Download
slide1 n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Introduction PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Introduction

Introduction

93 Views Download Presentation
Download Presentation

Introduction

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Introduction • Why conduct this research? • To create a comprehensive database of fatalities that occurred in residential construction and specialty trades. • To describe the contributing factors of fatalities in residential construction and specialty trades. • Where did the data come from? • Fatalities that were recorded by the Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries (CFOI) from 2003-2006. • This time period was chosen because industry classifications changed from the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system to the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) in 2003.

  2. BLS Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries (CFOI) • What is CFOI? • CFOI is a Bureau of Labor Statistics database that collects fatality information from all 50 states and the District of Columbia. • CFOI uses a variety of sources to identify occupational fatalities, including: • OSHA reports, • Media accounts, • Death certificates, and • Workers compensation reports. • Two source documents are required to verify that the death was work-related.

  3. Industry Categories • Multi-family • Industry was new multi-family housing construction • Death occurred at a residential building taller than 40 feet or 3 stories • Fatality narrative included the term condo, apartment, elevator, or high rise • Residential • Industry was residential construction, new single-family housing construction, new housing operative builders, residential remodelers, residential specialty trade contractors, or land subdivision • Death occurred on a residential construction site • Fatality narrative included the term house, home, residence, family, garage, porch, chimney, driveway, or backyard • Nonresidential • Industry was nonresidential construction of buildings, nonresidential building construction, heavy and civil engineering construction, or nonresidential specialty trade contractors • Fatality narrative included the term steel erection, bridge, machine room, parking lot, water tank, silo, elevator, hotel, mill, plant, industrial, quarry, transformer, or hay bale

  4. Number of Fatalities by Industry Total = 4777 Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries

  5. Percent of Fatalities by Industry Total = 4777 Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries

  6. Fatalities by Year, 2003-2006 Total = 4777 Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries

  7. Fatalities by Event or Exposure Nonresidential N = 3232 Residential N = 1385 Multi-family N = 160 Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries

  8. Residential Construction and Specialty Trades • A total of 1,385 fatalities were identified as residential: • 35% were residential construction (N = 482) • 65% were residential specialty trades (N = 903) • Definitions: • Residential construction includes fatalities in: • Residential construction • New single-family housing construction • New housing operative builders • Residential remodeling • Residential specialty trades includes fatalities in: • Residential specialty trades (e.g., roofing contractors, electrical contractors, etc) • Land subdivision Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries

  9. Fatalities in Residential Construction by Industry 482 Total Residential Construction Fatalities 193 New Single-Family Housing Construction 126 Residential Remodelers 113 Residential Building Construction, Not Elsewhere Classified 40 Building Construction, Other Sectors 10 New Housing Operative Builders Residential construction, 2003-2006 Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries

  10. Fatalities in Residential Specialty Trades: Top Industries* 903 Total Residential Specialty Trade Fatalities 150 Roofing Contractors 97 Plumbing, Heating, and Air-Conditioning Contractors 91 Site Preparation Contractors 86 Painting and Wall Covering Contractors 73 Framing Contractors 57 Electrical Contractors 49 Masonry Contractors 48 All Other Special Trade Contractors 41 Finish Carpentry Contractors 37 Poured Concrete Foundation and Structure Contractors 33 Siding Contractors 31 Drywall and Insulation Contractors Residential specialty trades, 2003-2006 Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries *Specialty trades with more than 30 fatalities are listed

  11. Industry vs. Occupation • The occupation describes the fatally-injured worker. • The industry describes the employer of the fatally-injured worker. • Example: • In the case of a construction manager working for a roofing contractor, the industry would be roofing contractors, but the occupation would be construction managers. • This explains why there were 150 deaths in the industry of ‘roofing contractors’ but only 113 deaths in the occupational category of ‘roofers’. Residential construction and specialty trades, 2003-2006 Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries

  12. Fatalities by Occupation* 984 Total Fatalities 376 Construction Laborers 230 Carpenters 113 Roofers 103 First-Line Supervisors/Managers of Construction Trades and Extraction Workers 93 Construction Managers 84 Painters, Construction and Maintenance 46 Electricians 38 Operating Engineers and Other Construction Equipment Operators 30 Heating, Air Conditioning, and Refrigeration Mechanics and Installers 29 Plumbers, Pipefitters, and Steamfitters 28 Truck Drivers, Heavy and Tractor-Trailer 27 Drywall and Ceiling Tile Installers Residential construction and specialty trades, 2003-2006 Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries *Occupations with more than 20 fatalities are listed

  13. Fatalities by Race and Hispanic Origin Total = 1385 Residential construction and specialty trades, 2003-2006 Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries

  14. Fatalities by Time of Day Total = 1385 Residential construction and specialty trades, 2003-2006 Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries

  15. Fatalities by Day of the Week Total = 1385 Residential construction and specialty trades, 2003-2006 Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries

  16. Fatalities by Establishment Size (number of employees) Total = 1002 Residential construction and specialty trades, 2003-2006 Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries *Establishment size was not reported for 383 fatalities

  17. Fatalities by Length of Service (time with employer) Total = 309 Residential construction and specialty trades, 2003-2006 Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries *Establishment size was not reported for 1076 fatalities

  18. Fatalities by Nature of Injury Total = 1385 Residential construction and specialty trades, 2003-2006 Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries

  19. Fatalities by Event or Exposure The main causes of fatal injury were: • 602 Falls • 251 Contact with Objects and Equipment • 248 Exposure to Harmful Substances and Environments • 199 Transportation Accidents • 48 Assaults and Violent Acts • 34 Fires and Explosions Total = 1385 Residential construction and specialty trades, 2003-2006 Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries

  20. Fatalities by Event or Exposure Residential construction and specialty trades, 2003-2006 Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries

  21. Falls Residential construction and specialty trades, 2003-2006 Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries

  22. Falls • Falls from a roof (232 total) • Fall from roof edge (138) • Fall through skylight (10) • Fall through existing roof opening (7) • Falls from floor, dock, or ground level (47 total) • Fall through existing floor opening (32) • Fall through floor surface (7) Residential construction and specialty trades, 2003-2006 Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries

  23. What was different about Fall fatalities? • Workers were older than average • 52% were aged 45 years and older • More were foreign-born • 32% were born outside the U.S. • More died from head injuries • 51% of deaths were the result of a head injury • Fatalities were most common in August (66) and October (65) • Most falls happened Monday through Thursday (falls were NOT more likely to occur on the weekend) Residential construction and specialty trades, 2003-2006 Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries

  24. Falls – Industry and Occupation • Top 3 Residential Construction (239 total): • New Single-Family Housing Construction (94) • Residential Remodelers (63) • Residential Building Construction, not elsewhere classified (53) • Top 3 Residential Specialty Trades (363 total): • Roofing Contractors (119) • Framing Contractors (55) • Painting and Wall Covering Contractors (46) • Top Occupational Categories (602 total): • Carpenters (153) • Construction laborers (140) • Roofers (91) • Painters, construction and maintenance (51) • Construction managers (35) • First-Line Supervisors/Managers of Construction Trades and Extraction Workers (35) Residential construction and specialty trades, 2003-2006 Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries

  25. Falls • 94 fall descriptions mentioned safety equipment • 80 fatalities noted a lack of safety equipment • 11 fatalities noted that safety equipment was misused, failed, or not yet setup • 360 fall descriptions reported the height of the fall* • Less than 6 feet 6 fatalities • 6 to 10 feet 40 fatalities • 10 to 15 feet 90 fatalities • 15 to 25 feet 152 fatalities • 25 to 40 feet 72 fatalities *Fall height was reported for 60% of the fall fatalities; falls from greater than 40 feet were coded as multi-family Residential construction and specialty trades, 2003-2006 Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries

  26. Contact with Objects and Equipment Total = 251 Residential construction and specialty trades, 2003-2006 Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries

  27. Contact with Objects and Equipment • The top sources of injury included: • Dirt, earth (31) • Walls (19) • Trucks (15) • Excavating machinery (14), 11 of which were backhoes • Ditches, channels, trenches, excavations (12) • Loaders (11), 6 of which were front end loaders • Bricks, blocks, and structural stone (11) • Trees, logs (10) • The top secondary sources were: • Excavating machinery (8) • Cranes (7) • Jacks (7) • Weather and atmospheric conditions (7) • Trees, logs (6) • Ditches, channels, trenches, excavations(6) Residential construction and specialty trades, 2003-2006 Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries

  28. Exposure to Harmful Substances or Environments Total = 248 Residential construction and specialty trades, 2003-2006 Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries

  29. Exposure to Harmful Substances or Environments • Contact with electric current (164 fatalities) • Event: • Contact with overhead power lines (76) • Contact with wiring, transformers, or other electrical components (55) • Contact with electric current of machine, tool, appliance, or light fixture (21) • Struck by lightning (8) • Nature of the injury: • Nearly all were electrocutions or electric shocks • Source: • Electrical wiring (37) • Ladders (32) • Power lines, transformers, convertors (15) • Air conditioning units (8) • Lightening (8) • Secondary source: • Power lines, transformers, convertors (68) • Electrical wiring (8) Residential construction and specialty trades, 2003-2006 Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries

  30. Exposure to Harmful Substances or Environments • Exposure to caustic, noxious, or allergenic substances (53 fatalities) • Event: • Inhalation of substance (33) • Ingestion of substance (13) • Injections, stings, venomous bites (5) • Nature of the injury: • Most were poisonings and toxic effects • Source: • Carbon monoxide (20) • Drugs and medicines (17) • Paint, lacquer, shellac, varnish, not elsewhere classified (5) • Secondary source: • Generators (13) • Buildings- office, plant, residential (5) Residential construction and specialty trades, 2003-2006 Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries

  31. Transportation Accidents • Highway accidents (101 total) • Collision between vehicles, mobile equipment (46) • Vehicle struck stationary object, equipment on side of road (26) • Non-collision accident (26 total) • Jack-knifed or overturned (23) • Non-highway accident, except rail, air, water (53 total) • Overturned (31) • Fell from and struck by vehicle or mobile equipment (14) • Pedestrian, non-passenger struck by vehicle, mobile equipment (37 total) • In parking lot or non-roadway area (27) • In roadway (9) Residential construction and specialty trades, 2003-2006 Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries

  32. Assaults and Violent Acts • There were 48 assaults and violent acts • Shootings (23) • Suicides (17) • Industry: • Residential remodelers (19) • New single-family construction (8) • Finish carpentry contractors (5) • Occupation: • Carpenters (12) • Construction laborers (11) • First-Line Supervisors/Managers of Construction Trades and Extraction Workers (8) • 52% were self-employed Residential construction and specialty trades, 2003-2006 Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries

  33. Non-OSHA regulated fatalities • Some of the fatalities are NOT regulated by OSHA (e.g., self-employed workers, highway accidents, assaults, etc.) Not regulated by OSHA (36%)

  34. www.nahb.org/fatalitystudy