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Parenting Styles. By: Cheryl Breck. Today I will Talk About ~. Definition of Parenting Styles Tell you about the different Parenting Styles How children tend to be with each of these Parenting Styles

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parenting styles

ParentingStyles

By:

Cheryl Breck

today i will talk about
Today I will Talk About ~
  • Definition of Parenting Styles
  • Tell you about the different Parenting Styles
  • How children tend to be with each of these Parenting Styles
  • How we, as teachers, should be when we have children in our classrooms from these different Parenting Styles
definition
Definition
  • The general pattern of behaviors that a parent uses to raise his or her children.
there are four different parenting styles
There Are Four Different Parenting Styles
  • Authoritative ~ Democratic or Balanced: High Love and High Limits
  • Authoritarian~ Love Love and High Limits
different parenting styles cont
Different Parenting Styles (Cont.)
  • Permissive ~ High Love and Low Limits
  • Uninvolved ~ Rejecting/Neglecting: Low Love and Low Limits
authoritative parents
Authoritative Parents
  • Provide a loving, supportive, home environment.
  • Hold high expectations and standards for their children’s behaviors.
  • Enforce household rules consistently.
  • Explain why some behaviors are acceptable and others are not.
  • Include children in family decision making.
authoritarian parents
Authoritarian Parents
  • Convey less emotional warmth than authoritative parents.
  • Hold high expectations and standards for their children’s behaviors.
  • Establish rules of behavior without regard for the children’s needs.
  • Expect rules to be obeyed without question.
  • Allow little give-and-take in parent-child discussions.
permissive parents
Permissive Parents
  • Provide a loving, supportive, home environment.
  • Hold few expectations or standards for their children’s behaviors.
  • Rarely punish inappropriate behavior.
  • Allow their children to make many of their own decisions (for example: about eating, bedtime, etc.).
uninvolved parents
Uninvolved Parents
  • Provide little if any emotional support for their children.
  • Hold few expectations or standards for their children’s behaviors.
  • Have little interest in their children’s lives.
  • Seem overwhelmed by their own problems.
children of authoritative parents tend to be
Children of Authoritative Parents Tend to be:
  • Happy
  • Self-confident
  • Curious
  • Independent
  • Likable
  • Respectful of others
  • Successful in school
children of authoritarian parents tend to be
Children of Authoritarian Parents Tend to be:
  • Unhappy
  • Anxious
  • Low in self-confidence
  • Lacking initiative
  • Dependent on others
  • Lacking in social skills and altruistic behaviors
  • Coercive in dealing with others
  • Defiant
children of permissive parents tend to be
Children of Permissive Parents Tend to be:
  • Selfish
  • Unmotivated
  • Dependent on others
  • Demanding of attention
  • Disobedient
  • Impulsive
children of uninvolved parents tend to be
Children of Uninvolved Parents Tend to be:
  • Disobedient
  • Demanding
  • Low in self-control
  • Low in tolerance for frustration
  • Lacking long-term goals
as teachers we should
As Teachers We Should…
  • Authoritative ~

A). Adopt an authoritative

style similar to that of

their parents

as teachers we should1
As Teachers We Should…
  • Authoritarian ~

A). Adopt an authoritative style,

similar to that of their parents with

particular emphasis on:

a). Conveying emotional warmth

b). Soliciting students’ perspectives on

classroom rules and procedures

c). Considering students’ needs in

developing classroom rules

as teachers we should2
As Teachers We Should…
  • Permissive ~

A). Adopt an authoritative style,

with particular emphasis on:

a). Holding high expectations for

behavior

b). Imposing consequences for

inappropriate behavior

as teachers we should3
As Teachers We Should…
  • Uninvolved ~

A). Adopt an authoritative style, with

particular emphasis on:

a). Conveying emotional warmth

b). Holding high expectations for

behavior

c). Imposing consequences for

inappropriate behavior

summary
Summary…
  • Definition of Parenting Styles
  • Told you about the different Parenting Styles
  • How the children tend to be with each of the Parenting Styles
  • How we, as teachers, should be when we have children in our classrooms from these different Parenting Styles
links about parenting styles
Links about Parenting Styles
  • www.parentingtoolbox.com/pstyle1.html
  • www.kidsource.com/better.world.press/parenting.html
  • www.unt.edu/spe/module1/blk2styl.htm
  • http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/hstein/parentin.htm
resources
Resources
  • Huxley, Ron, LMFT. Hand Tools: Parenting Education: The Four Parenting Styles. 22. Jan. 2004. www.parentingtoolbox.com/pstyle1.html
  • Omrod, Jeanne Ellis. 2000. Third Edition. Educational Psychology: Developing Learners. Merrill and imprint of Prentice Hall. Columbus, Ohio