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Managing Higher Education Facilities

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  1. Managing Higher Education Facilities Alastair Blyth, OECD Programme on Education Building

  2. This Presentation Infrastructure Planning and Management in Higher Education Institutions • OECD • Higher Education in the 21st Century • Spatial and technological response • Post Occupancy Evaluation

  3. Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) OECD membership • The OECD has 30 member countries. • More than 70 developing and transition economies are engaged in working relationships with the OECD. • OECD is committed to pursuing pro-active strategies towards OECD non-member participation. OECD function • A forum in which governments work together to address the economic, social and environmental challenges of interdependence and globalisation.

  4. OECD Programme on Educational Building (PEB) PEB membership • 16 OECD Member countries and 12 associate members. PEB function • Monitors and evaluates facilities policy. • Promotes and disseminates good practice in design and management of educational buildings. PEB’s current activities: 2007-08 Programme of Work • Innovation in design to meet users’ needs. • Evaluation of procurement policy and practice for educational facilities. • School safety and security.

  5. OECD Programme on Educational Building (PEB) PEB outputs: International meetings and conferences. Topics of recent events have included Higher Education Facilities: Issues and Trends; Evaluating Quality in Educational Facilities. www.oecd.org/edu/facilities

  6. Infrastructure Planning and Management in Higher Education Institutions

  7. HE in the 21st Century Some indications: • ICT is an enabler – place and time • “Globalisation” and / or “Regionalisation” • Funding: public to private • Relationships with industry • Student expectations, quality of life – a significant driver

  8. The Facilities Patterns of Learning (Also research, teaching) Spatial Response Managing the Response

  9. Evolving Patterns of Learning and Knowledge Sharing Collaborative Immersive Mixed Anywhere

  10. Collaborative– a social activity Library: Saltire Centre, Glasgow Caledonian University, Scotland

  11. ImmersiveSimulation – or real world experience ? Simulator: National Maritime College, Ireland. Source: PEB Compendium 2006

  12. MixedFace-to-face mixed with on-line Georgetown University Law Center, Washington D.C. Source: PEB Compendium 2006

  13. Anywhere, anytime group;individual; wireless Georgetown University Law Center, Washington D.C. Source: PEB Compendium 2006

  14. Spatial Response Issues affecting spatial response • Consider flexibility • Physical flexibility • Technology - flexibility • Organisational flexibility • Balance of types of space • Timetabling • Better management

  15. Spatial Response Generic Space • Features: • Timetabled • Use by all • Constrained • Implications: • Manage timetable • Flexibility? • Expensive if mismanaged Lecture theatre, Kaposvari Egyetem, Kaposvar, Hungary Source: PEB Compendium 2006

  16. Spatial Response Specialised • Features: • Specific functions • Timetabled • Formal • Specialised equip. • Implications: • Inflexible • Expensive • Manage timetable Simulator: Dept. de Radiodiagnostic, Cegap de Sainte-Foy, Sainte-Foy, Canada Source: PEB Compendium 2006

  17. Spatial Response Informal • Features: • No timetable • Flexible • Use by anyone • Range of settings • Implications: • Hard to manage • Self-directed • Exchange space Haagse Hogeschool, The Hague, Netherlands Source: PEB Compendium 2006

  18. Managing the Spatial Response • Design space around human interaction • Supporting change through a responsive environment • Underpinned by robust information • Key questions might be: • How much space? • How is it being used? • When? • What is the need? • How is it being managed?

  19. Post Occupancy Evaluation (POE) Provides feedback on: Building performance and interaction with users Explores: • How users’ needs are changing • Building response – is it still appropriate Post Occupancy Evaluation Conceive Procure Occupy / manage Feed forwardExperience Conceive Procure Occupy / manage

  20. Post Occupancy Evaluation • Performance: • How does the building support the client and user need? What needs to be changed? • Product: • How well does the fabric achieve its predefined specification? What can be improved? • Process: • (Delivery or operational process) How did the team perform? How can we manage it better?

  21. Post Occupancy Evaluation Post Occupancy Evaluation: • Should be integral to infrastructure planning and management • Informs management of space • Is a basis for responding to organisational change • Provides feedback for the ´Brief´

  22. Post Occupancy Evaluation HE context • Long view Patterns of learning? Facilities response? (How is space used?) • Study activities through time • Questionnaire survey • Workshop … • Questionnaire • Energy use / CO2 / water use • Condition survey • Study space through time Strategic response? • Strategies to manage change • Speed of response?

  23. Conclusion • Patterns of learning, research and innovation are evolving • Space and technologies must be supportive • Manage the spatial response through information analysis • Space makes a difference to effectiveness and costs money

  24. THANK YOU Alastair Blyth Analyst, OECD Programme on Educational Building Alastair.Blyth@oecd.org www.oecd.org/edu/facilities