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MRSA & Bloodborne Pathogens

MRSA & Bloodborne Pathogens

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MRSA & Bloodborne Pathogens

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  1. MRSA & Bloodborne Pathogens WARNING: Some of the following pictures may be gross

  2. Objectives • Define MRSA, Staph, bloodborne pathogens, and universal precautions • Recognize symptoms of MRSA and how it is spread • List 2 bloodborne pathogens and their symptoms

  3. MRSAMethicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureas • What is it? • “Staph” = bacteria that live on the skin & in the nose • Usually harmless • Estimated though that staph fatalities may exceed AIDS deaths • MRSA = type of staph • Resistant to several types of antibiotics

  4. MRSA • Who gets it? • Anyone • Most often in hospitals & healthcare facilities • Athletes or other individuals in high contact activities

  5. MRSA • How is it spread? • Touching the infected skin/wound • Sharing objects such as towels or athletic equipment • Typically through physical contact (not air)

  6. What does MRSA look like? • Mainly on skin, in the nose, in wounds, or in urine & blood • Around open wounds or other openings where bacteria can get inside the body • Common skin conditions caused by MRSA: • Infected cuts • Boils • Infected hair follicles • Fluid filled blisters (impetigo) • Skin sores that look like insect bites

  7. MRSA • Can spread to surrounding tissue • Leads to abscesses or infections of the: • Blood • Bone • Heart infections • Treatment? • Some antibiotics are successful

  8. Once MRSA is gone… • Bacteria may still live in your nose • Wash hands often • Sneeze or cough into tissue • If new infection occurs, cover & see MD

  9. Prevention? • Wash hands often!! • If skin infection occurs, keep area clean & covered • Change bandage often – especially if wet • Prevent wound drainage from coming in contact with anyone else • Avoid public spas, saunas, pools, manicures, gyms, etc

  10. **Bloodborne Pathogens • **Pathogenic microorganisms that can potentially cause disease • **Universal Precautions • **Assume all fluid is contaminated fluid • Cover open skin wounds • Remove bleeding athletes from play • Possible uniform change • **Protective equipment • **Gloves, gowns, masks, eye shield, CPR masks

  11. **Hepatitis B • **Major cause of viral infection affecting liver functions • Dramatic increase in last 10 years • Stronger, more durable than HIV • Signs/Symptoms • Flulike, **jaundice, not present • Transmission • Direct & indirect (surfaces – 1 week) contact

  12. Hepatitis B • Infectious Material • Blood, saliva, semen, feces, food, water • Prevention • Good hygiene, avoid high risk behaviors, vaccine • Recovery • Usually within 6-8 weeks

  13. **Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) • **Viral infection that attacks healthy cells • Estimated 40 million by 2000 • Signs/Symptoms • Fever, night sweats, weight loss, diarrhea, severe fatigue, swollen lymph nodes, lesions, none (8-10 years) • Transmission • Direct & indirect contact

  14. HIV • Infectious materials • Blood, semen, vaginal fluid • Management • “cocktails” • **Prevention • **Education • Little risk to athletes, but possible