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Geometry Representations of Three-Dimensional Figures. Warm Up. Find the two numbers. The sum of two numbers is 30. The difference between 2 times the first number and 2 times the second number is 20 .

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Geometry representations of three dimensional figures

GeometryRepresentations of Three-Dimensional Figures

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Warm up
Warm Up

  • Find the two numbers.

  • The sum of two numbers is 30. The difference between 2 times the first number and 2 times the second number is 20.

  • The difference between the first number and the second number is 7. When the second number is added to 4 times the first number, the result is 38.

  • The second number is 5 more than the first number. Their sum is 5.

  • x = 20; y = 10

  • x = 7; y = 2

  • 3) x = 5; y = 0

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Representations of Three-Dimensional

Figures

There are many ways to represent a three-dimensional object. An orthographic drawing shows six different views of an object: top, bottom, front, back, left side, and right side.

Top

Back

Front

Right

Left

Bottom

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Drawing Orthographic Views of an Object

Draw all six orthographic views of the given object.

Assume there are no hidden cubes.

Top:

Bottom:

Back:

Front:

Left:

Right:

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Now you try!

1) Draw all six orthographic views of the given object.

assume there are no hidden cubes.

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Isometric drawing is a way to show three sides of a figure from a corner view. You can use isometric dot paper to make an isometric drawing. This paper has diagonal rows of dots that are equally spaced in a repeating triangular pattern.

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Drawing an isometric View of an Object

Draw an isometric view of the given object. assume there are no hidden cubes.

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Now you try!

2) Draw an isometric view of the given object. assume there are no hidden cubes.

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In a perspective drawing, nonvertical parallel lines are drawn so that they meet at a point called a vanishing point. Vanishing point are located on a horizontal line called the horizon. A one-point perspective drawing contains one vanishing points. A two-point perspective drawing contains two vanishing points.

Vanishing point s

Vanishing point

one-point perspective

two-point perspective

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Drawing an Object in Perspective

3 A) Draw a cube in one-point perspective.

Draw a horizontal line to represent the horizon. Mark a vanishing point on the horizon. This is the front of the cube.

From each corner of the square, lightly draw dashed segments to the vanishing point.

Next page 

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Lightly draw a smaller square with vertices on the dashed segments. This is the back of the cube.

Draw the edges of the cube, using dashed segments for hidden edges. Erase any segments that are not part of the cube.

Next page 

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B) Draw a rectangular prism in two-point perspective. segments. This is the back of the cube.

From each endpoint of the segment, lightly draw dashed segments to each vanishing point. Draw two vertical segments connecting the dashed lines. These are other vertical edges of the prism.

Draw a horizontal line to represent the horizon. Mark two vanishing points on the horizon. Then draw a vertical segment below the horizon and between the vanishing points. This is the front edge of the prism.

Next page 

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Lightly draw dashed segments from each endpoint of the two vertical segments to the vanishing points.

Draw the edges of the prism, using dashed lines for hidden edges. Erase any lines that are not part of the prism.

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Now you try! vertical segments to the vanishing points.

3 a) Draw the block letter L in one-point perspective.

b) Draw the block letter L in two-point perspective.

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Relating Different Representations of an Object vertical segments to the vanishing points.

4) Determine whether each drawing represents the given object. Assume there are no hidden cubes.

B

A

No; the figure in the drawing is made up of four cubes, and the object is made up of only three cubes.

Yes; the drawing is a one-point perspective view of the object.

Next page 

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C vertical segments to the vanishing points.

D

Top

Back

Right

Left

Front

Bottom

No; the cubes that share a face in the object do not share a face in the drawing.

Yes; the drawing shows the six orthographic views of the object.

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Now you try! vertical segments to the vanishing points.

4) Determine whether drawing represents the given object. Assume there are no hidden cubes.

Top

Back

Front

Right

Left

Bottom

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Now some problems for you to practice ! vertical segments to the vanishing points.

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Assessment vertical segments to the vanishing points.

1) In a(n) ? Drawing, the vanishing point are located on the horizon. (orthographic, isometric, or perspective)

  • perspective

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2)Draw all six orthographic views of the each object. vertical segments to the vanishing points.

Assume there are no hidden cubes.

a)

b)

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3) Draw an isometric view of the given object. assume there are no hidden cubes.

b)

a)

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4) Draw each object in one-point and two-point perspectives. Assume there are no hidden cubes.

a) Rectangular prism b) block letter

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5) Determine whether each drawing represents the given object. Assume there are no hidden cubes.

a)

b)

c)

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Let’s review object. Assume there are no hidden cubes.

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Representations of Three-Dimensional object. Assume there are no hidden cubes.

Figures

There are many ways to represent a three-dimensional object. An orthographic drawing shows six different views of an object: top, bottom, front, back, left side, and right side.

Top

Back

Front

Right

Left

Bottom

CONFIDENTIAL


Drawing Orthographic Views of an Object object. Assume there are no hidden cubes.

Draw all six orthographic views of the given object.

Assume there are no hidden cubes.

Top:

Bottom:

Back:

Front:

Left:

Right:

CONFIDENTIAL


Isometric drawing object. Assume there are no hidden cubes.is a way to show three sides of a figure from a corner view. You can use isometric dot paper to make an isometric drawing. This paper has diagonal rows of dots that are equally spaced in a repeating triangular pattern.

CONFIDENTIAL


Drawing an isometric View of an Object object. Assume there are no hidden cubes.

Draw an isometric view of the given object. assume there are no hidden cubes.

CONFIDENTIAL


In a object. Assume there are no hidden cubes.perspective drawing, nonvertical parallel lines are drawn so that they meet at a point called a vanishing point. Vanishing point are located on a horizontal line called the horizon. A one-point perspective drawing contains one vanishing points. A two-point perspective drawing contains two vanishing points.

Vanishing point s

Vanishing point

one-point perspective

two-point perspective

CONFIDENTIAL


Drawing an Object in Perspective object. Assume there are no hidden cubes.

3 A) Draw a cube in one-point perspective.

Draw a horizontal line to represent the horizon. Mark a vanishing point on the horizon. This is the front of the cube.

From each corner of the square, lightly draw dashed segments to the vanishing point.

Next page 

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Lightly draw a smaller square with vertices on the dashed segments. This is the back of the cube.

Draw the edges of the cube, using dashed segments for hidden edges. Erase any segments that are not part of the cube.

Next page 

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B) Draw a rectangular prism in two-point perspective. segments. This is the back of the cube.

From each endpoint of the segment, lightly draw dashed segments to each vanishing point. Draw two vertical segments connecting the dashed lines. These are other vertical edges of the prism.

Draw a horizontal line to represent the horizon. Mark two vanishing points on the horizon. Then draw a vertical segment below the horizon and between the vanishing points. This is the front edge of the prism.

Next page 

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Lightly draw dashed segments from each endpoint of the two vertical segments to the vanishing points.

Draw the edges of the prism, using dashed lines for hidden edges. Erase any lines that are not part of the prism.

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Relating Different Representations of an Object vertical segments to the vanishing points.

4) Determine whether each drawing represents the given object. Assume there are no hidden cubes.

B

A

No; the figure in the drawing is made up of four cubes, and the object is made up of only three cubes.

Yes; the drawing is a one-point perspective view of the object.

Next page 

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C vertical segments to the vanishing points.

D

Top

Back

Right

Left

Front

Bottom

No; the cubes that share a face in the object do not share a face in the drawing.

Yes; the drawing shows the six orthographic views of the object.

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You did a great job today
You did a vertical segments to the vanishing points.great job today!

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