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Upgrading the “ e ” in e Learning from Electronic to Engaged SUSAN E. METROS Professor, Design Technology Deputy Chief Information Officer Executive Director for eLearning The Ohio State University Interface Agenda eLearning Engagement Academy/Knowledge

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slide1

Upgrading the “e” in eLearning from Electronic to Engaged

SUSAN E. METROS

Professor, Design Technology

Deputy Chief Information Officer

Executive Director for eLearning

The Ohio State University

agenda
Interface Agenda

eLearning

Engagement

Academy/Knowledge

engagement continuum
To be engaged is to be enticed into interacting

The more attentive the user is to the task, the more complete the engagement

The goal is to “crank up” the engagement continuum

  • Passive Interest
  • Dynamic Interaction
  • Flow
Engagement Continuum
examining engagement
Examining Engagement
  • Engagement examined from cognitive, semiotic, psychological, artistic and pedagogical perspectives
    • Theatre (Laurel,1993)
    • Live Performance (Bilson,1995)
    • Interface Engagement (Metros,1999)
computers as theatre
Interface as a stage for performing tasks in which both humans and computers have a roleComputers as Theatre

HamletClarence Brown Theatre and Knoxville Symphony Orchestra

live performance
Audience reaction to and participation in live performance

Theatre and Performance

Parades and Demonstrations

Music

Organized Religion

School

Live Performance

Marti Gras ParadeKrewe of Endymion, NOLAlive Photo/Alex Oliver,http://www.nola.com/mardigras/

interface engagement
Interface Engagement
  • Examined traditional theories and practices of performing arts, communication, art and design
  • Recast them into six engagement processes
      • Suspending Disbelief
      • Making Believe
      • Creating Ambiguity
      • Stimulating Senses
      • Altering Perception
      • Evoking Passion
suspending disbelief samuel taylor coleridge
Temporarily suspends knowledge that something is pretend

Frees viewer to use imagination without fearing reprisal

Suspending Disbelief (Samuel Taylor Coleridge)

Postal2Multiplayer PC Game

Running with Scissors, 2003

http://www.gopostal.com

suspending disbelief samuel taylor coleridge9
Temporarily suspends knowledge that something is pretend

Frees viewer to use imagination without fearing reprisal

Very different response if situation is real

Suspending Disbelief (Samuel Taylor Coleridge)

Van Nuys Shooting

Court TVOctober 31, 2003

www.courttv.com/news/2003/1105/courthouseshooting_ap.html

2 making believe
“Every child is an artist. The problem is how to remain an artist after he [or she] grows up.”

Picasso

2. Making Believe

The Palace

Palacetools.com, 2003 http://thepalace.com

3 creating ambiguity
Gestalt perceptual principles of design

Humans drawn to solve or “make right” ambiguous situations

3. Creating Ambiguity
  • American Honda Motor Company©1998 American Honda Motor Co., Inc.
  • http://www.honda.com/
4 stimulating senses
Visual

Verbal

Gestural

Auditory

Olfactory

Tactile

Intuitive

Atmospheric

Kinesthetic

4. Stimulating Senses

NICE: Narrative Immersive Collaborative Environment

University of Illinois at Chicago

http://www.evl.uic.edu/tile/NICE/NICE/intro.html

4 stimulating senses13
Visual

Verbal

Gestural

Auditory

Olfactory

Tactile

Intuitive

Atmospheric

Kinesthetic

4. Stimulating Senses

Winston Stone, Two and a half years old

5 altering perception
Computer or PDA

Window constrained to the dimensions of the static display, predefined scrollable area

5. Altering Perception
5 altering perception15
Television or Film

Window mapped onto an expanse of infinite space rich with texture, activity, and multi-sensory clues

5. Altering Perception
5 altering perception16
5. Altering Perception

Visual Thesaurus Plumb Design

http://www.visualthesaurus.com/online/index.html

6 evoking passion
An expression of intense feelings6. Evoking Passion

[RE]collections + collections(Metros, 2000)

http://itc.utk.edu/WWII

engaged learning
Engaged Learning

Continuum

Transfer

Translate

Transcend

Engagement

Continuum

Passive Interest

Dynamic Interaction

Flow

Engaged Learning
engaged learning19
Engaged Learning

Transfer

Transform

Transcend

Main Entry: trans-

Function: prefix

Etymology: Latin trans-, tra- across, beyond, through, so as to change, from trans across, beyond -- more at THROUGH

1 : on or to the other side of : across : beyond

nsse indicators of effective educational practice
NSSE Indicators of Effective Educational Practice
  • Level of academic challenge
  • Active and collaborative learning
  • Student-faculty interaction
  • Enriching educational experiences
  • Supportive campus environment
the evolution of an engaged academy
Old Model

New Model

The Evolution of anEngaged Academy

Curriculum

Text-based

Stand-alone experience

Discipline-based

Individual development

Instructor-led

One size fits all

Boundary constrained

Slow to change

Knowledge hoarded

Learning solution

Multimodal

Bridged and lifelong learning

Disciplined-blended

Problem-solving teams

Learner-centered

Individual focus

Unbounded

Quick to respond

Knowledge shared

engaged learning23
Engaged Learning

Transfer

Transform

Transcend

Transact

Transmit

Main Entry: trans-

Function: prefix

Etymology: Latin trans-, tra- across, beyond, through, so as to change, from trans across, beyond -- more at THROUGH

1 : on or to the other side of : across : beyond

the academy transferring

Knowledge

Discipline A

Discipline B

The Academy Transferring

Knowledge

Knowledge

Knowledge

Discipline C

Discipline C

the academy transforming

Knowledge

Discipline A

Discipline B

The Academy Transforming

Knowledge

Knowledge

Discipline C

Discipline C

the academy transcending

Knowledge

The Academy Transcending

Knowledge

Knowledge

Discipline B

Discipline C

Discipline C

Discipline A

the academy transacting

Knowledge

Discipline A

The Academy Transacting

Knowledge

Knowledge

The Academy

Discipline B

Discipline C

the academy transmitting

Knowledge

Knowledge

Knowledge

Knowledge

Knowledge

Knowledge

Knowledge

Knowledge

Knowledge

The Academy Transmitting

Industry

Academy

K-12

Discipline A

Discipline C

Discipline C

Discipline A

Discipline B

Discipline B

Discipline B

Discipline A

Discipline C

summary
Interface

Suspending Disbelief

Making Believe

Creating Ambiguity

Stimulating Senses

Altering Perception

Evoking Passion

Summary

eLearning

  • Transfer
  • Transform
  • Transcend

Engagement

  • Passive Interest
  • Dynamic Interaction
  • Flow

Academy/Knowledge

  • Transact
  • Transmit
summary31
Summary

The central purpose of technology is to connect–

–to make contact. To wake up, shocked by the voltage of increased interaction between the properties of humanity in my heart and those in yours–

–to be whole.

(Barlow, 1995)

to make contact
To Make Contact

SUSAN E. METROS

Professor, Design Technology

Deputy Chief Information Officer

Executive Director for eLearning

The Ohio State University

Technology Enhanced Learning & Research

Columbus, Ohio USA

metros.1@osu.edu

bibliography
Bibliography
  • J. Perry Barlow, (1995), “It’s a Poor Workman who Blames his Tools,” Wired. Scenario Special 3, No. 11, 120-142.
  • A. J. Bilson, (1995),“Get into the Groove: Designing for Participation,” Interactions 2, No. 2, 17-22.
  • M. Csikszentmihalyi, (1990),. Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience, New York: Harper and Row.
  • M. Csikszentmihalyi, (1998), Finding Flow: The Psychology of Engagement with Everyday Life, New York: Basic Books.
  • B. Laurel, (1993), Computers as Theatre, Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, Inc., pp. 113 and 115.
  • S. Metros, (1999), “Making Connections: A Model for Online Interaction,” Leonardo: Journal of the International Society for the Arts Sciences and Technology, Vol. 32, No. 4, pp. 281-291, MIT Press: Cambridge, MA.
  • National Survey of Student Engagement (2002), Indiana University, p. 6. www.iub.edu/~nsse/html/report-2002.shtml
  • M. K. Smith, (2001), “Peter Senge and the Learning Organization,” The Encyclopedia of Informal Education, www.infed.org/thinkers/senge.htm
  • E. Tufte, (1994), Envisioning Information, Cheshire, CT:Graphics Press.