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microteach

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  1. Microteaching A method for revealing student experiences in the classroom Kent Andersen Birmingham-Southern College (English & Leadership) Barbara Lom Davidson College (Biology) Betsy Sandlin Sewanee: The University of the South (Spanish) www.slideserve.com/balom/microteach

  2. Raise Your Hand If…. http://www.nrcc.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/Raised-Hands-008.jpg

  3. The View from Their Seats? How can we understand student experiences? Sources: - course evaluations - colleague visits - past experiences as a student - microteaching http://www.nrcc.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/Raised-Hands-008.jpg

  4. Exercise A Identify one area of inquiry into your students’ experiences that is not fully addressed by class visits or course evaluations. Think about an area that will improve student learning.

  5. ACS Workshop Mission Statement emphasize teaching and learning as central to the academic profession provide an annual faculty development Workshop for ACS faculty members

  6. ACS Teaching & Learning Workshop 1 week - since 1992 30 faculty participants ~2 per campus all disciplines all ranks 11 staff all former participants average = 8 years Associated Colleges of the South (ACS): Birmingham-Southern Centenary Centre Davidson Furman Hendrix Millsaps Morehouse Rhodes Rollins Sewanee Southwestern Spellman Trinity Richmond Washington & Lee

  7. 90% of attendees recommend the Workshop to colleagues (n=206) Persellin & Goodrick (2010)

  8. Learning Outcomes • LO1 Build on existing strengthsin teaching & identify areas for growth • LO2 Increase awareness of learners’ experiences in • the classroom • LO3 Explore new teaching & learning strategies • LO4 Contribute to a collaborativecommunityof • teachers • LO5 Reflecton how classroom choices affect learners and learning

  9. LO1 – Strengths& Areas for Growth • At Workshop Conclusion: • 91% increased awareness of my teaching strengths1 • 95% helped me identify areas where I can grow as a teacher1 • >1 Year Post-Workshop: • 94% since the Workshop I have more confidence in my teaching3 1Workshop Evals 2012-14 2Persellin & Goodrick (2010) 3Andersen, Lom, Sandlin (2013 – in progress)

  10. LO2 – Awareness of Learners’ Experiences • At Workshop Conclusion: • 99% increased my awareness of learners’ experiences in class1 • >1 Year Post-Workshop: • 96% more aware of how my behaviors affect learners3 • 96% more aware of student experiences • in the classroom3 1Workshop Evals 2012-14 2Persellin & Goodrick (2010) 3Andersen, Lom, Sandlin (2013 – in progress)

  11. LO3 – New Strategies • At Workshop Conclusion: • 92% helped me explore new teaching & • learning strategies1 • >1 Year Post-Workshop: • 90% I have made an effort to use cooperative or collaborative learning activities3 • 90% I have tried a new teaching strategy learned at the Workshop2 • 87% Since the Workshop I have taken more risks with my teaching2 1Workshop Evals 2012-14 2Persellin & Goodrick (2010) 3Andersen, Lom, Sandlin (2013 – in progress)

  12. LO4 – Community of Teachers • At Workshop Conclusion: • 93% contribute to a community of teachers1 • >1 Year Post-Workshop: • 84% more likely to talk about teaching with others2 1Workshop Evals 2012-14 2Persellin & Goodrick (2010) 3Andersen, Lom, Sandlin (2013 – in progress)

  13. LO5 - Reflect on Classroom Choices • At Workshop Conclusion: • 91% allowed me to reflect on choices that affect learners and learning1 • >1 Year Post-Workshop: • 93% - since the Workshop I have more become more aware and thoughtful about my teaching2 • 99% - since the Workshop I am more reflective about the learning process3 1Workshop Evals 2012-14 2Persellin & Goodrick (2010) 3Andersen, Lom, Sandlin (2013 – in progress)

  14. Workshop Schedule

  15. Microteaching – Effectiveness • 91% of attendees agree that microteaching provided useful • insights for teaching1(n=85) • “It [microteaching] was truly worthwhile, providing feedback on teaching that you cannot find anywhere else.”2 1Workshop Evals 2012-14 2Grollman (2014)

  16. What is Microteaching? “a teaching situation which is scaled down in terms of time and numbers of students”1 “a scaled-down teaching situation that nevertheless is representative of one’s classroom performance”2 1Allen & Clark(1967) p. 75 2Nowick (1983) p. 160

  17. Microteaching – Key Elements • 1 - videotaped micro lessons • 2 - immediate feedback • Amboi(2005)

  18. Microteaching - Groups T Participants (6) 1 teacher (T) + 5 students (S) (rotate roles) Staff (2) 1 on point (P); 1 on camera (C) (rotate roles) P S S S S S Maximize diversity within groups: no institutional overlap no disciplinary overlap range of academic ranks M:F ratio C http://www.clipartbest.com/cliparts/9T4/eo7/9T4eo74Ec.png http://www.nrcc.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/Raised-Hands-008.jpg http://www.computerclipart.com/computer_clipart_images/paper_and_a_pen_0515-0909-2116-0233_SMU.jpg

  19. Microteaching – Session

  20. Microteaching – Two Examples

  21. Questions About Microteaching? http://businessnetworking.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/question-marks.jpg

  22. Guidelines for Effective Feedback GOAL = unprocessed feedback from student perspectives in the moment use “I” statements no advice no hypotheticals (“stay in the slice”) no judgment, interpretation, or analysis

  23. Microteaching – Environment workshop not conference create safe & supportive environment teacher talks first continuity  group trust & comfort developmental (not evaluative) materials belong to teacher good teachers who want to be better experienced staff + annual training

  24. Microteaching – Take Homes all teachers have unique strengths some details matter - others go unnoticed learning from teachers in other disciplines (CASEY) being a student is useful for reflecting on teaching

  25. The View from Their Seats “Over the years, I’ve read about new teaching methods and attended a few trainings. I have learned so much more about excellent teaching by sitting in the classroom, as a student…there’s something about putting myself back into the shoes as a student that gives me a better viewpoint about what works in the classroom and what doesn’t.” Manning (2014)

  26. Adapting Microteaching A - Identify one area of inquiry into your students’ experiences that is not fully addressed by class visits or course evaluations. B – How can the methodology of microteaching help you answer that question?

  27. Adapting Microteaching A - Identify one area of inquiry into your students’ experiences that is not fully addressed by class visits or course evaluations. B – How can the methodology of microteaching help you answer that question? C – How others plan to use elements of microteaching to answer their questions?

  28. Questions? Betsy Sandlin (Spanish) bsandlin@sewanee.edu Barbara Lom (Biology) balom@davidson.edu Kent Andersen (English & Leadership Studies) kanderse@bsc.edu http://businessnetworking.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/question-marks.jpg

  29. References & Resources Allen, D.W. & Clark, R.J. (1967). Microteaching: It’s rational. The High School Journal 51(2), 75-79. Allen, D. & Ryan, K. (1969). Microteaching. Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley. Amboi, F.A. (2005). Preservice teachers’ reflectivity on the sequence and consequences of teaching actions in a microteaching experience. Teaching Education Quarterly 32(1), 115-130. Grollman, E.A. (2014, June 24). Back from teaching bootcamp. Conditionally Accepted: A Space for Scholars on the Margins of Academia. Retrieved July 16 from http://conditionallyaccepted.com/2014/06/24/teaching-workshop/   Manning, M. (2014, July 21). From dean to student. University of Venus. Retrieved August 03 from https://www.insidehighered.com/blogs/university-venus/dean-student Nowik, N. (1983). Workshop on course design and teaching styles: A model for faculty development. To Improve the Academy 2, 151-168. Persellin, D. & Goodrick, T. (2010). Faculty development in higher education: Long-term impact of a summer teaching and learning workshop. Journal of the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning10(1),1-13. Retrieved July 16 from http://josotl.indiana.edu/article/viewFile/1731/1729