engl1001 american literature f scott fitzgerald the great gatsby 1925 n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
ENGL1001 – American Literature F. Scott Fitzgerald – The Great Gatsby (1925) PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
ENGL1001 – American Literature F. Scott Fitzgerald – The Great Gatsby (1925)

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 32

ENGL1001 – American Literature F. Scott Fitzgerald – The Great Gatsby (1925) - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 275 Views
  • Uploaded on

ENGL1001 – American Literature F. Scott Fitzgerald – The Great Gatsby (1925). Dr. John Masterson 1 st Lecture July-August 2010. You can access these presentations through the ENGL1 blog. Go to – http://witsenglishi.wordpress.com. Herman Melville, ‘Hawthorne and His Mosses’ 1850.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

ENGL1001 – American Literature F. Scott Fitzgerald – The Great Gatsby (1925)


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
engl1001 american literature f scott fitzgerald the great gatsby 1925

ENGL1001 – American LiteratureF. Scott Fitzgerald – The Great Gatsby (1925)

Dr. John Masterson

1st Lecture

July-August 2010

you can access these presentations through the engl1 blog
You can access these presentations through the ENGL1 blog
  • Go to – http://witsenglishi.wordpress.com
herman melville hawthorne and his mosses 1850
Herman Melville, ‘Hawthorne and His Mosses’ 1850
  • “no American writer should write like an Englishman, or a Frenchman; let him write like a man, for then he will be sure to write like an American … Let us boldly condemn all imitation, though it comes to us graceful and fragrant as the morning, and foster all originality, though, at first, it be crabbed and ugly as our own pine knots.”
f scott fitzgerald s obituary 1896 1940 published in the new york times
F. Scott Fitzgerald’s Obituary (1896-1940) published in The New York Times
  • “The best of his books, the critics said, was The Great Gatsby. When it was published in 1925 this ironic tale of life on Long Island at a time when gin was the national drink and sex the national obsession (according to the exponents of Mr. Fitzgerald’s school of writers), it received critical acclaim. In it Mr. Fitzgerald was at his best, which was, according to John Chamberlain, his “ability to catch the flavor of a period, the fragrance of a night, a snatch of old song, in a phrase.”
slide7

Taken from letter written by Fitzgerald to his daughter, cited in Matthew J. Bruccoli, Some Sort of Epic Grandeur – The Life of F. Scott Fitzgerald (1981), p.123.

  • “If you have anything to say, anything you feel nobody has ever said before, you have got to feel it so desperately that you will find some way to say it that nobody has ever found before, so that the thing you have to say and the way of saying it BLEND AS ONE MATTER – as indissolubly as if they were conceived together.”
some areas to consider when it comes to thinking about texts in relation to their contexts
Some areas to consider when it comes to thinking about texts in relation to their contexts
  • History – time
  • Geography – space/place – spatial context – urban/rural? Questions of regionalism
  • Economic
  • Socio-political
  • Cultural
  • Intellectual – philosophical – the world of ideas
  • Autobiographical/personal
the american mid west
The American Mid-West

Fitzgerald was born in St. Paul, Minnesota in 1896. Our first person narrator in The Great Gatsby, Nick Carraway, is also from the Mid-West.

the american east coast
The American East Coast

New York is indicated by the number 4 on this map

richard gray a history of american literature 2004 p 435
Richard Gray, A History of American Literature (2004), p.435
  • “Of all American writers concerned with the inventions of Modernism, F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896-1940) was the most autobiographical.”
  • Fitzgerald - “’Sometimes I don’t know whether I’m real or whether I’m a character in one of my own novels.’”
  • “the protagonists of his books … bear an extraordinary resemblance to their creator. In each case, there is the same commitment to flamboyant excess, combined with a very personal kind of idealism; in each case, too, there is a testing, a trying out taking place – of the dreams of power, possibility and wealth that have fuelled America and individual Americans and of how those dreams can be negotiated in a world dedicated to consumption, a surfeit of commodities.”
fitzgerald s definition of the jazz age
Fitzgerald’s definition of ‘The Jazz Age’
  • “a generation grown up to find all Gods dead, all wars fought, all faiths in man shaken.”
from matthew j bruccoli some sort of epic grandeur the life of f scott fitzgerald 1981 p 133
From Matthew J. Bruccoli, Some Sort of Epic Grandeur – The Life of F. Scott Fitzgerald (1981), p.133.
  • “Their marriage coincided with the beginning of the Boom, the Era of Wonderful Nonsense, the Roaring Twenties, what Fitzgerald named the Jazz Age and described as “the greatest, gaudiest spree in history.” In point of fact, Fitzgerald knew almost nothing about jazz and did not write about it. His explication of the term in “Echoes of the Jazz Age” (1931) reveals that he used it to connote a mood or psychological condition: “The word jazz in its progress toward respectability has first meant sex, then dancing, then music. It is associated with a state of nervous stimulation, not unlike that of big cities behind the lines of a war.” Fitzgerald began as a spokesman of the Jazz Age and became its symbol. With his capacity for becoming identified with his times, he came to represent the excesses of the Twenties – its Prince Charming and its fool.”
richard gray a history of american literature 2004 p 4351
Richard Gray, A History of American Literature (2004), p.435
  • “Easily as much as any American writer, and more than most, Fitzgerald demonstrates the paradox that to talk of oneself may also be to talk of one’s times, the character of a culture – and that self-revelation, ultimately, can be a revelation of humanity.”
from matthew j bruccoli some sort of epic grandeur the life of f scott fitzgerald 1981 p 187
From Matthew J. Bruccoli, Some Sort of Epic Grandeur – The Life of F. Scott Fitzgerald (1981), p.187.
  • “The studies of literary alcoholism are inconclusive. Many of the best American writers of the twentieth century have had alcohol problems: Fitzgerald, Faulkner, O’Neill, O’Hara, Wolfe, Lardner, Hemingway, Lewis, Chandler, Hammett. There is evidently a connection between alcoholism and creative personality; but it remains unclear whether writers drink because they are writers. Writing and drinking are both forms of exhibitionism and escapism.”
the oxford english dictionary definition of prohibition
The Oxford English Dictionary Definition of ‘Prohibition’
  • “the prevention by law of the manufacture and sale of alcohol in the US from 1920 to 1933.”
slide31

An Image from the 1974 film adaptation of The Great Gatsby

Robert Redford plays Gatsby while Mia Farrow plays Daisy