slide1 l.
Download
Skip this Video
Download Presentation
Clivages sociaux et clivages politiques en Europe Séance 9 : La dynamique générationnelle : de Ryder à Inglehart

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 24

Clivages sociaux et clivages politiques en Europe Séance 9 : La dynamique générationnelle : de Ryder à Inglehart - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 147 Views
  • Uploaded on

Clivages sociaux et clivages politiques en Europe Séance 9 : La dynamique générationnelle : de Ryder à Inglehart. Bruno Cautrès / Louis Chauvel bruno.cautres@sciences-po.fr / louis.chauvel@sciences-po.fr. Plan du cours : 1- Introduction (5 mars)

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Clivages sociaux et clivages politiques en Europe Séance 9 : La dynamique générationnelle : de Ryder à Inglehart' - base


Download Now An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
slide1
Clivages sociaux et clivages politiques en EuropeSéance 9 : La dynamique générationnelle : de Ryder à Inglehart

Bruno Cautrès / Louis Chauvel

bruno.cautres@sciences-po.fr / louis.chauvel@sciences-po.fr

slide2
Plan du cours :

1- Introduction (5 mars)

2- Grandes théories 1 (12 mars) : L’âge industriel : Marx, Halbwachs, Pareto, Schumpeter, Nisbet

3- Grandes théories 2 (19 mars) : l’âge postindustriel et le bouclage des représentations et des réalités Michelat et Simon, Clarke, Brooks et Manza, Hout…

4- Grandes théories 3 (26 mars) : Rokkan et la structuration territoriale des clivages

5- Présentation des thèmes des minimémoires (2 avril) / comment comparer  ?

6- Grandes théories 4 (9 avril) : Esping-Andersen et les structures sociales des Welfare regimes

7- Récapitualtif (16 avril) choix des thèmes pour le papier

8- Clivage thématique 1(23 avril)  : La dynamique générationnelle de Mannheim à Ryder et Inglehart.

9- Clivage thématique 2 (7 mai) : Générations représentations et religion Ryder, Inglehart, Norris

10- Clivage thématique 3 (14 mai) : Le clivage territorial

11- Clivage thématique 4 (21 mai) :   Ethnicité et immigration

12- Présentation des mémoires 1 (28 mai)

13- Présentation des mémoires 2 (4 juin)

14- Synthèse des travaux et conclusion (11 juin)

slide3

Socialization versus individual and collective history

      • Life cycle and socialization
      • Primary and secondary socialization
      • The « transitionnal socialization »
      • Long term impact of the « transitionnal socialization » : « scar effect »
      • History and the constitution of a Generationengeist and of a Generationenlage

16-18 y.o.

  • 25-30 y.o.
slide4

Méthodes (1) : Le diagramme de Lexis (1872)

Période, âge et cohorte de naissance comme trois temps colinéaires : est-il possible de les séparer ?

Ligne de vie

:

Age

Isochrone: observation

Cohorte née e

n

en 1968

1918

1948

80

1978

60

40

Age à l’année

20

d’observation

:

20 ans

0

Période

1890

1910

1930

1950

1970

1990

2010

slide5

Gosta Esping-Andersen (Danish, born in 1947) Professor at Universitat Pompeu Fabra (Barcelona - Spain)

slide6

Interpreting the French case:

      • Esping-Andersen Typology of Welfare states: France = “corporatist-conservative” welfare regime, stabilization of social relationsProtection of insiders (protected male workers) against outsiders
      • In case of economic brake : « Insiderisation » of insiders, already in the stable labor force and « outsiderisation » of new entrants
      • In France, young people can wait … decades Increasing poverty rates for young people, stable intracohort inequalities (after taxes and welfare reallocations)
      • Are other intergenerational compromise possible ?
slide7

« Social-democrat » Model (Nordic Europe) : FINLAND Citizenship and participation to social bargaining of all social groups (gender, generations, etc.). Responsibility for a long-term development HD0 : less (but slightly increasing) intracohort inequalities HD1 : residual intercohort inequalities (positive compromise between generations)

  • Conservative model (Continental Europe) : FRANCE Preservation of (old) social equilibriums, with social insurance excluding unemployed => strong intercohort inequalities but less intracohort inequalities than in the Liberal model (but younger cohorts face stronger intracohort inequ.)
  • <Familialistic Model (Mediterranean Europe) : ITALY><Conservative + family and local solidarities>
  • Liberal model : (Anglo-saxon world) : UK Market as a central institution, residual welfare state against market failures HL0 : more intracohort inequalities HL1 : less intercohort inequality (competition between generations)

II. A four (3 <+1>) models comparison: a welfare regime theory (GEA)

slide8

III.Results: inter- intra- cohort responses of welfare regimes

  • DATA : Luxembourg Income Surveys LIS DATA: Finland, France, Italy and the United-Kingdom
  • 4 PERIODS : 1: about 1985; 2: about 1990 ; 3: about 1995 ; 4: about 2000
  • 2 MEASURES : A- Medians of relative adjusted disposable income (RADI), by age group; Radi = 1 relates to the 30 to 64 year old average of the periodB- Interdecile Ratios of RADI, by age group POPULATION : Individuals RADI pertaining to their own householdQuestion 1 : are the young age groups having declining RADI ? Question 2 : which age groups face more or less inequality of RADI ?
slide9

Dynamics of intercohort inequalities age median (1=nat. median income)Source : Lisproject data own calculations – standardized disposable family income

FI

FR

age

age

IT

UK

age

age

slide10

Dynamics of intercohort inequalities age median (1=nat. median income)Source : Lisproject data own calculations – standardized disposable family income

FI

FR

Stable

Decline for the young

age

age

IT

UK

Almost stable

age

Decline for the young

age

slide11

Dynamics of intracohort inequalities (interdec ratio D9/D1)

Source : Lisproject data own calculations

FI

FR

age

age

IT

UK

age

age

slide12

Dynamics of intracohort inequalities (interdec ratio D9/D1)

Source : Lisproject data own calculations

FI

FR

Increase of ineq for all

age

Decline of ineq for elders

age

IT

UK

Youngers more inequal elders more equal

Increase of ineq for all(with fluctuations)

age

age

slide13

Main results :

1- More intercohort inequality in France and Italy (blurred in Italy by the collapse of fertility rates), but unclear intracohort inequality changes

2- More intracohort inequality in UK, (also in FI but more controlled)

TRADE OFF ??? => more intra or more inter cohort inequality ?

In France and Italy, seniors are better and junior more often in difficulties => strong risk of social déclassement for younger cohorts

  • Open Questions :

Familialistic solidarities stronger in countries where the young are in difficulty?

Family help is an answer or an indirect cause ?

Dangers of family help? Chicken and/or egg?

slide14

Conclusion : Europe and the world

      • Three great models of evolution :
        • Continental and Mediterranean Europe (+ Japon) : protection of insiders against outsiders (new generations are facing major difficulties)
        • UK, US and anglo-saxon countries : the new generations, in the average, face difficulties, but higher inequalities imply a divergence between lowest and highest income groups and social classes
        • Northern Europe : Closer to a universalistic egalitarian equilibrium between age groups, genders and social classes (lower intra- and inter- cohort inequalities)
      • Emerging countries :
        • in fast growth countries (China, Taiwan ?, India, Central-Easter Europe) : new opportunities for newer cohorts, and higher inter- and intra-cohort inequalities to the benefit to young university graduates
        • in stagnation countries (Argentina, Northern Africa) : intergenerational inequalities and generational destabilization (inflation of diplomas and declining return to education)
slide15

A French/European version of the debate :

Yamada Masahiro 山田昌弘 (東京学芸大学 教授)Genda Yuji 玄田有史 (東京大学社会科学研究所教授 )

NEET (Not in Employment, Education or Trainingニート) parasite single (パラサイトシングル parasaito shinguru)Freeter (フリーターfurita)

(引き篭り Hikikomori)

  • This intervention :
  • 1- The problem of generations in France: empirical facts
  • 2- Diversities of Welfare regimes
  • 3- The general linkage between welfare regime and generational dynamics
slide17

Une lecture alternative du lien générations/socialisation :Le modèle de Inglehart

(et les bases de ce qu’il faut en savoir…)

slide18
Ronald Inglehart : Pr de sociologie politique comparative et quantitative de Michigan University (Ann Harbor) = World values survey
  • Inglehart R., 1990, Culture shift in advanced industrial society, Princetion University Press, Princetion (NJ).
  • Inglehart R. et W.E. Baker, 2000, « Modernization, cultural change and the persistance of traditional values », American sociological review, vol. 65, pp. 19-51.(La réponse )
  • (Max Haller : Pr de sociologie comparative et méthodologie à l’Université de Graz, Autriche = International social survey program)
  • (Haller M., 2002, « Theory and method in the comparative study of values: critique and alternative to Inglehart », European sociological review, vol. 18, n.2, pp. 139-158.)
slide19

Inglehart et le « postmatérialisme » (et la postmodernité en contrepoint)Le modèle de Maslow (1943) : des besoins hiérarchisés …

Inglehart 1990

slide20

Inglehart 1990

  • Indicateur :*maintenir l’ordre*avoir plus son mot à dire (More say in gov)*lutter contre la hausse des prix*protéger la liberté d’expression
slide21

Problème empirique :

  • Lien avec le PIB pas systématique
  • Croissance de l’indicateur faible dans le temps
  • Intervention d’un paramètre générationnel (birth cohorts)
  • Quel contexte économique dans la période de formation ?
  • Effet de retard sur les valeurs => il faut attendre la disparition des anciennes générations pour que les anciennes valeurs disparaissent….

Inglehart 1990

slide22

Inglehart 1990

  • Une lecture générationnelle des évolutions (Inglehart)

Inglehart, Ronald, and Paul R. Abramson, “Economic Security and Value Change.”, APSR, 1994. Vol. 88: 336-353.

slide23

Inglehart 1990

  • Critiques généralement formulées
  • Est-ce bien aussi graduel, cette hiérarchie des besoins ?Confusion entre un progrès type 1968 et besoin supérieur…(en France, et en Chine, manger est un besoin esthétique supérieur…)
  • L’inflation, dans son indicateur, ce n’est pas très sérieux… « Postmatérialisme » ou peur de la hausse des prix ?L’alternative entre ordre et droit à la parole… Ce n’est pas très clair
  • Dans son discours, Inglehart confond deux choses :(A) Sécularisation (ce que les français appellent « Laïcité »), et rapport à la divinité(B) Valeurs d’ « ouverture culturelle » => « postmatérialisme »
slide24

Inglehart 1990

  • Néanmoins, ce qui est robuste :
  • Les générations qui ont rencontré l’abondance sont beaucoup plus « ouvertes » en termes de valeurs
  • Les nouvelles générations mettent en évidence sinon un retournement, en tous cas une stagnation de l’indicateur
  • Ce n’est pas toujours convaincant, mais c’est assez utile pour comprendre de grands changements de valeurs
  • Faut-il juger un modèle selon ses qualités théoriques, ou selon ses résultats ??? (réponse : les deux)
ad