Little fixin big idea
Download
1 / 7

- PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 64 Views
  • Uploaded on

Little Fixin ’, Big Idea. Inference and Argument. Imply v. Infer. To imply is to suggest or hint. To infer is to conclude or deduce. IN. LIE. Great, so I have an inference. Now what do I do with it?. An inference becomes an argument!. An argument is a claim supported by evidence!.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about '' - baris


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
Little fixin big idea

Little Fixin’, Big Idea

Inference and Argument


Imply v infer
Imply v. Infer

To imply is to suggest or hint

To infer is to conclude or deduce

IN

LIE



An argument is a claim supported by evidence
An argument is a claim supported by evidence!

  • How do I know if I’m making a claim?

    • Someone can disagree with you!

  • The topic sentence of a good paragraph is a claim

  • The analysis of quotes provides evidence

Not JUST a series of contradictions

You need evidence!


Rules for in text citation
Rules for In-Text Citation

  • THESE WILL VARY BASED ON THE MEDIUM (Shakes =/= Lee)

  • (Author #).

  • Literature stays in the present tense

  • Quotes are like weird cousins – you’re better off introducing and explaining them


Remember you can quote a book without quoting a character
REMEMBER!! You can quote a book without quoting a character.

  • The mystery of Boo Radley’s home evoked an anxious curiosity of Maycomb’s children. Even after touching the house, Jem “ran back past [Scout and Dill], not waiting to see if his foray was successful” (Lee 15). Jem’s decision to touch the Radley house is laden with fear.