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FEMA EMI Higher Education Conference 2010. Collaborative Learning and Utilizing Disaster Simulations for and Online Bachelor’s Degree Program in Emergency Management.

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fema emi higher education conference 2010

FEMA EMIHigher Education Conference 2010

Collaborative Learning and Utilizing Disaster Simulations for and Online Bachelor’s Degree Program in Emergency Management

slide2

Dr. Michael J. O’Connor Jr.Associate Professor of Emergency ManagementState University of New YorkCanton College of TechnologyandPart-time FacultyPublic Service DepartmentCapella University

state university of new york canton college of technology
State University of New YorkCanton College of Technology
  • Located in Canton, New York (North of

the Adirondacks and South of the

St. Lawrence River)

  • SUNY Canton has recently established bachelor’s degrees in engineering, business, info technology, etc.
  • Canton has regional and global partners, with agreements at institutions in Massachusetts, Ontario, Wyoming, Russia, Bosnia … just to name a few
emergency management
Emergency Management
  • Bachelor’s of Technology Program in EADM founded Fall 2006
  • First (and still only) faculty member hired August 2006
  • First courses offered October 2006 to four EADM majors, CJ majors and the general college population
  • 50+ majors (current students and those already having paid deposits) already enrolled for Fall 2009
program organization
Program Organization

201 Fundaments

205 Risk and Hazard Impacts Studies

220 Disaster Management

222 Community Preparedness

307 Legal Issues

400 Incident Command

430 Virtual Exercises

435 Disaster Simulation

480 Internships

485 Senior Projects

course organization
Course Organization
  • Orientation
  • Syllabus
  • Instructor Biography
  • Course Documents (MS Word, Excel, Powerpoints, Websites, Projects and Exercises)
  • Examinations, Surveys (Assessments)
  • Writing Assignments
  • Announcements
  • Discussion Boards
unique aspects
Unique Aspects
  • Program is offered online in a 7-week format
  • Classroom-based coursework may be implemented Fall 2011 (or never)
  • Courses originally offered via Blackboard now offered via Angel (Fall 2008)
  • All online courses must receive approval from a faculty committee prior to being offered (online course review process)
  • All courses are also offered via the SUNY Learning Network (SLN)
online course review
Online Course Review
  • All online courses are reviewed prior to their initial offering and are reexamined on a three-year cycle
  • Course reviewers utilize a rubric developed by Maryland Online which was sponsored by FIPSE (U.S. Department of Education - Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education)
  • Based on the Middle States Commission on Higher Education’s standards of best practices in distance learning programs
course review rubric criteria
Course Review Rubric Criteria
  • Materials are accessible and appropriate
  • Objectives and learning outcomes are consistent with one another
  • Course navigation is logical and unambiguous
  • Assessment is built into the course
  • Interaction with learners is provided and support is available
four questions typically asked about online learning
Four Questions Typically Asked about Online Learning

Can we teach everyone via online learning?

Can we teach all subjects via online learning?

What methods and technologies are available to teach emergency management in the online classroom?

Can we improve teaching in the online classroom?

predictors of success in an online course
Predictors of Success in an Online Course
  • For online courses:
    • Learners should be directed to be self-regulated learners . . .
    • Orientation about the nature of online learning . . . should be provided to students
    • Learners should be encouraged to keep their motivation at a high level through the help of instructional activities
predictor s continued
Predictor’s, continued
    • Learners’ performance should be monitored, and individual and timely feedback should be provided
    • Interaction through both synchronous and asynchronous communication tools should be encouraged
    • Course contents should be of immediate real-life value for the students
  • Yukselturk, E. & Bulut, S. (2007). Predictors for student success in an online course. Educational Technology & Society, 10(2), 71-83.
slide16

Can we teach everyone via online learning? Answer: Yes! (caveat: learners have a much better chance of success if they are (or can become) self-regulating

can we teach all subjects via online learning1
Can we teach all subjects via online learning?

For example, to teach:

Academic subjects which require (“lecture” type of courses):

- learning concepts and principles,

- engaging in discussions,

- writing papers, or

- solving problems – these usually work

well in an online format

Kearsley, G. (1999) Online Education: Learning and Teaching in Cyberspace. Wadsworth.

subjects continued
Subjects, continued

Those which require the teaching of:

- Motor skills – may require that

simulations be developed

- Science, Math and Engineering – may

require additional software tools

(Mathmatica, CAD, etc.)

- Numerous Visual Images – may require

the use of CD’s

Kearsley, G. (1999) Online Education: Learning and Teaching in Cyberspace. Wadsworth.

teaching online
Teaching (Online)
  • Undergraduate

- Lower Division: Most courses are

“lecture-type” courses

      • Use of “measured” course readings, discussion readings, lecture readings, references, and websites)
      • Exams and Quizzes (midterms, final, quizzes)
      • Writing Assignments (style, length, evaluation)
      • Number and Timing of Assignments
teaching continued
Teaching, continued

- Upper Division: Courses are a mix of

“lecture” and science or apprenticeship-

style of courses

  • Video Clips, Podcasts, etc.
  • Simulations and Exercises providing “real life” experiences, where results are monitored and feedback provided through both synchronous and asynchronous methods (phone, email, online classroom boards, Skype, etc.)
slide22

Can we teach all subjects via online learning?Answer: Yes! (caveat: good instructional design must be utilized by faculty trained in course development techniques)

what methods and technologies are available to teach emergency management in the online classroom
What methods and technologies are available to teach emergency management in the online classroom?
what methods and technologies are available to teach emergency management in the online classroom1
What methods and technologies are available to teach emergency management in the online classroom?

Internships or Senior Projects

Live Exercises and Fieldtrips

Online Disaster Simulations

Other: American Red Cross, Conferences, Workshops, Emergency Management Club

internships or senior projects
Internships or Senior Projects

Students are doing senior projects or internship with the New York State Emergency Management Office, Rhode Island State Emergency Management Agency, DHS/U.S. Coast Guard, Fort Drum Emergency Management Officer and other local and state agencies (including Public Health

Student and mentor complete daily journals and weekly reports

other
Other!

American Red Cross (Disaster Services, Response Teams, etc.)

Conferences (Community Emergency Response, SEMO, Emergency Managers Conference)

Workshops and Meetings (LEPC, AMSC, etc.)

Emergency Management Club

live exercises
“Live” Exercises

Selected students are invited to observe and participate in developing, coordinating and evaluating exercises with local, state and Federal agencies.

Students have assisted with the development of DHS/U.S. Coast Guard full-scale exercises and Customs and Border Patrol Tabletop Exercises as well as other fieldtrips!

online disaster simulations
Online Disaster Simulations

Program offers 9 semester hours of virtual exercise or disaster simulations

One 3 semester hour course focuses on developing, conducting and evaluating exercises (typically TTX’s)

Another 6 semester hour course is “hands-on” and allows the students to actually develop an exercise – working in a “sim-cell”, as mock journalists, as part of the incident command staff or as an evaluator

types of simulations
Types of Simulations
  • Incident Commander
  • WecEOC “Central City” Simulations
  • Hurrevac
  • Hazus-MH (ESRI ArcView GIS)
  • Virtual Terrorism Response Academy
  • ICS 100/200 First Person Simulation
  • AEAS, CAMEO, ALOHA, etc.,
seven principles for good practice
Seven Principles for Good Practice

The "Seven Principles for Good Practice in Undergraduate Education," originally published in the AAHE Bulletin (Chickering & Gamson, 1987, 1993), are a popular framework for evaluating teaching.

Such a framework helps faculty members and higher-education institutions examine and improve their teaching practices.

principles 1 3
Principles 1-3
  • Principle 1: Good Practice Encourages Student-Faculty Contact
      • Lesson for online instruction: Instructors should provide clear guidelines for interaction with students.
  • Principle 2: Good Practice Encourages Cooperation Among Students
      • Lesson for online instruction: Well-designed discussion assignments facilitate meaningful cooperation among students.
  • Principle 3: Good Practice Encourages Active Learning
      • Lesson for online instruction: Students should present course projects.
principles 4 5
Principles 4-5
  • Principle 4: Good Practice Gives Prompt Feedback
      • Lesson for online instruction: Instructors need to provide two types of feedback: information feedback and acknowledgment feedback.
  • Principle 5: Good Practice Emphasizes Time on Task
      • Lesson for online instruction: Online courses need deadlines.
principles 6 7
Principles 6-7
  • Principle 6: Good Practice Communicates High Expectations
      • Lesson for online instruction: Challenging tasks, sample cases, and praise for quality work communicate high expectations.
  • Principle 7: Good Practice Respects Diverse Talents and Ways of Learning
      • Lesson for online instruction: Allowing students to choose project topics incorporates diverse views into online courses.
principles applications
Principles - Applications

Student-Faculty Contact

Cooperation among students

Active learning

Feedback

Time on Task

High Expectations

Diverse Talents and Ways of Learning

five pillars for quality online education for asynchronous learning networks aln
Five Pillars for Quality Online Education for Asynchronous Learning Networks (ALN)

Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

The Sloan Consortium (Sloan-C) developed the Five Pillars in the mid-1990’s (focused on measuring and improving the learning effectiveness of Asynchronous Learning Networks.

Sloan-C has websites that contain research on effective practices in each pillar.

five pillars continued
Five Pillars, continued

Learning Effectiveness: Learners interact (with faculty and each other) and engage in reflective discussions and collaborative learning.

Student Satisfaction: Learners are most satisfied when they are engaged in courses where there is a high level of interaction with others and collaborative experiences, and where they receive significant feedback from faculty in a timely manner.

Source: (Lorenzo & Moore, 2002).

five pillars continued1
Five Pillars, continued

Faculty Satisfaction: Faculty are most satisfied the flexibility of the online environment and the enhanced interactions that an online environment provides.

Cost Effectiveness: Use of online courses has become almost mandatory due to competitive pressures.

Access: Learners are able to easily access programs and services.

Source: (Lorenzo & Moore, 2002).

five pillars applications
Five Pillars - Applications

Learning effectiveness

Student satisfaction

Faculty satisfaction

Cost effectiveness

Access