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Differentiating Instruction in a Whole-Group Setting. Roman Numerals. I II III IV V VI VII VIII IX X. XI XII XIII XIV XV XVI XVII XVIII. Question to Ponder. What’s more important, the question or the answer?. Use More Questions Than Answers Page 28.

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roman numerals
Roman Numerals
  • I
  • II
  • III
  • IV
  • V
  • VI
  • VII
  • VIII
  • IX
  • X
  • XI
  • XII
  • XIII
  • XIV
  • XV
  • XVI
  • XVII
  • XVIII
question to ponder
Question to Ponder
  • What’s more important, the question or the answer?
use more questions than answers page 28
Use More Questions Than AnswersPage 28
  • The brain is more receptive to questions than answers.
  • Allow students to generate questions.
  • How and why questions require more thought than who and what questions.

HOW?

WHY?

Jensen, E. (1997)

slide5
Hmmm…
  • On average, teachers ask 80 questions each hour.
  • AND . . . Students only ask TWO (Kagan, 1999).
  • Seinfeld Clip
give me five five critical questions to ask while reading 34 101
Give Me Five!Five Critical Questions to Ask While Reading (34, 101)
  • What mental pictures do I see? (Visualization)
  • What does this remind me of? (Connection)
  • What do I know, even though I wasn’t told this information in the text? (Inference)
  • What might happen next? (Prediction)
  • What was this mostly about? (Summarization)

Hollas, B. (2005)

summarizing
Summarizing

Review components of a summary. Most summaries include the who, the what, the when, the where, the why and the how.

  • Who: Chewy Louie
  • What: Chewed everything
  • When: All the time
  • Where: Everywhere
  • Why: He was a puppy
  • How: Happily
slide11

Let’s try a 16 word summary.

What kind of puppy?

,a little black puppy,

,a puppy,

Write a concise summary … and then STRETCH it out.

How did he chew?

his

happily

slide12

Sixteen Word Summary

  • Chewy Louie, a little black puppy, happily chewed everything in his sight until he grew up.
slide16

Page 31: Differentiated Wait Time

  • Thinking takes time.
  • WAIT – Pair/Share – Hands
q a r pages 42 111 115
Q.A.R.Pages42, 111-115

QAR

(Raphael, 1982, 1984)

In

My

Head

In

The

Book

Right

There

On My Own

Think &

Search

Author and Me

q a r 43
Q.A.R. (43)
  • Right There: How is a batting average calculated?
  • Think, Search, Find: How are batting averages used? (answer in several places)
  • Author and Me: How much higher is Player C’s batting average than Player A’s?
  • On My Own: Are you a baseball fan? Explain.

Hollas, B. (2005)

dog breath
Dog Breath
  • What was Hally’s big problem?
  • What were the different things the Tosis family did to get rid of Hally’s bad breath?
  • What made the burglars think that Hally was big and mean and scary?
  • Have you ever had a special pet? Tell me about it.
anticipation guide page 83 if you hopped like a frog
Anticipation Guide Page 83 If You Hopped Like a Frog

____ If you were as strong as

an ant, you could lift a bus.

____ If you ate like a shrew,

you could eat 50 hamburgers every hour in a day.

____

____

Cunningham, P., Hall, D., Cunningham, J. (2000)

nonfiction
NONFICTION

BEFORE AFTER

  • _____ Chlorophyll is green. _____
  • _____ The stomata allow oxygen _____

to exit through the topside

of leaves.

  • _____ Photosynthesis is a process_____

that changes oxygen into

sugar.

sequencing
SEQUENCING

BEFORE AFTER

  • ____ Civil War ____
  • ____ Revolutionary War ____
  • ____ Gulf War ____
  • ____ War of 1812 ____
  • ____ World War II ____
games
Games
  • Play speeds up the brain’s maturation process since it involves the build-in processes of challenge, novelty, feedback, coherence and time. (Jensen, 2001)
  • The effectiveness of a game is enhanced when students actually help to design or construct it. (Wolfe, 2001)
  • http://cherylsclassroomtipsdi.blogspot.com/2008/11/petes-powerpoint-station-free-resource.html
i have who has 40
I Have . . . Who Has??? (40)

Toonaday.com

Hollas, B. (2005)

written by laurence pringle illustrated by meryl henderson

Guess the

Covered Word

Phonics Lesson

Written by:

Laurence Pringle

Illustrated by:

Meryl Henderson

slide29

The biggest sharks in the oceans are gentle creatures with tiny teeth. The whale shark, basking shark, and the smaller megamouth shark all eat small animals and plants called plankton. The sharks swim along with their huge mouths open. All of the drifting plankton are engulfed, filtered from the water, and swallowed.

jigsaw page 61
Jigsaw Page 61
  • Base Group:
  • Expert Group:
  • Number Ones: Cubing and Blooms (38)
  • Number Twos: Question-Tac-Toe (44)
  • Number Threes: D.E.A.Q. (45)
  • Number Fours: F.R.E.D. (Page 47)
jigsaw three step interview
Jigsaw/Three-Step Interview
  • Students interview a partner and each then share with teammates what they learned.
    • Teacher divides up reading sections for 1s, 2, 3s, 4s.
    • #1s all read same section, etc.
    • After silent processing, students meet with like numbers in corners.
    • Students collect students from other corners to end up with a 1,2,3 and 4 in each group.
    • Each group identifies an eyeball partner.
    • These partners pair and teach each other their reading section.
    • Each partner must clarify what he/she heard from the other.
      • In pairs Student A interviews Student B.
      • Pairs switch roles: Student B interviews Student A.
    • RoundRobin: Pairs pair to form groups of four. Each student, in turn, shares with the team what he/she learned in the interview.
    • Modified from a Kagan Cooperative Learning Structure
types of groups
Types of Groups
  • Whole Group
  • Heterogeneous Groups
  • Homogeneous Groups
  • Independent/

Individual Work

Hollas, B. (2005)

tiered assignments
Tiered Assignments

Tiering is a differentiated instructional planning strategy that enables educators to teach one concept at multiple levels of complexity based on student readiness levels.

  • Early Readiness
  • Readiness
  • Advanced Readiness
developing a tiered assignment
Developing a Tiered Assignment
  • Know:
  • Understand:
  • Be Able to Do:
slide37

Content

Process

Product

i m done what do i do now
I’m done . . .What do I do now??

What are anchor activities?

  • specified ongoing activities on which students work independently
  • ongoing assignments that students can work on throughout a unit

Why use anchor activities?

  • provide a strategy for teachers to deal with “ragged time” when students complete work at different times
  • they allow the teacher to work with individual students or groups
  • provides ongoing activities that relate to the content of the unit
  • allow the teacher to develop independent group work strategies in order to incorporate a mini lab of computers in classroom

Hollas, B. (2005)

anchor activity ideas
Anchor Activity Ideas
  • Anchor Activities . . .
    • Silent Reading
    • 4-6-8 – Page 69, 137
    • R.A.F.T. – Page 70, 71
    • Magazine Pictures –
      • List nouns
      • Add adjectives
      • Verbs
      • Add adverbs

Hollas, B. (2005)

4 6 8
4-6-8

Characters Setting Events

Britney Spears Mall Losing $

Martha Stewart Beach Dancing

Brad Pitt Jail Kayaking

Paris Hilton Movies Party

Park Shopping

Football Game Gambling

Teaching

Boating

r a f t page 70
R.A.F.T.Page 70

Format

Love letter

Friendly letter

Business letter

Rap

Role

Fraction

Teacher

Reporter

Songwriter

Audience

Decimal

Students

Public

Singer

Topic

Explain Relationship

Book Talk

Causes/effects of the current economic situation

Economics

assessment
Assessment
  • Pre-assessment: Determine students’ prior understanding and readiness for the content.
  • Formative Assessment: Tracking students’ progress throughout the learning process as well as giving them the opportunity to track their own growth.
  • Summative Assessment: Making sure they’ve reached the goals that have been set.

Hollas, B. (2005)

slide45
Fisher, D., Frey, N.(2007) Checking for Understanding: Formative Assessment Techniques for Your Classroom. Alexandria, VA. ASCD
slide46

Model for Differentiating Instruction

What criteria do I use to select sources, processes and products?

What do I differentiate?

Sources

Process

Product

Readiness

Interests

Learning Style

What principles guide my planning?

Meaningful tasks

Flexible

Grouping

Ongoing Assessment and Adjustment

slide47

Pre-assess

Instruction/

Formative

Assessment

Remediation/

Enrichment

The Teaching Wheel

Summative Assessment

Data Analysis

think about this
Think About This . . .
  • There are twenty problems on a test.
  • The student misses four of them.
  • What’s his/her score?

Adapted from Marzano, R.

do you need more information
Do You Need More Information?
  • The first 10 are multiple choice, simple recall questions. The student gets them all right.
  • Numbers 11-15 are constructed response, complex questions that were explicitly taught. The student gets them all right.
  • Numbers 16-20 are also constructed response, but they’re application questions that go beyond what was taught. The student misses four of them.
scoring guide
Scoring Guide
  • 4 – In addition to the 3 score, student demonstrates in-depth understanding and applications that go beyond what was taught.
  • 3 – No major errors or omissions regarding the information.
  • 2 – No major errors or omissions regarding the simpler details and processes but major errors or omissions regarding the more complex ideas and processes.
  • 1 – With help, a partial understanding of some of the simpler details and processes and some of the more complex ideas and processes.
  • 0 – Even with help, no understanding or skill demonstrated.

Modified from:

Marzano, R. (2006). Classroom and Assessment and Grading that Work. ASCD. Alexandria, VA

word toss page 82
Assessment

Early Readiness

Student Engagement

Questioning

Flexible Grouping

Tiered Instruction

Tone

RTI

Word TossPage 82

Hollas, B. (2005)

exit cards 87
Exit Cards (87)

Hollas, B. (2005)

a special thank you to
A Special Thank You to:
  • Betty Hollas:

Hollas, B. (2005). Differentiating Instruction in a Whole-Group Setting. Peterborough, NH: Crystal Springs Books

  • Eric Jensen:

www.jlcbrain.com

  • Rich Allen:

http://www.greenlighteducation.net/

  • Dorothy Hall:

www.wfu.edu/fourblocks

  • Phillip Martin

http://www.pppst.com/

  • Ron Leishman

www.toonaday.com