Cs 101
Download
1 / 35

CS 101 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 353 Views
  • Updated On :

CS 101. Today’s class will start 5 minutes late (and we’ll be talking about textbook and lab scheduling problems then). CS 101 Introduction to Computer Science. Aaron Bloomfield University of Virginia Fall 2006. Instructors. Aaron Bloomfield: CS 101 Office: Olsson 228D

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'CS 101' - azana


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
Cs 101

CS 101

Today’s class will start 5 minutes late

(and we’ll be talking about textbook and lab scheduling problems then)


Cs 101 introduction to computer science

CS 101Introduction to Computer Science

Aaron Bloomfield

University of Virginia

Fall 2006


Instructors
Instructors

  • Aaron Bloomfield: CS 101

    • Office: Olsson 228D

    • Office hours will be posted on the website

    • Email:

  • Kevin Sullivan: CS 101-E

    • Office: Olsson 212

    • Office hours will be posted on the website

    • Email:

  • Both instructors also accept appointments

  • Other course personnel (TAs) will be posted on the website


What this course is
What this course is

  • An introduction to programming using Java


What this course is not
What this course is not

  • We do not talk about (in any depth):

    • Applications of computing

    • Other programming languages (C, C++, Matlab, etc.)

    • History of computing (well, not much)

    • How to use Microsoft office or create a web page


Course objectives
Course objectives

  • Understand fundamentals of programming such as variables, conditional and iterative execution, methods, etc.

  • Understand fundamentals of object-oriented programming in Java, including defining classes, invoking methods, using class libraries, etc.

  • Gain exposure to the important topics and principles of software development.

  • Have the ability to write Java computer programs to solve specified problems.

  • Be able to use the Java SDK environment to create, debug and run simple Java programs.


Honor policy
Honor Policy

  • Honor Policy: The University of Virginia Honor Policy is in effect in this class. As a student in the course you also agree to follow the following principles.

    • Unless otherwise specified, the only allowed collaboration for the homeworks and labs is the discussion of ideas; no collaboration is allowed on the exams and lab quizzes.

    • No code or solutions are to be distributed to other students either electronically (i.e. e-mail) or on paper. If you are looking at another student's code, you are in violation of this honor policy.

    • Unless otherwise noted, exams and individual assignments are pledged: you promise that you have neither given nor received unauthorized help.

    • When there is doubt regarding the honorability of an action, you will ask before doing it.


Honor policy1
Honor Policy

  • Honor Policy: The University of Virginia Honor Policy is in effect in this class. As a student in the course you also agree to follow the following principles.

    • When there is doubt regarding the honorability of an action, you will ask before doing it.

    • You are not allowed to describe problems on an exam or quiz to a student who has not taken it yet. You are not allowed to show exam papers to another student or view another student's exam papers while working on an exam.

    • You are not allowed to debug your fellow student's code – there is ample teaching assistant support, and they can help debug code. This will be discussed in more detail once we start getting into writing (and debugging) Java programs.

    • You may not use another students 'clicker' during lecture (we will be discussing clickers shortly).


Honor policy2
Honor policy

  • Any honor violation or cheating will be referred to the honor committee, and will result in an immediate failure for the course, regardless of the outcome of the honor trial or your other grades.

  • No exceptions!


Website
Website

  • At http://www.cs.virginia.edu/~cs101

  • The syllabus is there (with most of the info in this slide set)

    • And all the lecture notes

  • I will try to post all slide sets on the website the night before lecture

    • But will probably be editing them that day

  • Don’t bother writing down what’s on the slides!


Things to buy
Things to buy

  • You need to acquire 4 things for this course

    • The textbook

    • A clicker

    • A clicker license

    • A CodeLab license

  • All are discussed here in detail


Textbook
Textbook

  • Java 5.0 Program Design, McGraw-Hil.

    • Cohoon and Davidson

  • A rough schedule of what we will be covering when is on the website

  • The bookstore had the wrong one

    • The new one should be arriving shortly, and will cost $113



Clickers
Clickers

  • These are RF “remote controls”

    • Allow me to ask questions during class and get responses from everybody

    • Very useful in large lecture halls…

    • The bookstore (will) have them shortly

  • In addition to the physical clicker, you will also need a license

    • The license comes with the textbook


Codelab license
CodeLab license

  • An online system we will use later

  • License comes with the textbook

  • Don’t throw it out!


How to get all of this
How to get all of this?

  • If you buy the shrink-wrapped book in the bookstore

    • It comes with both licenses

    • Then you only need to by the clicker

      • Which the bookstore will also have

  • If you acquire a used textbook

    • You can still get the clicker in the bookstore

    • The licenses need to be purchased online

  • Everybody must get all four things (sorry about the cost!)


Keeping the class interesting
Keeping the class interesting

  • Like many intro courses, this course does not really show why CS is a fascinating field

    • I’ll be bringing in guest lecturers to give short (5 minute) talks about why they like CS

      • At the beginning of lecture

  • Humor breaks

    • Actually helps with attention span!

    • Not surprisingly, most of it will be computer humor!




Grading criteria
Grading criteria

  • 10% – Laboratory participation

    • However, if you miss more than 2 labs, you are subject to failure for the course

    • More on this in a bit…

  • 10% – Laboratory programming quizzes

  • 30% – Homework assignments

  • 30% – Midterms

    • 27 September, 25 October, and 29 November

  • 20% – Final exam

    • Scheduled time is Thursday, 14 December from 7 pm. to 10 pm

      • NOT on Friday

    • We will discuss conflicts as the semester progresses (APMA 310, ECON 201 (sections 100 and 200), and ECON 401)

  • Will be following the standard 10-point curve scale


Grades
Grades

  • All grades will be kept online

    • Viewing your grades will be gone over in the first lab

  • All electronically submitted assignments (labs, HWs, lab quizzes) will be graded electronically

    • They are still graded by a human, of course

    • You will receive an e-mail about your grade

  • Only the exams will be graded via paper


Regrades
Regrades

  • When an assignment is graded, the grading guidelines will be posted

  • If you feel you deserve more credit, you need to submit a regrade

    • Paper-based for the exams

    • Electronically for labs, HWs, and lab quizzes

  • Regrades must be submitted within 10 (ten) days

  • More on regrades in the first lab

  • We reserve the right to possibly institute a “penalty” on “whiny” regrades


Homeworks
Homeworks

  • There are two types of homeworks:

  • Programming homeworks

    • a.k.a. “J” homeworks, as they use Java

    • 8 of them

  • CodeLab (a.k.a. “C”) homeworks

    • Via http://www.turingscraft.com – an online service

    • This will require purchasing a $20 license (online)

    • 5 (or so) of them this semester

    • All the CodeLab problems will count as one or two J homework(s)

    • We will go over CodeLab in a future class


Labs

  • Will have one each week

    • Total of 11 (or so) throughout the semester

  • Lab attendance is REQUIRED

    • If you miss more than 2 labs, you are subject to course failure for the course

    • If you show up to a different lab section without permission, it counts as missing that lab

    • There ARE labs this first week

  • Lab grading will be discussed in the first lab

  • If you don’t finish the lab during lab period, you can finish it within the next 24 hours

    • More details on this in the first lab

  • If for a valid reason you are unable to do your lab, there will be a make-up lab on Sunday night, provided that you get permission prior to your scheduled lab


Lab scheduling problems
Lab scheduling problems

  • I expect about 20 students will switch into CS 101-E

    • Using last fall semester as a guide

  • That will free up space in all the lab sections

  • If you are not registered for a lab section this week, you can go to any lab

    • But only if you aren’t registered for any lab section!

  • We will get everybody registered for a lab section that fits their schedule


Exams
Exams

  • There will be three midterms, all pledged

    • 27 September, 25 October, and 29 November

  • There will be three lab quizzes, all pledged

    • During lab sections the week of the midterms

  • The tests are going to be hard!

  • Final exam

    • Scheduled time is Thursday, 14 December from 7 pm. to 10 pm

      • NOT on Friday

    • We will discuss conflicts as the semester progresses (APMA 310, ECON 201 (sections 100 and 200), and ECON 401)


Home directory service
Home directory service

  • All assignments and lab files must be kept on your home directory

    • http://www.virginia.edu/homedir


My philosophy hard but fair
My philosophy: hard but fair

  • Fairness is a difficult thing in a class of 450 students

  • If you feel something is not fair, you need to let me know

    • I will do my best to correct it

  • If you think that this course is not hard, let me know

    • I will do my best to correct it


Who to contact
Who to contact

  • I am not always the best person

    • I easily get inundated with emails, as I have hundreds of students

    • The TAs can often answer a question just as easily as I can, and much quicker

    • There will be a dedicated graduate TA for grading issues

  • Office hours will be posted on the website

  • There will be a lot of TA office hours

    • Utilize them!!!


Feedback
Feedback

  • It’s a very good thing!

  • Feel free to leave us feedback

    • Can be done anonymously, if you wish

      • Via the Toolkit or the CS dept website

  • It’s hard for the instructors to know what the students think of the course…


Learning the material
Learning the material

  • There are a number of ways we provide to help you learn the material

    • Lecture

    • Slides on the website

    • Programming homeworks

    • CodeLab homeworks

    • Labs

    • Textbook

    • Previous years’ tests

    • TAs (during labs or office hours)

    • Professors (office hours)

    • Fellow students

  • Find what works best for you and use it


Sections
Sections

  • CS 101

    • Students have little or no programming experience

    • Mandatory scheduled closed labs

  • CS 101-E

    • Students with programming experience

    • Open labs that are to be completed by a scheduled time

  • 101 & 101-E students take same quizzes and tests, and do the same assignments

  • The 10-point curve is the same for everybody

    • So helping your fellow students out does not hurt you


Differences with 101 e
Differences with 101-E

  • Labs are done by all 101-E students on their own time

    • If you miss more than 2, you are still subject to failure

    • Labs due 8:30 p.m. on Sunday

    • Optional lab session for 101-E students Sunday at 7 p.m.

  • Pace through the textbook is the same

    • They may go through it in more detail, though

  • The following is assumed for students in 101-E

    • You have taken a course in programming

      • Thus, you know the basics of programming

      • You will need to sign a pledge stating this

    • You did not get a 4 or a 5 on the AB level AP computer science exam, or a 5 on the A level AP exam


Should you be in 101 e
Should you be in 101-E?

  • If you have had a semester’s worth of programming, then yes

  • Stay to the end of this lecture, then start going to the other section next time

    • Meets in MEC 341



ad