Shared Information Facilitates Continuous Improvements In Service Delivery-VERTICALLY, HORIZONTALLY, AND DIAGONALLY
  • Technology In Learning Organizations Provides Real Time Access To Allow Instant Shifts In Direction Not As A Supporting Tool For Routine Decision-Making
  • Organizations Use Knowledge to Create Learning Organizations
what is knowledge
What Is Knowledge?

Data

Information

ACTION

knowledge balance sheet
Knowledge Balance Sheet
  • Know (Assets)
  • Don’t Know (Liabilities)
slide25

action or

experience

Doing

ideologies

Planning

choosing

future action

Reflecting

interests

observing,

feeling,

thinking

information

Conceptualizing

interpreting meaning

why do we need knowledge management now
Why Do We Need Knowledge Management Now???
  • Most work is information based
  • Organizations compete on the basis of knowledge
  • Services are increasingly complex giving them a significant information need component

Need for life-long learning is reality! !

slide27

Construct measures that determine how well IT is supporting strategic, customer, and internal business needs

Match measures and performance results to various stakeholders:

community

council / advisory board

executive staff

senior to mid-level managers

operation staff

slide28

Provide indicators and measures of the proposed solution will support operational efforts. . .

Provide tangible measures of all operational benefits. . .

slide29

What we will do… [Increase/decrease] task production/service delivery initiative

How much we will do… [xx percent / time]

The timeframe it will be done in… by [timeframe]

The gain we will receive… for a savings of

Generating

Acquiring

Combining

Identifying

Organizing

Storing

Collecting

Representing

Deepening

Adapting

Analyzing

Codifying

Applying

Communicating

Distributing

Transferring

Changing

Improving

Expanding

slide30

Tangible / Measurable Benefits

Operational Benefits

- Reduce the distribution of department and community crime information from up to 36 hours down to 15 seconds (8600x faster).

- Create the capacity for direct communication between officers, investigators, and other agencies regardless of day of week, time of day, or location, for significantly increased exchange of crime and suspect information, via e-mail.

slide31

Tangible / Measurable Benefits

- Improve officers’ ability to solve problems by reducing access time to incident and arrest reports from an hour to less than 15 seconds (240 x improvement) This represents a time reduction of 240 times and a cost savings of $26 per instance. If 1400 officers were to retrieve one report per working day, the savings for this one example would be $8,554,000 annually. However, for the officer to be an effective problem solver, the officer would likely retrieve more than one report per working day.

- Reduce arrest processing time by 25%. 20,000 hours of 40 minutes per arrest will be saved, resulting in $400,000 of additional officer time in the field.

- Reduce time needed to process cases for the District Attorney by 20,000 hours, resulting in $400,000 of additional officer time in the field

- Increase time sergeants spend supervising, directing, and training patrol officers by 25%: 19,920 hours saved (1 hour per day) resulting in $600,000 per year additional supervisory time in field.

- Total Savings based on these examples is $9,954,000.

slide32

Cheaper

Reduce duplication in areas such as data collection and program development

Generate revenue

Savings in non-personal services: telephone, printing, mailing

Savings in personal services

Faster

Reduce the number of steps in a process

Staff receive access to information in a more timely manner

Citizens get access to services in a more timely manner

Better

Improved responsiveness to citizen need through 24-hour access

More satisfied clients because information is more accurate and consistent

Ability to reach more customers with existing services

slide33

repeat visitors

orders taken

questions submitted

files downloaded

services delivered

steady average, trends, patterns

percent increase in site usage

number of simultaneous users that can be supported

slide34

The Measurement Paradox

Look to see what is going on in your own agency

have processes been streamlined?

Is client satisfaction up?

Is worker frustration down?

Are people contributing to your system?

Have new opportunities emerged?

What percentage of staff are publishing information to the database?

What percentage is retrieving information on a daily basis?

Is it faster & easier to collaborate?

Has better decision making resulted?

Have services improved?

slide35

Process Measures

  • What Is Done To, For, With, Or By Defined Individuals Or Groups As Part Of The Delivery Of Services, Such As Performing A Procedure
  • Capacity Measures
  • The Ability To Provide Specific Services Made Possible By The Development And Maintenance Of The Information System Infrastructure
  • Outcome/Output Measures
  • Change (Or Lack Thereof) Measured By Impact/Results
  • Improvements In Individual Ability To Perform In The Organization
  • Customer Satisfaction
slide36

Policy

Technology

Efficiency gains

Performance gains

Administration

Knowledge gains

Inputs

Cost drivers

Outputs

Benefits