slide1 l.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
CS 14: Engaging Business Majors in General Education Science Courses. Fred D. Ledley , Professor and Chair of Natural a PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
CS 14: Engaging Business Majors in General Education Science Courses. Fred D. Ledley , Professor and Chair of Natural a

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 31

CS 14: Engaging Business Majors in General Education Science Courses. Fred D. Ledley , Professor and Chair of Natural a - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 273 Views
  • Uploaded on

CS 14: Engaging Business Majors in General Education Science Courses. Fred D. Ledley , Professor and Chair of Natural and Applied Sciences—Bentley University Stephen S. Holt , Professor and Director of Natural Sciences—Babson College

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'CS 14: Engaging Business Majors in General Education Science Courses. Fred D. Ledley , Professor and Chair of Natural a' - benjamin


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
slide1

CS 14: Engaging Business Majors in General Education Science Courses.

Fred D. Ledley, Professor and Chair of Natural and Applied Sciences—Bentley University

Stephen S. Holt, Professor and Director of Natural Sciences—Babson College

science education for students majoring in business disciplines the issue
Science education for students majoring in business disciplines: the issue
  • Rising Above the Gathering Storm: Energizing and Employing America for a Brighter Economic Future (NAS, 2006) and other reports argue that greater scientific and technical competency is essential for the success of American companies in the global economy
  • Primary focus has been on building a work force of scientists, technologists, engineers, and mathematicians to drive innovation in academia and industry
  • Little attention has been directed at the literacy of non-scientists in who influence the direction of science and innovation and provide critical support for innovation-based companies through roles in industry, government, or NGOs.
science education for students majoring in business disciplines the issue3
Science education for students majoring in business disciplines: the issue
  • Industry funds more scientific research than government or NGOs, in addition to traditional development activity (National Patterns of R&D Resources, NSF).
  • Business graduates represent >20% of all undergraduates (Digest of Education Statistics, NCES, 2007).
  • Innovation-based companies require informed business leadership for management, finance, marketing, etc.
  • Decisions made in science and technology-driven industries will influence the direction of science and innovation.

No data is available on how much science education students are receiving in business schools.

science education for students majoring in business disciplines the project
Science education for students majoring in business disciplines: the project
  • How much science education is required of students completing BS degrees in business?
  • Identify science requirement for 59 schools listed in Business Week ranking of “top 50 business schools” within the last three years
  • Data from web sites of business schools and parent institutions
  • Data confirmed by telephone calls to advising office
science education for students majoring in business disciplines the data
Science education for students majoring in business disciplines: the data
  • Few business school catalogues or web sites address requirements for graduation. Many refer to general education requirements of parent institution.
  • “Stated” science requirement determined by reviewing requirements for graduation with B.S. in business discipline.
  • “Natural science” requirement determined as the minimum number of required courses in traditional science disciplines including astronomy, biology, chemistry, physics, earth science, but excluding psychology, math, economics, etc.
science education for students majoring in business disciplines schools
Science education for students majoring in business disciplines: schools

# schools=59

public=22, private (religious)=11, private (not religious)=26

Length of business program:

2 year=16, 3 year=3, 4 year=40

students in institution:

mean=20,582, median=14,500

students in business school:

mean= 1,800, median=1,727

students in business class (calculated students/years):

mean=535, median= 463

slide7

Stated Science and Natural Science

Requirement in Public and Private Schools

preliminary conclusions
Preliminary Conclusions
  • 2/59 top business schools have no stated science requirement
  • 11/59 top business schools allow students to graduate with no natural science courses
  • 31/59 top business schools require no laboratory science
  • Business schools at private institutions have fewer stated science requirements than public institutions
  • Business schools at private institutions with religious affiliations have fewest stated science requirements
  • No significant differences in minimum number of natural science courses among institutions studied
slide9

Science education for students majoring in business disciplines: questions

  • Is this enough?
    • Miller: college-level science courses critical in maintaining high level of scientific literacy
  • Is this curriculum on point?
    • Do courses designed for students in STEM subjects or students majoring in liberal arts/humanities meet the business needs of innovation driven industries?
    • Do these courses take advantage of unique strengths of business students in math, IT

More research is required to understand how college-level science education for business students can best serve the needs of innovation driven industries

general requirements

General Requirements

Two required semesters

1- Foundation Level

2- Intermediate Level

Electives generally require only Foundation

Level as pre-requisite

foundation level
Foundation Level
  • Three credit hours
  • Six two-hour labs integrated into each course
  • Can waive out with AP≥4 (or intro course transfer)
  • Includes learning goals in all basic sciences
  • Three thematic “flavors”
    • Search for Life in the Universe
    • Oceanography
    • History of the World, Part 1
intermediate level
Intermediate Level
  • Three credit hours
  • Six two-hour labs integrated into each course
  • Virtually impossible to waive out
  • Can use any Foundation Level as pre-req
  • Emphasis on specific applications/technologies
  • Three flavors:
    • Biotechnology
    • Electronic Technology
    • Environmental Technology
problems
Problems
  • Bi-modal student distribution: those that are interested and those that are “forced” to attend
  • First-year curriculum makes most students postpone Foundation Level to second year
  • Exposure to most basic principles is superficial
  • Students can postpone Intermediate until 4th year, so electives require only Foundation pre-req
  • Do business students value science more for business advantage or for education?
general education science requirements

General Education Science Requirements

One 4-credit, laboratory-based science course – discipline basedchoices in astronomy, chemistry, green biology, geology, human biology, and physics

One elective in math or natural science specialized applications of business interest. courses spanning boundary of science and business

science based concentrations in liberal studies major

Science-based concentrations in Liberal Studies Major

Second major - 95% students major in business disciplines)

Eight courses - at least 6 in A&S departments- no more than four in any one department- includes courses in general education core

E-portfolio

Mentoring

Culminating project

in its third year, the LSM (all concentrations) is thesecond most popular major at Bentley

retaining discipline focus in the core requirement example human biology

Retaining discipline focus in the core requirement: - example: human biology

COURSE GOALS

Be able to apply knowledge of basic biological mechanisms at the molecular level to an enhanced understanding of human health as well as developments in the biopharmaceutical and health care industry.

Recognize relevance of basic biological mechanisms at the nanoscale/molecular level in everyday life.

Understand the process of scientific discovery, scientific method, research, and development in contemporary human biology, translational medicine, and industry

provide students with scientific basis for Liberal Studies Major concentration

retaining discipline focus in the core requirement example human biology23

Retaining discipline focus in the core requirement: example human biology

Leverage strength of business students in math/IT, interest in personal health, and future applications in business

Novel content map based on minimum number of core biological concepts

1. Genomics

2. Biological pathways

3. Electricity

Select exemplary topics to expand on core concepts

Projects encourage students to apply core biological concepts to topics of personal interest.

survey respondents preliminary results

Survey Respondents(preliminary results)

Babson Faculty

Bentley Faculty

Meeting Registrants

questions for you
Questions for you…

How could the science curriculum of your institution or department best serve the needs of students majoring in business and pursuing business careers?