Wom anhood & Citizenship: The American Woman Suffrage Movement, 1869-1920 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Wom anhood & Citizenship: The American Woman Suffrage Movement, 1869-1920

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  1. Womanhood & Citizenship:The American Woman Suffrage Movement, 1869-1920

  2. Origins • Declaration of Sentiments, 1848 • Movement split, 1869 • Fifteenth Amendment, 1870 • Minor v. Happersett, 1874

  3. Elizabeth Cady Stanton • Held first Women’s Rights Convention, 1848 • “Brains” of the movement: inspirational writings and speeches • Increasingly radical views (The Woman’s Bible) • Dies in 1902

  4. Susan B. Anthony • “Legs” of the movement • Living symbol of suffrage cause due to ceaseless travel • “Aunt Susan” to many • Dies in 1906

  5. Successes • Legislation: Married Women’s Property Acts • Higher Education • WCTU founding, 1874; NACW, 1896 • United in one organization/one cause, 1890 • Women voting in 4 western states: Wyoming(1869); Utah(1870); Colorado(1893); Idaho(1896).

  6. Woman Suffrage in 1900 Challenges: • Other compelling issues drawing women away • Arduous state-by-state campaigns • New leaders needed

  7. Harriot Stanton Blatch New Leaders Alice Stone Blackwell

  8. New Leaders Carrie Chapman Catt, c. 1900 Anna Howard Shaw "Nothing bigger can come to a human being than to love a great cause more than life itself."

  9. Suffrage in the “Doldrums”? • Movement now international • British Pankhursts spur new assertiveness • 4 more western states won 1910-2(WA, CA, KS, OR) • New generation of women unwilling to wait

  10. The Pankhursts Emmeline Pankhurst Christabel Pankhurst

  11. The Pankhursts

  12. The Pankhursts

  13. Blatch steps forward • New Organizations • New Tactics

  14. More British inspiration • Alice Paul • Quaker from Moorestown NJ • Early twenties • Studying in Britain 1908-09

  15. Back to America ►Alice Paul returns 1910 ► How to use British experience for American suffrage? ► Approaches leaders of NAWSA in 1912

  16. NAWSA Hesitance Anna Howard Shaw, c. 1910

  17. Suffrageparade of 1913

  18. Suffragists split Womanhood & Citizenship: ► Generations ► Strategy ► Tactics

  19. NAWSA TACTICS Carrie Chapman Catt, c. 1915

  20. NWP Tactics

  21. Picketing begins ► First pickets outside White House in January 1917 ► “Silent Sentinels” with banners ►More controversial after WWI declared in April

  22. Arrests Begin

  23. Arrests continue

  24. Arrest & Prison ► Lucy Burns most often arrested ► Prominent women in jail drew attention ► Nearly 200 eventually imprisoned

  25. Arrest & Prison

  26. Alice Paul in Prison ► Long sentence drew criticism ► Daily articles about AP condition ► Mental examination ► Pickets continued

  27. Release—Victory? ► All pickets released before Thanksgiving 1917 ► New York state had won suffrage in meantime ► Wilson declares support for constitutional amendment January 1918; House passes. ► Senate passes June 1919

  28. States Ratify

  29. 19th Amendment Ratified August 26, 1920

  30. Using Suffrage in classroom Themes: • Women moving into public life esp. after 1870 • Suffrage part of Progressive reforms • Using publicity to get results • Consumer society: creating posters, small goods to gain support, advertise. • What’s worth going to jail for?

  31. Class activities ► Create posters, broadsides incorporating favorite images and persuasive techniques ► Examine posters, etc. for symbolic content and connect to suffrage

  32. Suffrage Art

  33. Other activities ► Using suffrage songs to sing; create new; examine means of persuasion. ► Examine supporters/non-supporters of suffrage as a window on society pre-WWI. ►Use controversy over picketing to talk about meaning of patriotism.

  34. Questions?