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Week 6 Journal 23. Pick up a journal sheet. You were handed a worksheet as you entered the room today. These are slang terms from the 1920s. Select 6 terms from the list and write them in your journal. Give a prediction for the meaning of those 6 terms.

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week 6 journal 23

Week 6 Journal 23

Pick up a journal sheet.

You were handed a worksheet as you entered the room today.

These are slang terms from the 1920s.

Select 6 terms from the list and write them in your journal. Give a prediction for the meaning of those 6 terms.

Ex – Jalopy – an old run down car

NO ! You may not use jalopy!

week 6 journal 231

Week 6 Journal 23

Pick up a journal sheet.

You were handed a worksheet as you entered the room today.

These are slang terms from the 1920s.

Select 6 terms from the list and write them in your journal. Give a prediction for the meaning of those 6 terms.

Ex – Jalopy – an old run down car

NO ! You may not use jalopy!

slide4

Banana Oil

    • nonsense
  • Dumb Dora
    • Absolute idiot, a dumbbell – usually a women
  • Hooey
    • nonsense
  • Ritzy
    • elegant
chapter 12

CHAPTER 12

POLITICS OF THE THE ROARING 20s

three important terms
THREE IMPORTANT TERMS
  • Nativism –
    • Belief that. . .
  • Isolationism
    • Staying off. . .
  • Communism –
    • Political system based on a single-party government
    • Ruled by a dictatorship
    • Usually accompanied by a socialist economy
resulted in
RESULTED IN
  • Nativism
    • Anti-immigrant feelings / actions
    • Immigration laws
    • Violence
  • Isolationism
    • Limited foreign involvement
  • Communism
    • End private property
    • Government owned factories and businesses
slide8

Bee’s Knees

    • A superb person or thinbg
  • Fall Guy
    • Someone who takes the blame for the wrong doings of others
  • Hotsy-totsy
    • Pleasing
  • Scratch
    • money
fear of communism red scare
FEAR OF COMMUNISMRED SCARE
  • An increase in strikes caused concern about the spread of communism
  • Believed communist would take control of the government
slide10
70,000 Americans joined the communist party
  • Communist wanted to
    • Overthrow capitalist system
    • Abolish free enterprise
    • Abolish private property
a little background information
A little background information
  • April 1919 - postal service intercepted more than 30 packages with bombs
  • Targeted leading business men
  • June 1919
  • 8 bombs in 8 cities went off within minutes of each other
  • Could be a nation wide conspiracy
palmer raids
PALMER RAIDS
  • One of bombs damaged home of US Atty. Gen. Mitchell Palmer
  • Took action against the Red Scare
  • Appointed J. Edgar Hoover as head of Anti-radical Division of the Justice Department
    • FBI
slide13
Palmer sent agents to hunt down communists, anarchists, socialists
  • Agents showed no regard for civil rights
  • Deported many without trial
  • Raids never turned up anything
  • Claimed something big would happen on May 1, 1920
  • It did not and people stopped listening to him
slide15

Belly laugh

    • A loud, uninhibited laugh
  • Fire extinguisher
    • A chaperone
  • Jake
    • Okay – “everything is jake”
  • Sheba
    • A very attractive young woman
sacco and vanzetti
SACCO AND VANZETTI
  • Italian immigrants
  • Anarchists
  • April 15, 1920
  • 2 men from the shoe company were killed and the payroll was stolen - $15,000
slide17
Sacco and Vanzetti had alibis but were convicted anyway
  • Made several appeals
  • August 23, 1927 they were executed.
question
QUESTION

Why did Attorney General Palmer launch a series of raids against suspected Communists?

What were the results of the raids?

slide19

Blind Date

    • A date with someone you have never met
  • Flat Tire
    • A dull, boring person
  • Jalopy
    • An old car
  • Sheik
    • A very attractive young man
limiting immigration
LIMITING IMMIGRATION
  • Immigrants were viewed as radicals
  • Big businesses did not like immigrants anymore
  • Labor unions and strikes
    • They want limits now
return of the ku klux klan
RETURN OF THE KU KLUX KLAN
  • Helped to lead the movement to limit immigration
  • Now they also target Catholics, Jewish people, immigrants and other groups seen as representing “un-American” values
slide22
Klan advertised that they were fighting for “Americanism”
  • Influenced politics until the late 1920s
emergency quota act
EMERGENCY QUOTA ACT
  • Established a temporary quota system limiting immigration
  • 3% of ethnic group’s population in US in 1910
  • Greatly affected S and E European immigrants
the national origins act of 1924
THE NATIONAL ORIGINS ACT OF 1924
  • Made the Quota Act Permanent
  • Made it tighter –
    • 2%
    • 1890 census
    • Favored N and W immigrants
question1
QUESTION

Why did Congress make changes in immigration laws during the 1920s?

slide27

Big cheese

    • An important person
  • Frame
    • To cause a person’s arrest by providing false evidence
  • Keen
    • Attractive, appealing
  • Smeller
    • nose
labor unrest
LABOR UNREST
  • During the war Wilson did not allow strikes
  • When the war was over many workers went on strike
  • 1919 – 3,600 strikes involving four million workers
boston police strike
BOSTON POLICE STRIKE
  • 75% of police walked off the job
  • Riots and looting started
  • Mass. Governor CALVIN COOLIDGE called in National Guard
  • Police commissioner fired strikers and hired new officers
the steel mill strike
THE STEEL MILL STRIKE
  • 350,000 workers walked off job
  • Elbert Gary – head of US Steel – would not talk to union
  • Used anti immigrant feelings to split workers
  • Hired African Americans and Mexicans to keep steel mills open
  • Strike collapsed
coal miners strike
COAL MINERS STRIKE
  • 1919 – United Mine Workers of America organized a strike
  • John L Lewis – leader
  • They wanted . . Raise – less hours – shorter week
  • Pres. Wilson gets involved – orders end
  • Lewis agrees – then orders –
  • Outcome -
seattle general strike
SEATTLE GENERAL STRIKE
  • Wanted higher wages and shorter hours
  • Walked off job
  • Grew into a GENERAL STRIKE
  • Did not get demands
  • Caused fear among American people
  • This was a tactic used by European Communist Workers
results of strikes
RESULTS OF STRIKES
  • Limited gains
  • Decline of union membership
    • Immigrants were willing to work in poor conditions
    • Difficult to organize people speaking so many different languages
    • Farmers now working in factories were self reliant
    • African Americans were excluded
  • Views of unions were changing
slide34

Bull session

    • Informal group discussion
  • Gam
    • A girl’s leg
  • I have to go see a man about a dog.
    • An excuse to leave when you do not want others to know what you are doing.
  • Speakeasy
    • A saloon or bar selling bootleg whiskey
section 2

SECTION 2

THE HARDING PRESIDENCY

isolationism arms control
ISOLATIONISM – ARMS CONTROL
  • The US became isolationists after World War I
  • We wanted to stay out of foreign affairs
charles evans hughes secretary of state
Charles Evans Hughes- Secretary of State

MORATORIUM

  • A pause on the construction of major new warships
five four nine power treaties
FIVE, FOUR, NINE POWER TREATIES
  • Treaties between the US and other countries to
    • Limit military ships
    • Recognize island possessions and China’s independence
kellog briand pact
KELLOG-Briand pact
  • All countries that signed it agreed to abandon war and settle disputes peacefully
farm crisis
FARM CRISIS
  • Same old thing - - -
    • Better equipment
    • Produce more
    • Prices go down
    • Cost of equipment is high
    • Farmers go bankrupt!!!!!
market conditions
MARKET CONDITIONS
  • High production
  • Increased supply
  • Lower costs

What is the effect on businesses?

  • GOVERNMENT RESPONSE
  • Fordney-McCumber Tariff
    • Raised tariffs to highest yet
    • – caused less foreign trade
the dawes plan
THE DAWES PLAN
  • Conflict about WW I reparation payments between Britain, France and Germany. . . .
  • US Banker Dawes was sent to negotiate loan terms between countries
  • Resulted in. . .
harding and the ohio gang
HARDING AND THE OHIO GANG

GOOD

  • Herbert Hoover
    • Secretary of Commerce
  • Andrew Mellon
    • Secretary of Treasury
  • Charles “Doc” Sawyer
    • White House Doctor
  • Albert Fall
    • Secretary of the Interior
  • Charles Forbes
    • Head of Veterans’ Bureau
  • Daniel Crissinger
    • Chairman of the Federal Reserve Board

BAD

mellon s policies results
MELLON’S POLICIES & RESULTS
  • Goals
    • Balance the budget
    • Reduce government debt
    • Cut taxes
  • Believed these would promote economic growth and ensure prosperity
  • In 7 years the government cut the budget from 6.4 billion to 3 billion
week 5 journal 19
Week 5 JOURNAL 19
  • Read the pink booklet on your desk and then answer the following questions. Paraphrase the questions in your answers.
  • What resulted from the assembly line and automobile production?
  • Where was jazz music first played?
  • What did Charles Lindbergh do?
  • What is a flapper?
  • What three issues divided America in the 1920s?
  • What is the Harlem Renaissance?
hoover s cooperative individualism
HOOVER’S COOPERATIVE INDIVIDUALISM
  • Encouraged manufacturers and distributors to form trade associations and they would share information with the federal government.
teapot dome scandal
TEAPOT DOME SCANDAL
  • Albert Fall
  • Lease
  • Kickbacks
  • First cabinet member to go to jail!
question2
QUESTION

How did the scandals of the Harding Administration hurt the country economically?

slide50

Bump off

    • To murder
  • Gate Crasher
    • A person who attends a party without an invitation
  • Kisser
    • mouth
  • Spiffy
    • Having an elegant, fashionable appearance
section 3

SECTION 3

THE BUSINESS OF AMERICA

august 2 1923
AUGUST 2, 1923
  • Harding dies
  • Coolidge
coolidge
COOLIDGE
  • Very different from Harding
  • Cleaned up cabinet
  • Belief
    • Most problems would fix themselves if you would just be still.
    • Big business was good for the economy
      • Should be allowed to operate with little government regulation
industries
INDUSTRIES
  • Wages are increasing
  • Work week decreasing
  • Paid vacations!

MASS PRODUCTION

  • Large scale product manufacturing
    • Usually by machines
  • Created more supply and reduced consumer costs *****
automobile
AUTOMOBILE
  • Tin Lizzy
    • Impact of the assembly line on the car industry
      • $850.00 to $295.00
      • 12 hours to 93 minutes
      • Ford increased sales by decreasing costs
  • Impact of the automobile
    • Commute to work – led to URBAN SPRAWL
    • Rural areas are not so isolated
slide56

Cash

    • A kiss
  • Giggle water
    • Alcoholic drink
  • Line
    • Insincere flattery
  • Spifflicated
    • drunk
airline
AIRLINE
  • 1903 – first flight
    • Wright Brothers
  • 1918 – mail
  • 1927 – passenger
  • 1927 – CHARLES LINDBERGH
    • First flight across the Atlantic
      • Spirit of St. Louis
  • 1937 – AMELIA EARHART
    • Tried to fly around the world
    • Disappeared after 2/3 of the trip
standard of living soars
Standard of Living Soars
  • Consumer products of the 1920s focused on convenience
    • Electric razor
    • Toaster
    • Radio
    • Frozen food
    • Cleansers
    • Gas stove
    • New fashions
    • Mouthwash
advertising
ADVERTISING
  • Focused on the ideas of the 20s
    • Convenience
    • Leisure
    • success
superficial prosperity
SUPERFICIAL PROSPERITY
  • Businesses were expanding –
    • Chain stores
    • Banks were opening up multiple branches in cities
  • Production was soaring
  • New position of the 20s – manager
    • Growing gap between managers and workers
  • Businesses aren’t so prosperous now!
slide61

Cat’s Meow

    • Anything wonderful
  • Gold digger
    • Woman who uses their charm to extract money from a man
  • Lounge lizard
    • Ladies man
  • Stuck on
    • Having a crush on
welfare capitalism
WELFARE CAPITALISM
  • Allowed workers to
    • buy stock
    • Participate in profit sharing
    • Receive benefits
  • Made unions seem unnecessary
consumer society
CONSUMER SOCIETY
  • CREDIT
    • Buy now, pay later
    • Installment plan
    • Allowed consumers to buy faster than their salary increased
question3
QUESTION

What were the main advantage / disadvantage of buying on credit?

chapter 13
CHAPTER 13
  • THE ROARING LIFE OF THE 1920S
  • SECTION 1
  • CHANGING WAYS OF LIFE
week 5 journal 20
Week 5 JOURNAL 20

Read the quote and answer the questions that follow:

“The air would be heavy with tobacco smoke, trays with bottles containing every imaginable brand of whiskey . . . Cards and poker chips at hand – a general atmosphere of waistcoat unbuttoned, feet on desk, and spittoons alongside.”

  • What is the description referring to?
  • Explain what it is.
prohibition
PROHIBITION
  • Many believed prohibiting alcohol would solve society’s problems
  • Illegal to buy, make, consume
  • Volstead Act was passed to help enforce prohibition
  • Treasury Department was responsible for enforcing prohibition
slide69
Speakeasies
  • NY City had 32,000 bars
  • Bootlegging
  • Organized Crime
    • Al Capone
      • Arrested
      • Convicted for tax evasion
slide70

Cheaters

    • Eye glasses
  • Goofy
    • silly
  • Neck
    • To caress intimately
  • Swanky
    • Elegant, good
science and religion clash
SCIENCE AND RELIGION CLASH
  • American Fundamentalism
    • Creationism
  • Evolution
the scopes trial
THE SCOPES TRIAL
  • Butler Act passed in 1925 - TN
  • Outlawed teaching evolution
  • ACLU advertised for someone willing to test the law
  • Scopes from Dayton, TN
  • Arrested for teaching evolution in Biology
slide74
William Jennings Bryan is the prosecutor
  • Clarence Darrow is the defense attorney
  • Scopes was found guilty
  • $100.00 fine
  • Overturned on a technicality
question4
QUESTION
  • What was the conflict between Fundamentalists and those who accepted evolution?
slide77

Dead soldier

    • An empty beer bottle
  • Hard-boiled
    • Tough – without sentiment
  • Ossified
    • drunk
  • Swell
    • marvelous
section 21

SECTION 2

THE TWENTIES WOMAN

changing rules the new morality
CHANGING RULESTHE NEW MORALITY
  • Glorified youth and personal freedoms
  • Friendships in marriages
  • Women held jobs to get out of parental responsibilities
women in the 1920s
WOMEN IN THE 1920s
  • Fashions changed
  • Bobbed haircuts, lipstick, blush
  • Flesh colored stockings, shorter skirts
  • FLAPPER – young women of the 1920s
    • Revealing clothing
    • Drank prohibited alcohol
    • smoked
slide82
Double Standards
  • Work opportunities
    • Some women wanted financial independence
    • Sales clerks, operators, secretaries
    • Some contributed to science, medicine, law and literature
  • Changing Family
    • Less housework,
    • Spend more time doing pastime activities
    • greater equality in marriage,
    • children not in factories
    • Some children tended to me more rebellious
question5
QUESTION
  • How did the growth of business and industry affect women?
slide84

Main drag

    • The most important street in town
  • Scram
    • To leave hurriedly
  • Pet
    • To caress intimately
  • Tight
    • attractive
section 31

SECTION 3

EDUCATION AND POP CULTURE

school enrollment
SCHOOL ENROLLMENT
  • More children are in school because of . . .
    • Compulsory school attendance laws
    • Education is viewed as a key to success
    • More schools
mass media
Mass Media
  • Communication with large numbers of people through one source
  • Newspapers and magazines
    • education
  • Radio
    • Limited
    • Entertainment
    • NBC and CBS
slide88

Dogs

    • Your feet
  • Heebie-jeebies
    • The jitters,
  • Pinch
    • To arrest
  • Torpedo
    • A hired gun man
new heroes and old dreams
NEW HEROES AND OLD DREAMS
  • Life became fun again
    • New pastimes
  • Lindbergh
    • Spirit of St. Louis
  • SPORTS
    • Gertude Ederle
    • Babe Ruth
    • Jack Dempsey
    • Helen Wills
arts and entertainment
Arts and Entertainment
  • BOHEMIAN LIFESTYLE
    • Very free
    • Expressed themselves through art and literature
  • T.S. Elliott
  • F. Scott Fitzgerald
  • Earnest Hemingway
hollywood
HOLLYWOOD
  • Charlie Chaplin
    • Famous silent movie star
  • The Jazz Singer
    • 1927
    • First talking movie
  • Disney – Steamboat Willie - 1928
slide92
Music
    • George Gershwin
  • Art
    • Georgia O’Keefe
  • Writers
    • F. Scott Fitzgerald
    • Edna St. Vincent Millay
    • Ernest Hemingway
question6
QUESTION
  • Why did radio become so popular?
slide94

Dope

    • drugs- esp. cocaine and opium
  • Hep
    • wise
  • Pushover
    • A person or thing easily overcome
  • Upchuck
    • vomit
section 4

SECTION 4

THE HARLEM RENAISSANCE

the great migration
THE GREAT MIGRATION
  • African Americans moved from the South to the North to escape discrimination and get a better life
  • Found out things were much the same in the North
racial unrest
RACIAL UNREST
  • American soldiers returned home from war needing a job
  • Jobs were filled with African Americans
  • Much violence
  • Summer 1919 – 20 race riots
  • Worst in Chicago – days
  • 38 killed – 15 white – 23 black

500

injured

naacp
NAACP
  • National Association for the Advancement of Colored People
  • WEB DuBois – 1909
  • James Weldon Johnson
  • Worked for . . .
slide100

POLITICS

  • Returned from war wanting to make a change – began to vote in large numbers
  • Oscar DePrist - 1st African American Representative in congress from a northern state
marcus garvey
MARCUS GARVEY
  • From Jamaica
  • Believed African Americans would never achieve equality or liberty in the United States
  • Helped to organize the American Colonization Society a group that helped African Americans move to Africa
    • Liberia
  • Also founded
    • Universal Negro Improvement Association
      • Promoted African American businesses
  • He served time for mail fraud
slide102

Drugstore Cowboy

    • A nice dressed idler who hangs out in public places
  • Hooch
    • Bootleg liquor
  • Real McCoy
    • A genuine item
  • Whoopee
    • Boisterous, uninhibited fun
harlem reniassance
HARLEM RENIASSANCE
  • African Americans expressed their pride in their culture through art and literature.
paul robeson
Paul Robeson

Performer

bessie smith
Bessie Smith

Musician

slide113

R

O

A

R

I

N

G

T

W

E

N

T

I

E

S

week 6 journal 21
Week 6 Journal 21
  • What is Prohibition?
  • What groups supported prohibition?
  • What amendment established it?
  • What Act did Congress pass to help enforce Prohibition?
  • Name two effects of Prohibition.
week 6 journal 22
Week 6 Journal 22
  • Write a sentence using as many of the 1920s slang terms correctly as you can.
  • Get a set of flashcards and study with someone close to you.
  • Do not move desks.
writers
WRITERS
  • Langston Hughes
  • Countee Cullen

JAZZ, BLUES, THEATER

  • Louis Armstrong
  • Duke Ellington

POLITICS

  • Returned from war wanting to make a change – began to vote in large numbers
  • Oscar DePrist - 1st African American Representative in congress from a northern state