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INTERNATIONAL TANKER OWNERS POLLUTION FEDERATION LIMITED. Marine chemical spill: an overview of response issues. Stéphane Grenon Technical adviser ITOPF Intertanko Chemical Tanker Committee Singapore November 11, 2004. Outline. ITOPF Issues with marine chemical spills

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marine chemical spill an overview of response issues

INTERNATIONAL TANKER OWNERS

POLLUTION FEDERATION LIMITED

Marine chemical spill: an overview of response issues

Stéphane Grenon

Technical adviser

ITOPF

Intertanko Chemical Tanker Committee

Singapore

November 11, 2004

outline
Outline
  • ITOPF
  • Issues with marine chemical spills
  • What is expected from ship owners?

M/V Accord, China

slide3

What is ITOPF ?

International Tanker Owners Pollution Federation

slide4

What is ITOPF ?

  • Established in 1968,

following Torrey Canyon

  • Small not for profit org.

based in London

  • Technical Advisers

(Biologists, Chemists,

Engineers)

  • International Service
slide5

ITOPF MEMBERS

  • Tanker owners & bareboat charters
  • > 8,400 tankers
  • 196 million GT
  • ~98% of world’s tonnage

ASSOCIATES

  • All other types of ship
  • 310 million GT
  • > ½ of spills attended
slide7

ROLE ON SITE

  • Respond on behalf of members, clubs, IOPC Fund
  • Advise and assist all parties on most effective clean-up to minimise resource damage
  • Always advisory
  • Offer guidance on likely admissibility of claims (reasonableness)
  • Monitor events, clean-up activities and investigate damage to coastal resources
slide8

Technical Services

  • Response to marine oil & chemical spills
  • Damage assessment & claims analysis
  • Contingency planning & advisory work
  • Training, seminars, conferences
  • Information services
          • Publications
          • Databases
          • Website:

www.itopf.com

itopf and chemical spill response
ITOPF and chemical spill response
  • Internal working group
  • ITOPF response procedure
    • Training
    • Reference materials
    • Link with other partners (industry, governments)
    • Contract with UK National Chemical Emergency Centre (NCEC)
itopf objectives
ITOPF Objectives

To parallel our role with respect to oil spills and to provide prompt advice to our ship-owners and their insurers in the event of:

  • An emergency
  • General enquiries
  • HNS Convention
  • OPRC-HNS Protocol

M.V. ‘ACCORD’, China, Oct. 2002

chemicals other substances itopf s involvement recently
Chemicals & Other Substances- ITOPF’s Involvement Recently
  • Incidents Attended
    • ‘CO-OP VENTURE’ Japan, July 2002 (Oil & Corn)
    • ‘JOLLY RUBINO’, South Africa, Sept. 2002 (Oil & Class 3 hazard)
    • ‘ACCORD’, China, Oct. 2002 (Methyl methacrylate, Polypropylene Glycol Methyl Ether Acetate)
    • ‘FU SHAN HAI’, Sweden, June 2003 (Oil & potassium chloride)
    • ‘TASMAN SPIRIT’, Pakistan, July 2003 (Iranian Light crude oil)
    • ‘BOW MARINER’, USA, March 2004 (oil & ethanol)
  • Incidents Notified
    • ‘IRINA 2’, Papua New Guinea, July 2002 (Palm Oil)
    • ‘BOW EAGLE’, UK, August 2002 (Ethyl acetate)
    • ‘TAI PING’, New Zealand, Oct. 2002 (Urea)
    • ‘METIN KA’, Turkey, Dec, 2002, (Sulphuric acid) / Jan. 2004, Oman (Ethanol)
    • ‘JAMBO’, UK, June 2003 (Zinc concentrate & Cadmium)
    • ‘PANAM SERRENA, Sardinia, Italy, January 2004 (Benzene)
risks
Risks
  • HNS spills not as frequent as oil spills
  • Quantities spilled can be small
    • Chemical tanker: 40000 m3 - 150000 m3 (many products onboard)
    • Container: 10m3
    • ICB: 1m3
    • Drum: 200 litres
  • But effects can be large!
    • 1 tonne chlorine = 4.8 km safety zone
risks1
Risks
  • Response might be complex
    • Wide variety of products
    • Wide variety of behaviour
    • Wide variety of toxicity
    • Effects on marine environment not well known
    • Response technologies not as developed as oil
    • Potential effects on population more severe than oil
slide15

The OPRC-HNS Protocol(Protocol on Preparedness, Response and Co-operation to Pollution Incidents by Hazardous and Noxious Substances, 2000)

  • Requires national & regional systems for preparedness and response to HNS incidents.
  • Calls for co-operation between governments, port authorities, shipping industry and the chemical industry.
oprc hns protocol
OPRC-HNS Protocol

Enters into force 12 months after 15 States

have ratified the Protocol.

Current Status = Ratified by 9 States

(Ecuador, Greece, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Singapore, Sweden, Uruguay, Vanuatu)

IMO encouraging early ratification of both OPRC-HNS Protocol

and the HNS Convention to provide maximum protection in the

event of an HNS incident.

chemical emergency response
Chemical emergency response

Accident

Alert

Substance (s)

Hazard

Assessment

Behaviour

Sensitive resources

Health & Safety

Evaluate

Plan

Strategies

Execute

need for information
Need for information
  • Access to the ship/cargo owner is critical
  • A strong communication link between owner and responders will be necessary!
  • Information on substance is critical

M/V Panam Serrena, Italy

which information
Which information?
  • Name and identification number
      • UN or CAS number, identification markings
      • type of packaging
  • Emergency contact number
  • Quantity on board or spilled
  • MSDS, bill of lading, stowage plans, cargo manifest

M/V Jolly Rubinno, South Africa

which information1
Which information?
  • Name and contact details of the ship’s agent or shipper or manufacturer
  • Container/package type, size and quantity, condition
  • Local environmental conditions (weather, temperature, sea conditions, wind speed and direction)
  • Length, breadth and appearance of any slicks or plumes, including direction of movement and behaviour (i.e. floating, sinking, colour, odour, reaction, etc.)
which information2
Which information?
  • Have there been reports of any injuries or adverse effects to human health or the environment?
  • Proximity to sensitive resources and residential areas
  • Notification of emergency services, local / national authorities
chemical response summary
Chemical responseSummary
  • More complex than oil spill response
    • Behaviour
    • Hazards
    • Health & Safety
  • Responders and population more at risk
  • Must have a contingency plan!
    • Experts (chemical + health)
    • Local authorities (protection of population)
    • Tools
chemical response summary1
Chemical responseSummary
  • Most of the information to start the response is with the ship owner/agent
  • Must be ready to transfer that information in the initial moments of an incident