dependent clauses n.
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Dependent Clauses. There are 3 different types of dependent clauses. Noun Clause (NC) Adjective Clause (AdjC) Adverb Clause (AdvC). Noun Clause ( NC ). [S+V/] that acts like a noun Example: I think [you are sick]. I think [ you are sick ]. V. S. O.

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dependent clauses
Dependent Clauses
  • There are 3 different types of dependent clauses.
    • Noun Clause (NC)
    • Adjective Clause (AdjC)
    • Adverb Clause (AdvC)
noun clause nc
Noun Clause (NC)
  • [S+V/] that acts like a noun
      • Example: I think [you are sick].

Ithink[you are sick].

V

S

O

Objects are nouns; this entire clause acts like a singular noun, so it is a noun clause.

  • NCs usually follow verbs as objects or complements
      • “Answers” the question “What?”
      • Example:
        • Q: What do you think?
        • A: I think Spiderman is the best superhero.
noun clause nc continued
Noun Clause (NC) -- continued
  • NCs can begin with “that”
    • “that” is a subordinating conjunction that
        • joins it to an IC
        • makes the clause it begins depend on the IC to complete its meaning.
  • “that” is often omitted by native speakers:
    • Example:

I think Spiderman is the best superhero.

I think that Spiderman is the best superhero.

adjective clause adjc
Adjective Clause (AdjC)
  • [S+V/] that acts like an adjective
    • Example: The story [that I am reading] is sad.

[thatIam reading]

S

V

relative pronoun

This entire clause acts like an adjective, so it is an adjective clause.

  • AdjCs follow nouns
  • Often start with relative pronouns
      • but the relative pronoun can be omitted
        • if the clause has another noun to serve as the subject
        • EX: The story [Iam reading]is sad.
adverb clause advc
Adverb Clause (AdvC)
  • [S+V/] that acts like an adverb
    • Example: [After we drove to the mall] , we looked for a bookstore.

This clause gives information about how or why the action happened, so it acts like an adverb.

  • AdvCs always begin with a subordinating conjunction
      • after although as because before even though if since unless until when