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Exploring Literature: Active Learning. Goal: Teach literature to S4 & S5/6 classes in a more interesting way. Responsibility for learning. Personal response to texts. Reality: S6 repeating course Lack of enthusiasm Few original ideas of their own about texts. Lack of confidence.

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exploring literature active learning
Exploring Literature: Active Learning

Goal:

  • Teach literature to S4 & S5/6 classes in a more interesting way.
  • Responsibility for learning.
  • Personal response to texts.

Reality:

  • S6 repeating course
  • Lack of enthusiasm
  • Few original ideas of their own about texts.
  • Lack of confidence.
exploring literature active learning2
Exploring Literature: Active Learning

Options:

  • Great ideas from Pauleen and others in dept.
  • Melissa Keelan’s Active Learning Presentation.
  • Lesley’s ‘Coaching for Confidence’ GROW model: Goal Reality Options Will.
exploring literature active learning3
Exploring Literature: Active Learning
  • GROW & ‘The Scale Game’ to set GOALS
  • ‘The Jigsaw Task’ to learn the text & develop personal response.
  • ‘Jeremy Kyle Questions’ to revise.
  • Story-boarding the text to revise.
valentine

Valentine

By Carol Ann Duffy

Intermediate 1/2 Unit

the big picture
The Big Picture
  • We will read the poem ‘Valentine’ by Carol Ann Duffy.
  • You will study the poem in groups and teach others in the class what you have learned.
  • We will explore how the poet develops the theme of love using an extended metaphor throughout the poem.
  • We will also study other poetic techniques such as imagery, word choice and structure.

Goal by the end of this unit:

  • To improve your critical writing skills
  • Be able to write an excellent critical essay on ‘Valentine’ including interesting personal response.
current reality
Current Reality
  • How do you feel about achieving this goal?
  • Think about the following for a minute:

What aspects of writing a CEL/preparing for the critical essay exam do you feel confident that you can do well?

Are there any obstacles which might make it difficult for you to achieve this goal successfully?

current reality scale
Current Reality Scale

Rules

  • The right side of the room represents 100% confidence.
  • The left side of the room represents 0% confidence.
  • The middle of the room represents a neutral position (you have some confidence but also doubts).
  • You can stand anywhere across the scale.
  • I will read out various statements.
  • Decide how you feel about each one and position yourself on the ‘scale’.
  • Be honest and notice where others are standing too.
current reality scale8
Current Reality Scale

How confident do you feel about:

  • Your critical writing skills overall?
  • Writing an effective introduction for a critical essay?
  • Writing clear topic sentences?
  • Choosing appropriate quotations for a CEL?
  • Analysing quotations and commenting on techniques?
  • Expressing your own opinion about texts?
  • Writing conclusions?
  • How do you expect you will feel about writing a critical essay by the end of this unit?

Other Scale

Contents

current reality discussion
Current RealityDiscussion
  • What other difficulties or obstacles have you thought of?
  • Time
  • Working at home
  • Absence
  • Getting help
options
Options
  • What can we do to ensure you are able to achieve your goal of writing an excellent critical essay?
  • Option 1: Do nothing! This is always an option, however, it won’t help you to achieve your goal.
  • Option 2: ?
slide11
Will
  • Actively participate in class!
  • Throughout this unit, you will be given various pieces of homework.
  • Plan what you will do and when you will do it.

Contents

context of the poem
Context of the Poem
  • This poem is written in the first person. The speaker appears to be the poet, addressing her lover as "you". In fact, Carol Ann Duffy wrote Valentine after a radio producer asked her to write an original poem for St. Valentine's Day. (Valentine was published in 1993, in the collection Mean Time.) But the poem is universal: it could be from any lover to any beloved (for example, there is no indication of the sex of either the "I" or the "you").
  • The poem, on the surface, is about the giving of an unusual present for St. Valentine's Day, but really is an exploration of love between two people. This is a good text to write about, because it has a single central image, which is developed throughout the poem.
cel task
CEL Task
  • Discuss the effectiveness of Carol Ann Duffy’s use of extended metaphor in the poem ‘Valentine’.

DISCUSS

What are the key words in this task?

What is the question asking you to do?

just imagine
Just Imagine. . .
  • It is Valentine’s Day. There is a special someone you would love to get a card or romantic gift from. You wake up, full of anticipation for the most romantic day of the year. . . .
  • What springs to mind when you think of Valentine gifts and cards?
  • What are you hoping the postman has brought you?
  • Let’s see what the postman has brought you. . .

Discussion:

here s your gift
Here’s your gift. . .

Yes, that’s right; your special person has given you an onion!

Discussion:

What is your initial impression of this gift?

Why do you think they might have given you it?

While reading the poem, think about the speaker’s reasons for giving an onion as a gift.

valentine16
Not a red rose or a satin heart.

I give you an onion.

It is a moon wrapped in brown paper.

It promises light

like the careful undressing of love.

Here.

It will blind you with tears

like a lover.

It will make your reflection

a wobbling photo of grief.

I am trying to be truthful.

Not a cute card or kissogram.

I give you an onion.

Its fierce kiss will stay on your lips,

possessive and faithful

as we are,

for as long as we are.

Take it.

Its platinum loops shrink to a wedding ring,

if you like.

Lethal.

Its scent will cling to your fingers,

cling to your knife.

Valentine

What is the poem about?

jigsaw task
Jigsaw Task
  • Each group will be given one verse of the poem to study.
  • You should write notes on your copy of the poem (this is called ‘annotating a poem’).
  • You should expand these notes by adding more detail in your note book/jotter.
  • You will then teach others in the class about your verse.
why study the poem this way
Why study the poem this way?
  • You have to think for yourself and form your own ideas.
  • Writing about your personal response to a text is an important part of a critical essay.
  • You all have to be actively involved. If you do nothing, it will impact on others.
  • It’s far more interesting than being given line after line of analysis to copy from the board.
slide19

Learning Groups

Teaching Groups

consider the following while studying your verse
Consider the followingwhile studying your verse:
  • Can you identify the extended metaphor? Remember your essay will be about this.
  • What ideas and themes are you aware of?
  • Is there anything note-worthy about the structure of the verse?
  • Are there any interesting words or images in the verse?
  • Any other poetic techniques?
  • You will then be split into different groups and you will have to teach the rest of your group about the verse you have studied.
valentine21
Not a red rose or a satin heart.

I give you an onion.

It is a moon wrapped in brown paper.

It promises light

like the careful undressing of love.

Here.

It will blind you with tears

like a lover.

It will make your reflection

a wobbling photo of grief.

I am trying to be truthful.

Not a cute card or kissogram.

I give you an onion.

Its fierce kiss will stay on your lips,

possessive and faithful

as we are,

for as long as we are.

Take it.

Its platinum loops shrink to a wedding ring,

if you like.

Lethal.

Its scent will cling to your fingers,

cling to your knife.

Valentine

1

3

2

4

How does Duffy feel about Valentine’s gifts and the reality of love?

teach it
Teach It!
  • Now we have completed the Jigsaw Task, you should now understand more about the poem and have developed your ideas about it.
  • Are you confident enough to go over your verse with the class? We need a volunteer for each verse.
  • While our volunteers go over each verse with you, you should make more notes and ask & answer questions.
  • You will be completing some questions for homework to check your understanding.
  • The group with the most marks (altogether) wins!
valentine homework questions
Valentine Homework Questions
  • “Not a red rose or satin heart” What are these traditional symbols of? Why does the speaker choose not to give these? =2
  • Consider the metaphor “it is a moon wrapped in brown paper”

A. Explain your understanding of the idea of the onion as “a moon” =2

B. What is the significance of “brown paper”. =2

  • “Like the careful undressing of love”. Explain the meaning of this line. =2
  • What is the effect of the word “Here”? =1
  • “Blind you with tears like a lover”. In what way is this an effective simile? =2

Contents

slide24
“I am trying to be truthful”. In what way is the speaker trying to tell the truth? What does this suggest about traditional Valentine’s gifts? =2
  • What is the effect of this line standing alone? =2
  • “It’s fierce kiss will stay on your lips”. Why is this line effective? What does this suggest about other Valentine’s gifts? =2
  • “Platinum loops shrink to a wedding ring” If you think about an onion, what could these words be referring to? What else does this represent? =2
  • What does the word “Lethal” suggest about love? Why is this word on it’s own? =2
  • “it’s scent will cling to your fingers” What does the scent of the onion symbolise? What does this suggest about traditional gifts? =2
  • “Cling to your knife” ends the poem. What does this suggest to you? Is it an effective ending? Why/why not? =3
  • Explain why you think the extended metaphor of an onion representing love is effective in each verse of the poem. You should comment on each verse separately and you should quote particularly effective words/phrases or lines. = 4 marks

= 30 marks altogether

Contents

answers
Answers

1) “Not a red rose or satin heart” What are these traditional symbols of? Why does the speaker choose not to give these?

  • Love/romance/Valentine gifts (1)
  • She feels they are clichéd/do not mean anything/do not really represent love (1)

= 2 altogether.

slide26
Consider the metaphor “it is a moon wrapped in brown paper”

A) Explain your understanding of the idea of the onion as “a moon”

  • They are both round (1)
  • and the same colour/bright/light (1)
  • The moon is appropriate as we associate it with romance (1) Moonlit strolls are romantic (1)

= 2 altogether.

  • What is the significance of “brown paper”.
  • It describes the brown ‘cover’/outside of the onion (1).
  • Similar to a present (1)

= 2 altogether.

slide27
“like the careful undressing of love” Explain the meaning of this line.
  • A present/gift can be undressed by taking the paper off (1)
  • Just like the sensual/physical side of love between two adults (1)
  • It’s a simile (1)

= 2 altogether

slide28
What is the effect of the word “Here”?
  • Draws attention to the gesture/offer/command – she is giving the ‘gift’ to her lover. (1)

= 1 altogether.

slide29
“Blind you with tears like a lover” In what way is this an effective simile?
  • “Blind” – can’t see because of tears + comment on effectiveness (1)
  • Love can be painful/hurtful/make you cry + comment on effectiveness (1)
  • “Blind” – can’t see the truth/reality/the bad things – only the good when in love + comment on effectiveness (1)

= 2 altogether.

slide30
“I am trying to be truthful” In what way is the speaker trying to tell the truth? What does this suggest about traditional Valentine’s gifts?
  • Truth about what love is really like (1)
  • that love can cause pain and be difficult (1)
  • Traditional gifts don’t really represent real love/are meaningless (1)
  • = 2 altogether
slide31
What is the effect of this line standing alone?
  • Draws attention (1)
  • so truth is clearly important to the poet (1)
  • = 2 altogether
slide32
“It’s fierce kiss will stay on your lips” Why is this line effective? What does this suggest about other Valentine’s gifts?
  • “Fierce” = danger/threat/passion (1)
  • “Stay on your lips” = love can last and the feelings can stay around even after the relationship is finished (like smell of onion) (1)

= 2 altogether

slide33
“platinum loops shrink to a wedding ring” If you think about an onion, what could these words be referring to? What else does this represent?
  • Loops of onion get smaller the further in you go (1)
  • which could suggest that relationships get deeper and deeper and marriage is at the core (1).
  • OR that “shrink” is negative (1)
  • suggesting that marriage diminishes/ruins/spoils a relationship (1)

= 2 altogether

slide34
What does the word “Lethal” suggest about love? Why is this word on its own?
  • Lethal = danger/can cause pain/wound you/can kill you (1)
  • It’s on its own to draw attention to it (1).

= 2 altogether.

slide35
“it’s scent will cling to your fingers” What does the scent of the onion symbolise? What does this suggest about traditional gifts?
  • Possessive/jealous feelings/feelings that stay around for a long time/even if you don’t want them to (1).
  • Traditional gifts don’t last (1).

= 2 altogether

slide36
“Cling to your knife” ends the poem. What does this suggest to you? Is it an effective ending? Why/why not?
  • “cling” = Possession/jealous feelings/can’t get rid of (1)
  • marriage vows lasting (1).
  • “knife” symbolises danger/hurt/pain /violence/difficult side of relationships (1).
  • Reasonable personal opinions about effectiveness with reason (1)

= 3 altogether

slide37
Explain why you think the extended metaphor of an onion representing love is effective in each verse of the poem. You should comment on each verse separately and you should quote particularly effective words/phrases or lines. = 4 marks

I will mark this one for you.

skimming and scanning
Skimming and Scanning
  • It is your job to skim and scan each of the following slides for any details or notes that you do not have already.
  • Add to your notes.
  • Remember – these are only some points. There are many more valid points to be discovered.
  • You have 3 minutes per slide.
not a red rose or a satin heart not a cute card or kissogram
Not a red rose or a satin heart.&Not a cute card or kissogram.
  • Structure of these lines is significant. Duffy begins with a negative (‘not’) to emphasise that she does not approve of these gifts. She adds impact by repeating this exact structure and by placing them as stand alone lines.
  • She rejects the traditional symbols of love because, to her, they have become meaningless – stereotypical, superficial and insignificant.
  • The onion, on the other hand, has been carefully chosen by the poet as the best and most genuine declaration of her love.
i give you an onion
I give you an onion.
  • An offer. Reader imagines the speaker holding onion out like a present – asking for acceptance.
  • This is repeated in the third verse.
  • In the 2nd and 4th verse, Duffy uses commands “Here”; “Take it.”
  • To further urge the lover to accept the speaker’s gift.
  • Short lines to emphasise the emotional plea.
  • Can almost hear the speaker’s voice as they offer their genuine gift of love;
  • “I am trying to be truthful”.
slide41
It is a moon wrapped in brown paper.

It promises light

like the careful undressing of love.

  • Moon – associations with love (moonlit walks/romance of night-time) – positive.
  • The onion, when unwrapped, reveals a bright, white core – positive.
  • Love also ‘promises’ happiness and joy. It can ‘light’ up a lovers face/ bring joy to their life. The word ‘promise’ suggests that this is not always fulfilled.
  • ‘careful’ – tenderness.
  • ‘undressing’ – sensual side to a romantic relationship (like an onion can be ‘undressed’).
  • Also emphasises different layers to a relationship.
slide42
It will blind you with tears
  • like a lover.
  • It will make your reflection
  • a wobbling photo of grief.
  • ‘Blind you’ – connotations of not seeing things clearly while in love. True love can cause much pain.
  • Imagery – a wobbling photo of grief. Tears can make you look different and literally/metaphorically help you to see things clearly. ‘Photo’ – stays in your memory as a ‘snapshot’.
  • ‘grief’ – highly emotive word choice – great pain – comparable to a death.
its fierce kiss will stay on your lips its scent will cling to your fingers
Its fierce kiss will stay on your lips,&Its scent will cling to your fingers,
  • Powerful love is very difficult to forget, and that just like the pungent scent and taste of a onion, a relationship will remain in the mind of the partners, perhaps even long after it has ended.
  • ‘cling’ and ‘fierce’ – negative connotations of being overly possessive and almost dangerous.
slide44
possessive and faithful

as we are,

for as long as we are.

  • ‘possessive’ – negative connotations – links to the word ‘cling’ later in the poem. Idea that a lover ‘belongs’ to you and only you (‘faithful’).
  • ‘for as long as we are.’ – does this suggest forever or simply the course of the relationship? Realistic view of love as not necessarily lasting forever.
slide45
Its platinum loops shrink to a wedding ring,
  • if you like.
  • Loops of the onion reminds us of the loop of a wedding ring – a symbol for love and commitment.
  • The addition of ‘if you like’ seems to suggest that Duffy does not feel that marriage is necessary – only if both partners want it.
  • ‘shrinks’ is interesting as if something shrinks, it gets less significant and valuable. This perhaps hints at the end of the relationship. Could it mean the relationship becomes deeper?
slide46
Lethal.
  • Its scent will cling to your fingers,
  • cling to your knife.
  • The mention of a knife reminds us of pain and following the word ‘lethal’ has sinister connotations. ‘Lethal’ conveys the intensity of the lovers – perhaps forcing the end of the relationship.
  • Suggests the death of the relationship with one partner ‘cutting’ it (ending it).
  • Can a broken relationship kill part of a person?
  • In what way?
slide47

The Scale Game

Learning Intentions

  • To consider your own experiences of love/Valentine’s Day and your opinions about it.
  • To see how your experiences and opinions compare with others in the class.
  • To promote an interesting discussion on the topic of love and St Valentine’s Day.
slide48

The Scale Game

Rules

  • The right side of the room represents 100% agreement/yes.
  • The left side of the room represents 100% disagreement/no.
  • The middle of the room represents a neutral position (undecided/neither agree or disagree).
  • I will read out various statements.
  • Decide how you feel about each one and position yourself on the ‘scale’.
  • You can stand anywhere across the scale.
  • Be honest!
slide49

The Scale Game

  • I look forward to Valentine’s Day.
  • I value Valentine’s Day.
  • On Valentine’s Day I want to receive a card and/or present from the object of my affection.
  • I would give a card and/or present to the object of my affection on Valentine’s Day.
  • Valentine’s Day represents love and romance which should be valued in our society.
  • Valentine’s Day is just an opportunity for shops to sell tacky cards and gifts and is meaningless.
  • Let’s pause and discuss the views of the class.
slide50

The Scale Game

  • Romance is important.
  • Love is important.
  • Relationships can be perfect.
  • Honesty is very important in a relationship.
  • Marriage is important.
  • Now I understand what the onion represents, I would appreciate it as a gift.

Discussion:

  • What do you think of the views of the class? Has anything surprised you?
  • Where would the narrator/poet stand on the scale for each of the above?

Back

Contents

jeremy kyle questions
Jeremy Kyle Questions

Learning Intentions

  • To develop your knowledge and understanding of the characters.
  • To think about the poem’s themes and ideas.
  • To develop your own personal response to the text which will help you to improve your critical writing.

Contents

jeremy kyle questions52
Jeremy Kyle Questions
  • Jeremy Kyle hosts a chat show where guests discuss/argue about problems in their lives.

Class Discussion:

  • What would the title of the show be?
  • Who would Jeremy have as his guests from the poem?
  • What would their issues be?

Contents

on the jeremy kyle show today porphyria s lover
On the Jeremy Kyle show today:Porphyria’s Lover

It wasn't murder:

She was dying

to be with me forever!

slide54

Jeremy Kyle Questions

Discuss & make notes:

  • What would Jeremy Kyle ask the character(s) if they were on his show?
  • You should base these on your knowledge of the poem. They must be relevant!
  • Once you have decided on the questions, write each of them on a ‘speech bubble’.
  • Writing should be large enough to see from the other side of the room.

Lover:

Why are you here?

Narrator:

How do you feel about. . . .

Contents

slide55

Jeremy Kyle Questions

  • We will stick the questions somewhere visible in the room.
  • In groups discuss each question and how you think the character(s) would answer.
  • Write each answer on a speech bubble.
  • We will then discuss the answers you have come up with and you can add any important ideas to your notes.

Contents

draw the poem
Draw the Poem

Learning Intention

  • This task will make you more aware of imagery and figurative language.
  • It will help you to memorise the poem
  • You can use it to help plan essays.

Contents

draw the poem57
Draw the Poem
  • Your task is to draw the poem in a series of images.
  • This will highlight the key parts of the poem and the imagery it contains.
  • You will also include relevant quotations for each part of the poem you illustrate.
draw the poem58

“Not a red rose or a satin heart”

Draw the Poem

Discuss in groups:

  • What images do you ‘see’ while reading through the poem? How could you represent these in a drawing?
  • You may use as many boxes as you like to represent every image in the poem.
  • Underneath, quote the lines that relate to the image and explain/analyse the quotation (bullet points are fine).

Contents

slide59
Tone
  • The tone is established through the language and structure.
  • It is DIRECT and SINCERE.
  • The poet is making a heart-felt declaration of love to her lover, which begins in a POSITIVE manner but develops a more SINISTER feel as the potential failure of the relationship is considered.
cel task60
CEL Task
  • Discuss the effectiveness of Carol Ann Duffy’s use of extended metaphor in the poem ‘Valentine’.
  • What is this asking you to do?
  • Discuss how love is like an onion and why this is an interesting/thought-provoking comparison throughout the poem.
writing a cel
Writing a CEL
  • As the poem is organised into 4 verses, it makes sense to organise your essay in a similar way.
  • You will be planning your essay in groups and will have to come up with your own topic sentences, quotations, analysis and personal response.
  • It is crucial that you focus on the essay task throughout.
slide62

Critical Essay: Paragraph Formula

  • Point/Topic sentence: Must be relevant to the task and make a clear point about the text (potential, pain, possessiveness, commitment, destruction).
  • Context: Which verse? Introduce the quotation (In verse 1, Duffy describes:)
  • Quotation: Should contain enough to comment on.
    • Indent and leave ablank line before & after longer quotations.
  • Write shorter quotations as part of your sentence. (Duffy’s word choice of “moon” is interesting as. . . .)
  • Explain:
  • Analyse the quotation – explain meaning and techniques used (word choice, imagery, theme, structure, figurative language etc.)
  • Evaluate: How effective is it? Give your own personal response.
extended metaphor
Extended Metaphor
  • The poet compares her love and the relationship to an onion and this image is extended throughout the whole poem, drawing similarities throughout.
  • She compares different aspects of the onion to different aspects of her love.
  • What are the main aspects of love that are compared to an onion? Are these effective comparisons?
extended metaphor64
Extended Metaphor

Positive – words linked with pleasant/enjoyable aspects of love; ‘promises’ also suggests assurance – a guarantee that the relationship will prosper. Love has many layers – deeper emotion may be felt as you peel away the layers. The simile suggests a physical relationship. Word choice of ‘careful’ suggests tenderness/ affection/warmth/ sensitivity. All of above are reasonable suggestions to make.

1

Potential

‘It promises light like the careful undressing of love.’

2

Pain

‘It will blind you with tears

like a lover.’

Simile – truth/honesty – suggests love can cause distress; Word choice suggests pain and grief. Believable – in relationships, one partner can often be cruel/ hurtful.

3

Possessiveness

‘possessive and faithful,’

Strength and power of the relationship – a change in the relationship. ‘possessive’ suggests an element of jealousy, even control – persona’s tone becomes forceful.Many instances in Literature and the Media – therefore convincing argument.

3/4

Commitment

‘Its platinum loops shrink to a wedding-ring,’

The longer a relationship lasts it will become more serious and may lead to marriage – which may become a restrictive relationship. Comparison between the rings of an onion and a wedding ring; platinum – precious metal – wedding rings often made of this; yet ‘shrinks’ may suggest that the relationship may restrict you in some way or is about to end.Believable –marriage is not just about the wedding day – it requires an adjustment to a relationship which may in fact restrict you both emotionally and physically.

4 Destruction

Intense relationship may lead to violence.Word choice has connotations of danger –– violence – even death; the speaker resorts to threat because they realise that their partner is unwilling to accept the gift - aggressive/threatening tone of speaker. Persuaded by Duffy. Sense of killing a relationship.

‘Lethal.’

topic sentences points
Topic Sentences/Points
  • We have identified what point Duffy is making about love in each verse (Potential, Pain, Possessiveness, Commitment and Destruction).
  • The next step is to create a topic sentence for each of these.
  • What makes an effective topic sentence?
slide66

This includes a quotation from the poem. What is the point? What does this comparison suggest about love?

“to start with” – not sophisticated enough. She compares to onion all the way though – not just in this verse.

More effective, although sentence is too long and complicated. Aspect of love identified as ‘hopeful’ which is correct. Mentions a technique.

Aspects of love correctly identified as promising ‘positivity and happiness’ – more detailed. Poet is mentioned = sophisticated.

Have a go at writing a topic sentence for paragraph 1.

slide67

“all about how” – not sophisticated. Not specific enough.

Duffy does not “talk” – she writes/discusses. “A lot” – too informal. Not specific enough.

topic sentences
Topic Sentences
  • Using the next slide to help you, try to write a point/topic sentence for each paragraph.
  • Then choose an appropriate quotation to back up your point.
slide69

Potential

Destruction

P

C

Q

E

P

C

Q

E

Question:

Effectiveness of extended metaphor

Commitment

Pain

P

C

Q

E

P

C

Q

E

Possessiveness

P

C

Q

E

introduction
Introduction
  • Introduction – a useful structure to use when writing an introduction is TAGLT.
  • T – text/title
  • A – author/poet
  • G - genre
  • L – link to task + key points
effectiveness of extended metaphor
Effectiveness of Extended Metaphor
  • T – text A – author G - genre L – Link to task
  • In the poem ‘Valentine’ by Carol Ann Duffy, the poet. . . Uses an ________________ throughout the poem to describe different aspects of love. The poem begins with a _____ tone. Throughout the poem, the tone becomes more _________ as Duffy suggests love can______ . Duffy’s point is__(love/truth)____.
peer marking of essay introduction
Peer Marking of Essay:Introduction
  • Has you partner included the following effectively?
  • Title
  • Author/Poet
  • Genre (poem)
  • Link to task (effectiveness of extended metaphor + sum up some key points)
slide73

Peer Marking of Essay:Paragraphs

  • Point/Topic sentence: Must be relevant to the task and make a clear point about the text (potential, pain, possessiveness, commitment, destruction).
  • Context: Which verse? Introduce the quotation (In verse 1, Duffy describes:)
  • Quotation: Should contain enough to comment on.
    • Indent and leave ablank line before & after longer quotations.
  • Write shorter quotations as part of your sentence. (Duffy’s word choice of “moon” is interesting as. . . .)
  • Explain:
  • Analyse the quotation – explain meaning and techniques used (word choice, imagery, theme, structure, figurative language etc.)
  • Evaluate: How effective is it? Give your own personal response.
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Peer Marking of Essay:Conclusion

  • To conclude/ In conclusion. . . .
  • Summarise each point you made and how it relates to the question.
  • Personal response to each point and the text overall.
  • Evaluate effectiveness and relate this to the task.
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‘In conclusion’ or ‘To conclude’ Carol Ann Duffy’s use of extended metaphor is extremely effective because it helps the reader to understand the truth about what love is really like. She suggests that love can offer potential and hope. . .
  • The poet also helps us see that love can. . . .
  • I feel/in my opinion/I believe/as far as I am concerned. . . .effectiveness
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Potential

Destruction

P

C

Q

E

P

C

Q

E

Question:

Poem that deals with love.

Content & language.

How is my understanding of love deepened?

Commitment

Pain

P

C

Q

E

P

C

Q

E

Possessiveness

P

C

Q

E

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Potential

Destruction

P

C

Q

E

P

C

Q

E

Question:

Choose a poem which has something important to say to you. By referring closely to the poet’s techniques, analyse how the poet successfully conveys the importance of the subject.

Commitment

Pain

P

C

Q

E

P

C

Q

E

Possessiveness

P

C

Q

E

homework task imaginative response
Homework Task:Imaginative Response
  • Putting yourself in the position of a character/narrator is an interesting way to develop your understanding of a text.
  • Imagine that YOU have been inspired to give an onion to your boy/girlfriend /someone you admire for Valentine’s Day.
  • You should write a letter to them, explaining exactly why you wish to give them an onion as a Valentine gift.
structure
Structure
  • You should begin by reassuring the lover of ‘your’ love for them and offer the onion as a gift.
  • Each of the next 4 paragraphs should follow the verses of the poem. In each paragraph, you should explain how an aspect of the onion is similar to an aspect of love.
  • At the end, you should make it clear what your views are about love and the future of ‘your’ relationship.

=

style
Style
  • Your letter should be of a similar tone and convey the same message as the poem.
  • In a letter, you will be able to explain in more detail, all the reasons why an onion is a suitable representation of a relationship.
  • Remember – this is a romantic letter to a loved one so you should reveal ‘your’ thoughts and feelings in a romantic but honest way (in a similar style to Duffy).
example plan
Example & Plan

17 June 2010

Dear ______,

Intro: I have given you an onion for Valentine’s Day because it means so much more than the usual meaningless Valentine’s gifts of corny cards and wilting petrol station carnations. Instead, I’ve given you something that represents true love rather than the so-called ‘love’ you see in a romantic comedy film. I will prove to you that my gift is more real than any other gift I have ever given to you before. Please be assured that it is heart-felt.

P1 - Verse 1 (in own words – no quotes) ROMANCE/MOON

P2 – Verse 2 PAIN/TEARS

P3 – Verse 3 POSSESSIVENESS

P4 – Verse 4 FEELINGS ABOUT MARRIAGE/FURTURE OF RELATIONSHIP.

Conclusion – Sum up why this is such a suitable gift. How would you like loved one to respond/react?

47 Torphin Crescent

Carntyne

Glasgow

G32 6QE