Industrial security awareness seminar february 21 2007 njit
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INDUSTRIAL SECURITY AWARENESS SEMINAR FEBRUARY 21, 2007 - NJIT. PUTTING TOGETHER AN EFFECTIVE SECURITY PLAN G. ELSNER INFINEUM USA L.P. RATIONALE. Security has been in the limelight since 9/11. Chemical process industry could be a target.

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Industrial security awareness seminar february 21 2007 njit

INDUSTRIAL SECURITY AWARENESS SEMINAR FEBRUARY 21, 2007 - NJIT

PUTTING TOGETHER AN EFFECTIVE SECURITY PLAN

G. ELSNER

INFINEUM USA L.P.


Rationale
RATIONALE

  • Security has been in the limelight since 9/11.

  • Chemical process industry could be a target.

  • Government agencies and industry networks heavily involved in enhancing security of critical infrastructure.

    • Information

    • Tools

    • Buffer zone protection plans

    • Regulations

    • Guidance documents

  • Managers are being flooded with information.

  • Security is everyone’s business.


Objective
OBJECTIVE

  • Develop and implement an effective security plan.

    • Prevent incidents that could impact employees, equipment, public at large and ultimately the business.

  • Establish a broad-based frame work of communication, awareness and preparedness.

    • Everyone has a role and responsibility in the plan.


Key elements of a security plan
KEY ELEMENTS OF A SECURITY PLAN

  • Security organization and communication network

  • Operation plan and security advisory system

  • Threat assessment and communication

  • Security vulnerability assessment

  • Countermeasures and self-assessment

  • Security drills and preparedness

  • Awareness training


Organization and communication
ORGANIZATION AND COMMUNICATION

  • Security is no longer limited to vandalism and theft.

    • It should be integrated into your site’s Health, Safety, and Environmental (HSE) program.

  • Focal point of contact

    • Communication with other functional groups.

    • Interaction with government and law enforcement agencies (local, state and federal)

      • Regulatory requirements

      • Intelligence data interpretation

    • Interaction with industry networks

      • Guidance

      • Voluntary programs

      • Best practices

      • Technology


Operations plans and homeland security advisory system hsas
OPERATIONS’ PLANS AND HOMELAND SECURITY ADVISORY SYSTEM (HSAS)

  • Remain vigilant and prepared at all threat conditions

    • HSAS system based on increasing risk of terrorist attack.

    • Suggested protective measures for each threat condition level.

    • Agency-specific protective measures based on intel data.


Operations plans and homeland security advisory system hsas cont d
OPERATIONS’ PLANS AND HOMELAND SECURITY ADVISORY SYSTEM (HSAS) (Cont’d.)

  • Site specific response plan

    • Fundamental countermeasures in place all the time

      • Access control

      • Background checks

      • Fencing

    • Activated security countermeasures based on threat level

      • Surveillance cameras monitoring on a more frequent basis

      • Visitor escorts

      • Vehicular inspections

      • Additional police rounds

    • Activated operational process countermeasures based on elevated threat level

      • Unit shutdowns

      • Depletion of inventory

      • Relocation of hazardous materials


Regulatory overview and industry association requirements
REGULATORY OVERVIEW AND INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION REQUIREMENTS (HSAS) (Cont’d.)

  • U.S. Coast Guard Maritime Security (MARSEC)

    • Additional security on the shipping and petrochemical industry

    • MARSEC security levels or directives issued when additional security measures are required to respond to threat assessments.

  • Department of Transportation (DOT) Security Requirements for Hazardous Materials Transportation (HM-232)

    • New requirements to enhance the security of hazardous materials.

    • Shippers of certain highly hazardous materials and shipments of such that require placarding must develop and implement security plans.

    • Training of employees shipping hazardous materials must include security components.


Regulatory overview and industry association requirements cont d
REGULATORY OVERVIEW AND INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION REQUIREMENTS (Cont’d.)

  • Best practices Standards at TCPA/DPCC Chemical Sector Facilities

    • Conduct a Security Vulnerability Assessment (SVA)

    • Develop a prevention, preparedness and response plan that reflect the status of all the best practices identified by the Domestic Security Preparedness Task Force.

    • Review of the practicability and the potential for adopting inherently safer technology.


Regulatory overview and industry association requirements cont d1
REGULATORY OVERVIEW AND INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION REQUIREMENTS (Cont’d.)

  • American Chemistry Council Security Code of Management

    • Leadership commitment to security

    • Analysis of potential security threats and vulnerability (SVA)

    • Implementation of security measures

    • Protection of information systems (cyber security).

    • Documentation of securing management programs, processes and procedures.

    • Training, drills and guidance.

    • Communication with stakeholders.

    • Third party verification of countermeasures.


Security legislation in progress
SECURITY LEGISLATION IN PROGRESS (Cont’d.)

  • Section 550 of the Homeland Security Appropriation Act of 2007 – 6 CFR Part 27

    • Provides DHS with the authority to regulate the security of high risk chemical facilities.

    • Chemical facilities fitting a risk profile would complete a screening phase.

    • “High risk” facilities would be required to prepare and submit an SVA and a security plan.

    • The Department would review submissions for compliance with risk-based standards (proposed 6 CFR Part 27.230).

      • The Department or 3rd party auditor would follow up with a site inspection and audit.

      • Deficiencies would be addressed by further consultation with the Department.


Security legislation in progress cont d
SECURITY LEGISLATION IN PROGRESS (cont’d.) (Cont’d.)

  • Rail Transportation Security – 49 CFR Parts 1520 and 1580

    • Broad scope aimed at nation’s rail transportation system and rail operations at certain, fixed site facilities that ship or receive specified hazardous materials by rail.

      • Allows TSA to enhance risk security and coordinate its activities with other Federal agencies.

    • Requires that regulated facilities allow TSA and DHS to inspect facilities and records relevant to risk security.

    • Regulated parties must designate risk security coordinators and report significant security concerns to DHS.

    • Freight rail carriers and certain facilities handling hazardous materials must be equipped to report location and shipping information to TSA upon request.

      • Facilities must also implement chain of custody to ensure positive and secure exchange of hazardous materials.


Threat assessment and communication
THREAT ASSESSMENT AND COMMUNICATION (Cont’d.)

  • Assessment of potential terrorist threats focuses on a similar approach to that used to assess process safety risks.

    • Hazard identification

      • Assets or hazards that could be targets of terrorist acts.

    • Potential consequences due to security compromise

      • Assets, community, corporate impact, economic impact.


Threat assessment and communication cont d
THREAT ASSESSMENT AND COMMUNICATION (Cont’d.) (Cont’d.)

  • Risk assessment

  • Risk control factors based on assessment

  • Communication with law enforcement, coordination via regional advisors, and interaction with security industry networks validates threat scenarios.


  • Security vulnerability assessments sva
    SECURITY VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENTS (SVA) (Cont’d.)

    • Better understanding of security risks and identification of security of weaknesses

    • Effort is accomplished by conducting an analysis of assets and scenarios.

      • Define security hazards

      • Identify and assess threats

      • Define potential vulnerabilities

      • Evaluate countermeasures

    • Deliverable includes potential scenarios, what needs to be protected based on risk and what countermeasures need to be implemented to reduce the risk.


    Security countermeasures
    SECURITY COUNTERMEASURES (Cont’d.)

    • Based on the type and location of a threat.

      • Internal (permanent employee, temporary employee, contractor, visitor)

      • External (vehicle with explosive device, firearm, process control system breach)

    • Types

      • Human

      • Physical

      • Information Technology

    • Guidance

      • N.J. Domestic Security Preparedness Task Force – Best Practices

      • Site security guidelines (ACC)

      • Chemical Industry Data Exchange (CIDX) – Cyber Security


    Security preparedness
    SECURITY PREPAREDNESS (Cont’d.)

    • Emergency response plans

      • Understand site hazards and response strategy

    • Awareness training

      • Security is everyone’s business

      • Understand your role in security plan

    • Security drills

      • Actions to be taken based on alert levels and threat information.

      • Communication with agencies, employees, law enforcement, OEMs.


    Security preparedness cont d
    SECURITY PREPAREDNESS (Cont’d.) (Cont’d.)

    • Systems, procedures, countermeasures, self assessments

      • Verify the integrity of your physical countermeasures

    • Communication

    • Coordinate with local, site and federal services on threat assessments, countermeasures, guidance.