LEO-15 Records Remote Sensing, Meteorological and In Situ Ocean Data From the Eye of Hurricane Floyd - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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LEO-15 Records Remote Sensing, Meteorological and In Situ Ocean Data From the Eye of Hurricane Floyd

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LEO-15 Records Remote Sensing, Meteorological and In Situ Ocean Data From the Eye of Hurricane Floyd
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LEO-15 Records Remote Sensing, Meteorological and In Situ Ocean Data From the Eye of Hurricane Floyd

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  1. LEO-15 Records Remote Sensing, Meteorological and In Situ Ocean Data From the Eye of Hurricane Floyd Mike Crowley, Scott Glenn, John Fracassi, Josh Kohut Inst. of Marine and Coastal Sciences, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, N.J. James Eberwine - National Weather Service, Mount Holly, N.J.

  2. Floyd and a cold front merge to flood the northeast...

  3. The Longterm Ecosystem Observatory - LEO-15 Instruments Used to Gather Data From Floyd AVHRR RADARSAT SeaWiFS AVIRIS GPS/DDA Altimneter Microwave Salinity Scanner

  4. Floyd Hits the New Jersey Coast

  5. Wave Height (m) 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 September Meteorological Data from the New Jersey Coast 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 Wind Speeds (m/s) 1 m/s = 1.9 mph Wave Height 4.2 3.6 3.0 2.4 1.8 1.2 0.6

  6. 12 11 10 9 Water Depth (m) Wave Height (m) Temperature (C) Peak Period (s) 8 7 6 5 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 September 14 15 16 17 18 19 September 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 September 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 September Underwater Data from the New Jersey Coast Peak Wave Period Pressure 13.1 12.8 12.5 12.2 11.9 11.6 Wave Height Bottom Temperature 4.2 3.6 22.5 3.0 22.2 2.4 21.95 1.8 1.2 21.7 0.6

  7. Before Floyd Near the Eye of Floyd Near the Before Eye of Floyd CODAR CODAR Antenna Antenna Floyd Great Great Bay Bay Nodes Nodes Nodes CODAR CODAR Antenna Antenna Filtered Sea-Level Comparisons Virginia Delaware Cape May Atlantic City LEO Node Sandy Hook Montauk After Floyd After V Floyd CODAR Antenna S D A C Great Bay Nodes M L CODAR Antenna

  8. Node A ADCP: Cross-Shore Velocities and Sea Surface Height Node A ADCP: Along-Shore Velocities and Sea Surface Height

  9. Phytoplankton Increases as a Result of Floyd’s Winds

  10. All this real-time data from a hurricane is cool, but... These data sets and images are very interesting and important for scientific research, but the reality of a hurricane is devastation. North Carolina was hardest hit, but New Jersey also suffered some serious damage. Approximately $250 million in damages affected more than half the state’s population, which made it the single most costly disaster in the history of the state. The town of Bound Brook had multiple fires from electrical shorts (below), yet was buried under 10 feet of water. Downtown New Brunswick (right) was closed Courtesy of the NWS for 2 days following the Storm. Here’s a summary of some of the damages: 1) 4 people dead 2) 10,000 evacuated 3) 31,000 with no power for 1 week or more 4) 30,000 with no water for at least 4 days 5) 1.3 million must boil drinking water for three weeks Courtesy CNN.com