A Presentation to Senate Judiciary B And Judiciary C Committees February 15, 2000 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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A Presentation to Senate Judiciary B And Judiciary C Committees February 15, 2000 PowerPoint Presentation
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A Presentation to Senate Judiciary B And Judiciary C Committees February 15, 2000

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A Presentation to Senate Judiciary B And Judiciary C Committees February 15, 2000
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A Presentation to Senate Judiciary B And Judiciary C Committees February 15, 2000

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  1. Department of Corrections Overview A Presentation to Senate Judiciary B And Judiciary C Committees February 15, 2000 Kari Belvin, Senate Fiscal Services Chris Keaton, Legislative Fiscal Office

  2. Major Components of Corrections Adult Corrections Juvenile Corrections Probation and Parole Prison Enterprises

  3. Corrections Budget

  4. Department of Corrections 1999-00 Budget Administration $26 million Adult Institutions $268 million Office of Youth Development $103 million Probation and Parole $35 million Rehabilitation $3 million Sheriffs’ Housing of State Inmates $137 million Total Budget $572 million

  5. The following chart shows the growth of the Corrections budget over the past four years. • For FY 00, the budget stands at about $572 m. • The blue bar on the chart shows the portion of the Corrections budget which comes from the State General Fund. • Over the four-year period shown, the SGF portion of the Corrections budget has averaged over 90 percent each year.

  6. SGF Portion of Corrections Budget In Millions

  7. Corrections Expenditures

  8. Adult Correctional Institutions David Wade Winn WTF-North Washington Avoyelles LSP Dixon C. Paul Phelps Allen LCIW Hunt Public Private

  9. Inst. Bud. Cap. Inst. Bud. Cap. Winn $15.5 1,538 LSP $83.5 5,108 Allen $15.0 1,538 Hunt $35.0 2,176 Phelps $14.1 805 Wade $26.5 1,474 LCIW $13.4 900 DCI $24.1 1,618 Wash $17.7 1,212 WTFN $6.2 500 Total $267.5 18,407 Avoy $16.5 1,538 Adult Institutions

  10. Sentencing Reform And Truth-In-Sentencing

  11. Moves Toward Sentencing Reform • Truth-In-Sentencing is the latest in a trend of reform actions dating back to the 1970’s. • During the early 70’s, indeterminate sentencing was common as parole boards had the authority to release offenders from prison. • States later employed determinate sentencing whereby inmates served fixed prison terms that could be reduced by good-time or earned-time credits. • A move was later initiated to use mandatory minimum sentences, which required that offenders be sentenced to a specific amount of time. • Sentencing guidelines also came into the picture as states established sentencing commissions and created ranges of sentences for certain offenses and offender characteristics.

  12. Truth-In-Sentencing: An Overview • Truth-In-Sentencing follows this reform trend and is designed to keep violent offenders in prison longer by requiring them to serve a larger percentage of their sentence. • The first Truth-In-Sentencing laws were enacted in 1984. Under TIS, parole eligibility and good-time credits are reduced or eliminated. • Under TIS, prison populations have increased nationwide as offenders are being held longer. In 1994, Congress authorized funding for additional state prisons and jails through the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act (VOI/TIS funds). • Incentive grants may also be awarded to states which meet the eligibility criteria for the TIS program. Louisiana meets the 85-percent federal requirement.

  13. Truth-In-Sentencing: Impact and Observations • The impact of TIS has been dramatic. For example, statistics from the U.S. Office of Justice Programs shows that violent offenders released from prison in 1996 were sentenced to serve an average of 85 months in prison. Prior to release, they served about half of their prison sentence or 45 months. [Sentenced BEFORE TIS] • Under TIS laws requiring 85 percent of the sentence, violent offenders would serve an average of 88 months in prison based on the average sentence of 104 months for violent offenders admitted to prison in 1996. • The number of inmates held in state prisons increased 60 percent between 1990 and 1997, and the number admitted to prison increased by 17 percent. • Over a third of prison admissions in 1997 were parole violators. Two-thirds of these violators were drug or property offenders.

  14. Population Trends and Projections

  15. Adult Inmate Population Growth • The next chart illustrates a brief history of the most • significant dynamic in Corrections — growth of • the offender population. • The number of incarcerated adult inmates grew by nearly five times from FY 80 to FY 00 — from nearly 7,500 to almost 36,400. • This growth trend is projected to continue into • the future.

  16. Adult Inmate Population Growth FY80 FY85 FY90 FY95 FY00 State 6,601 10,303 12,755 15,725 21,901 Local 821 2,725 4,445 8,039 14,459 TOTAL 7,422 13,028 17,200 23,764 36,360 % Change ----- +76% +32% +38% +53% *Select facilities are at 100% capacity with double bunking.

  17. Incarcerated Adult Population Trend

  18. Incarceration Rates • Louisiana incarcerates 766 inmates per 100,000 population. • This ranks as one of the highest incarceration rates in the nation.

  19. Sheriffs’ Housing Of State Inmates

  20. Currently, about $137.5 million is budgeted for Sheriffs’ • Housing of State Inmates. • Corrections estimates annual increases in Sheriffs’ • Housing to be about $20 million per year (at existing per • diem rate). Adding $1 to the per diem adds an extra • $6 million per year. • Approximately 43 percent of all state inmates are housed • in local facilities in Louisiana. • Louisiana is the only state in the South with such high • percentage and population levels. The next closest state • is Tennessee, which houses 26 percent of its state inmates • in local jails. The Southern average is about 4 to 6 percent.

  21. Sheriffs’ Housing of State Inmates Sheriffs’ Per Diem is currently $23, as a result of the 1999 Legislative Session. In Millions

  22. Why does Louisiana place so many inmates in local jails when other states don’t?

  23. It’s Cheaper. $38 per day in a state facility vs. $23 per day in a local jail (And this doesn’t even include capital costs.)

  24. Avg. Cost Per Day Per Offender Average Daily Cost Per Inmate Bed In Adult Facilities (LESS Administrative, Health Care, and Vo-Tech Costs) $38.29 Average Daily Cost Per Inmate Bed In Adult Facilities (WITH Administrative, Health Care, and Vo-Tech Costs) $41.65 $23 per day in a local jail

  25. Population and Budget Projections

  26. The next chart shows the projected future growth of the adult inmate population. • If this projection is accurate, by FY 05 the state • could have an inmate population which has nearly • doubled in size since FY 95. • Why? The state is not only locking up more offenders, it is also housing inmates for longer periods of time. • As long as the inmate population continues to rise, • the Corrections budget will continue to grow.

  27. Adult Population Projection

  28. The next chart shows the projected operating cost for • Corrections based on anticipated inmate population • increase to FY 03. • The bar for FY 01 is higher than the other years shown because Corrections is to receive nearly $27 million in federal funding for capital construction at Hunt Correctional Center ... • … This funding will allow Corrections to place more • inmates at Hunt. Since it costs the state more to house offenders at state institutions, the operating costs will be higher for that year. • This chart shows figures on a per-year basis. The • four-year cumulative total is $89.6 million.

  29. New Operating Cost Projection In Millions

  30. The next chart shows new capital cost projections, including • the anticipated increase in federal funding for FY 01 which • was mentioned previously. • The most significant state funding occurs in FY 03. • Corrections has indicated it will request $24.2 million • in funding for FY 03 capital projects in the FY 01 • Capital Outlay Request. • This money will be used for a projected expansion of • 1,102 new beds spread over seven facilities in FY 03. • The cumulative total projected new capital costs, both state • and federal, is $83.5 million over the four-year period. • (63 percent federal, 37 percent state).

  31. New Capital Cost Projection In Millions

  32. Other Considerations

  33. Recidivism Rates (5 years after release) Adult Corrections 50.1% Impact Graduates 48.0% Work Release 45.6% Blue Walters Graduates 54.4%

  34. Correctional Officer Salaries Louisiana Starting Salary : $15,324 Avg. Starting Salary in Southern States: $19,605 14% Across The Board Increase for LA Correctional Officers: $21 million Turnover Rate: 40%

  35. Department of Corrections Overview A Presentation to Senate Judiciary B And Judiciary C Committees February 15, 2000 Kari Belvin, Senate Fiscal Services Chris Keaton, Legislative Fiscal Office