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Daily ‘Life in the Trenches’ of WWI. The Trench cycle varied widely. (70, 30 ,120 70 days) Daily routine began with morning Stand To -soldiers climb up to Fire Step Morning hate- machine gun fire Clean rifle and inspection Breakfast is served Chores

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Daily ‘Life in the Trenches’ of WWI


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    1. Daily ‘Life in the Trenches’ of WWI • The Trench cycle varied widely. (70, 30 ,120 70 days) • Daily routine began with morning Stand To -soldiers climb up to Fire Step • Morning hate- machine gun fire • Clean rifle and inspection • Breakfast is served • Chores • Movement only at night Created by: Natori Moore and DestyniToddman-Goode

    2. Health in the Trenches • Food and fresh water • Lack of Hygiene • Parasites and Rodents • Trench Fever • The horrible smell • Sleep deprivation was common Created by: Natori Moore and DestyniToddman-Goode

    3. Shellshock serene ahmad and jenna ward • Disease that soldiers got from fighting in the war • At first, doctors thought it was from the shells that came from the guns • Without any physical evidence, they decided that it was a mental disorder

    4. Shellshock serene ahmad and jenna ward • Soldiers who had this found themselves re-living the moments of war when they got off the battle field • Some could not eat or sleep • Men who had this disease were looked at as cowards, and in some cases were shot to death by their own side • They could be dreaming of murder and have “stammered, disconnected talk.” • Treatment for this could be harsh

    5. Women’s Roles • Employed to support family • Some women were paid employees of munitions factories • The average salary of women increased during World War 1 • Still only about two-thirds of what men made • Volunteered with The Red Cross • Knitted socks for soldiers • Promoted the sale of war bonds • Planted Victory Gardens Abbygayle Boggs Jensen Collins

    6. Women’s Roles Cont. • Enlisted in the military • About 12,000 women entered the U.S. military • Of these about four hundred died • About 2,800 women entered the Canadian Military • Of these about forty died • Some women worked as nurses for injured soldiers Abbygayle Boggs Jensen Collins

    7. WWI: Block 1 Nelson 1/9/12

    8. Carrier pigeons By: Deep Duggal & Olivia Williams

    9. Who: Carrier pigeons • What: They sent critical messages to other troops. • When: World War One • Where: International military bases, camps, and battle sites. • Why: The soldiers did not have the modern technology that we use for communication.

    10. Could only be trained to fly to known positions. • Can carry up to 2.5 oz on their backs with training. • Could be captured by enemy soldiers or killed by enemy hawks. If captured by enemies, any messages that were being carried by a pigeon could be read. • Over 10,000 were used in WW1. • They have a 95% success rate of delivering their messages. • Cher ami lost his foot but still got his message to a group of surrounded Americans.

    11. Sources • Duffy, Michael. "Carrier Pigeons." firsrtworldwar.com. Michael Duffy, 22 Aug. 2009. Web. 6 Jan. 2012. • "Carrier pigeon." Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., 28 Dec. 2011. Web. 6 Jan. 2012. • Trueman, Chris. "Pigeons and World War One." History Learning Site. historylearningsite.co.uk, n.d. Web. 6 Jan. 2012.

    12. Tanks in World War I • Tanks originated in the war due to a "stalemate" in trench warfare; a vehicle was needed that could be very durable and move through any surface with heavy armor • The tank would be used to break enemy defenses and travel across No Man’s Land leading a wave of infantry • The British were the first to develop it followed by the French and then the other countries In this picture, a British tank is leaving the trenches prepared to stage an attack on the opposite German trenches. As seen, the tank is strong enough to move across the steep inclines of trenches

    13. Tanks in World War I: The Two Sides Allied Powers Central POwers • The British and French lead all the countries for tanks built a little over 6500 tanks • The British invented 2 tanks series: Mark and Mk. Series along with many other smaller tanks • The French designed 3 tanks: • The US developed smaller tanks that were not used often, an example being the Holt Gas Electric Tank • The Germans did not favor tanks and instead focused on anti-tank weapons rather than production of tanks. • Only 21 tanks were produced for operations Here we see one of the few AZVs to be ever be deployed onto the battlefield

    14. Christmas Miracle December 1914 • Took place during WWI, when the Germans were in battle with the British and French. • It started out as a “one mans show” by the Germans and then quickly became something else… a TRUCE! • German soldiers began to sing Christmas carols and putting up decorated Christmas trees. • on the opposite side, the British and French troops heard the Germans and they began to sing Christmas carols also • Some of the Germans had learned to speak English in England before the war and so they were able to suggest a “peace treaty”

    15. Christmas Miracle December 1914 • So the Germans began to make boards to hold up for the British and French to read which said: “YOU NO FIGHT, WE NO FIGHT,” in as much English as possible • The British posted signs that read: “MERRY CHRISTMAS!” • After the peace was established the soldiers, British, German, and French made their way to Flanders Battlefield • First the troops buried all the troops who were killed then they sang more carols and exchanged gifts and played soccer • The gifts included: chocolate cake, cognac, tobacco and newspapers • A few days later the troops were back fighting each other

    16. Central Powers Weapon Advancements • The Germans were responsible for many of the weapon advancements of the Central Powers. • They were the first to successfully implement poison gas on the battlefield. • The widespread use of machineguns was also pioneered by the Germans.

    17. Allied PowersWeapon Advancements • Large head wounds caused the French to install the Adrian helmet, the first steel helmet. • In 1914, the British used aircraft as bomber planes and for recon against enemy troops. • British sailor deaths forced the British to create depth charges, hydrophones, and HMSs. • On Sept. 15, 1916 the first tanks were used by the British and were fielded by the 100s.

    18. Mustard Gas History: first used by the Germans, it is a yellowish-brown color gas that is one of the most dangerous chemicals ever used in world war 1. Tia Broady and Ashley Pummel

    19. How was it used: used in the trenches to kill the opposing side. Could be used even when there wasn’t an attack going on. • Effects: • eyes: redness, inflammation, and maybe even blindness. • Skin: redness, itchy, and finally sore, painful blisters. • Respiratory: painful blister were you came in contact with it. Air ways close up, noses are bleed and become swollen. • Abdominal pain, nausea, diarrhea, and vomiting. • What part did it play in the war: it was widely used as a chemical killing agent. mustard Gas

    20. Trench Warfare: What is it? • Trenches were a major part of combat in World War I. • Both sides (The Allies and The Axis Powers) used them. Between the trenches of both sides was an area known as No Man’s Land. • They were created by digging 8-foot pits that were miles and miles long. The excess dirt was piled on either side of the trench to prevent bullets from reaching the men inside. • Sometimes, the trenches were also lined with sandbags to increase defense. • To make the trenches hard to capture, they were rigged with booby traps such as barbed-wire doors. Also, the trenches were in a zigzag line because a straight line would make it easy to fire a bullet down the entire trench. • In general, they were deep enough for a man to stand up straight without being seen.

    21. Trench Tactics There were three main strategies used in trench warfare: Bombardment-One side showers their enemies’ trenches with bullets in order to later capture the trench. The Creeping Barrage-This method is two steps. The first wave of troops would fire bullets to distract the enemy. Then, the second wave would “creep” across No Man’s Land and capture the opposition’s trenches. Tunnel Digging-One side would dig a tunnel to the other underneath No Man’s Land. The idea was to get to the other side and attack without being seen.

    22. Citations Saigeon, Joanna R. "Trench Warfare." Harris Academy, Dundee. Web. 05 Jan. 2012. <http://www.harris-academy.com/departments/history/Trenches/Joanna/joanna1.htm>. Trench Warfare. Digital image. Google. Web. 08 Jan. 2012. <http://doctormurphy.files.wordpress.com/2008/10/trench-warfare.jpg>. Trench Warfare. Digital image. Jaunted. Concierge.com. Web. 05 Jan. 2012. <http://www.jaunted.com/files/16133/Trench_Warfare_2.jpg>.

    23. J. McKnight , the second recorded survivor of a simultaneous triple amputation. World War I : Amputations By Gretchen Perez & Monae McNeil

    24. Facts : • Between 1914 and 1921 more than 41,000 men lost at least one limb • The soldiers were entitled to free artificial limbs • Limb making was an extremely slow process and they were not able to produce enough • Making things worse there was a lack of hospitals to have the procedure done and receive new artificial limbs • In result, Queen Mary’s Hospital was opened for the injured men

    25. How have amputation procedures improved, you might ask? MODERN • Modern tools and procedures greatly lessen the chances of a patient dying on the table • Modern anesthesia means patients can safely be operated with out experiencing pain during the surgery.  • Modern hygiene helps prevent infections although gangrene can still cause people to loose limbs today.

    26. World War I Casualties • Though WWI was not the longest, it was the most violent • Over 36 million casualties total This is the photo of the French Trench War, where some soldiers are wounded and others are dead.

    27. World War I Casualties • Approximately 21 million people were wounded • More than 12 million deaths total • 10 million military men • 6 million: Allied Powers • 4 million: Central Powers • 7 million civilians • Two thirds of the military deaths were in battle • Other third died of disease • 52,402 US military deaths by combat • 116,516 US military deaths by war

    28. Health in the Trenches • Food and fresh water • Lack of Hygiene • Parasites and Rodents • Trench Fever • The horrible smell • Sleep deprivation was common Created by: Natori Moore and DestyniToddman-Goode

    29. Daily ‘Life in the Trenches’ of WWI • The Trench cycle varied widely. (70, 30 ,120 70 days) • Daily routine began with morning Stand To -soldiers climb up to Fire Step • Morning hate- machine gun fire • Clean rifle and inspection • Breakfast is served • Chores • Movement only at night Created by: Natori Moore and DestyniToddman-Goode

    30. Christmas Miracle December 1914 • So the Germans began to make boards to hold up for the British and French to read which said: “YOU NO FIGHT, WE NO FIGHT,” in as much English as possible • The British posted signs that read: “MERRY CHRISTMAS!” • After the peace was established the soldiers, British, German, and French made their way to Flanders Battlefield • First the troops buried all the troops who were killed then they sang more carols and exchanged gifts and played soccer • The gifts included: chocolate cake, cognac, tobacco and newspapers • A few days later the troops were back fighting each other

    31. Christmas Miracle December 1914 • Took place during WWI, when the Germans were in battle with the British and French. • It started out as a “one mans show” by the Germans and then quickly became something else… a TRUCE! • German soldiers began to sing Christmas carols and putting up decorated Christmas trees. • on the opposite side, the British and French troops heard the Germans and they began to sing Christmas carols also • Some of the Germans had learned to speak English in England before the war and so they were able to suggest a “peace treaty”

    32. World War I Casualties • Approximately 21 million people were wounded • More than 12 million deaths total • 10 million military men • 6 million: Allied Powers • 4 million: Central Powers • 7 million civilians • Two thirds of the military deaths were in battle • Other third died of disease • 52,402 US military deaths by combat • 116,516 US military deaths by war

    33. World War I Casualties • Though WWI was not the longest, it was the most violent • Over 36 million casualties total This is the photo of the French Trench War, where some soldiers are wounded and others are dead.

    34. Trench Foot • Condition of the foot that happens when one comes in contact with unsanitary and damp grounds for a long time. • Foot may become numb turning red or blue because of blood not reaching the foot to an affective level. • It can occur in temperatures up to 60 degrees ferinheight. • Trench foot can easily be prevented by keeping ones feet dry and warm. • If someone cant keep their feet then changing socks frequently would be very helpful.

    35. Trench Foot • During world war 1, trench soldiers were given wale grease and told to apply it to their feet, so they can reduce the chances of getting trench foot. • They thought that wale grease made their feet waterproof. • This isn’t the case however, the wale grease actually helped their feet absorb even more water. • Trench foot was mainly a problem for soldiers in the trench warfare, which includes world war 1 ,world war 2 and the Vietnam war.