6 3 elastic and inelastic collisions
Download
1 / 23

6.3 Elastic and Inelastic Collisions - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 701 Views
  • Uploaded on

6.3 Elastic and Inelastic Collisions. Date, Section, Pages, etc. Mr. Richter. Agenda. Today: Warm Up Review HW from 7.1 Practice Problems for 7.2 Intro to Collisions (7.3) Tomorrow Conservation of Momentum Lab Thursday: Review HW from 7.2 Finish Collisions (7.3) Friday:

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about ' 6.3 Elastic and Inelastic Collisions' - ave


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
6 3 elastic and inelastic collisions

6.3 Elastic and Inelastic Collisions

Date, Section, Pages, etc.

Mr. Richter


Agenda
Agenda

  • Today:

    • Warm Up

    • Review HW from 7.1

    • Practice Problems for 7.2

    • Intro to Collisions (7.3)

  • Tomorrow

    • Conservation of Momentum Lab

  • Thursday:

    • Review HW from 7.2

    • Finish Collisions (7.3)

  • Friday:

    • Problem Solving Practice

  • Monday:

    • Concepts Review

  • Tuesday

    • Chapter 6 Test


Warm up
Warm-Up:

  • Assume two cars have the same mass and speed going into a collision.

    • Scenario A: Two cars collide with each other but bounce off. Neither of them sustain noticeable damage.

    • Scenario B: Two cars collide with each other and crumple, sticking together after the crash.

  • In which scenario do you think energy is conserved?

  • In which scenario do you think the driver feels more force?


Conservation of momentum
Conservation of Momentum

Practice Problems


Practice problems
Practice Problems

  • Recoil: A boy on a skateboard initially at rest tosses an 8.0 kg jug of water in the forward direction at a speed of 3.0 m/s. If the boy and the skateboard move backward at 0.60 m/s, find the mass of the boy.

  • Collision: p. 234 #39

    • As long as everything is in grams (g) and centimeters per second (cm/s), THERE IS NO NEED TO CONVERT.


Agenda1
Agenda

  • Review HW from 6.2

  • Recap Elastic and Inelastic Collisions

  • Problem Solving with Elastic and Inelastic Collisions

  • Forces in Elastic and Inelastic Collisions


Objectives
Objectives

  • Identify different types of collisions.

  • Calculate change in kinetic energy (or lack thereof) in different types of collisions.

  • Find the final velocity of objects in different types of collisions.

  • Understand the relationship between the type of collision and the force experienced by the object.



Collisions
Collisions

  • Collisions can be categorized into two types:

    • elastic

    • inelastic

  • Elastic collisions are when objects bounce off of each other.

    • (Elastics are like rubber bands, and rubber bounces)

    • Scenario A.

  • Inelastic collisions are when objects stick together after the crash.

    • Scenario B.


Elastic collisions1
Elastic Collisions

  • In perfectly elastic collisions objects:

    • Bounce off each other

    • No loss of energy due to speed (kinetic energy)

    • No change of shape.

  • In real life, there are almost no perfectly elastic collisions.

    • Almost always, some energy is lost to sound or heat in a collision.



Elastic collisions problem solving
Elastic Collisions: Problem Solving

  • Both momentum and kinetic energy are conserved in perfectly elastic collisions. Masses separate afterward.




Inelastic collisions1
Inelastic Collisions

  • In inelastic collisions objects:

    • Stay stuck together

    • Kineticenergy is lost to:

      • Primarily internal energy

      • Heat

      • Sound

    • Objects are deformed (shape is changed.

  • In real life, most collisions are a combination of elastic and inelastic collisions. Objects will deform a little, and separate a little.



Inelastic collisions problem solving
Inelastic Collisions: Problem Solving

  • Only momentum is conserved in inelastic collisions. Kinetic energy is lost. Masses stick together afterward.




Forces in collisions1
Forces in Collisions

  • Assume two objects that have the same mass and the same speed collide with each other.

  • In which type of collision do they experience a greater change in momentum?

    • inelastic (both vehicles stop)

    • elastic (both vehicles stop and reverse direction)

  • Elastic collisions have greater changes in speed, thus the objects experience more force!


Forces in collisions examples
Forces in Collisions: Examples

  • Think of a batter in baseball. Does the baseball experience more force when the batter:

    • bunts (inelastic)

    • hits a home run (elastic)

  • Your car is designed to crumple (inelastic), so that you experience less force.

  • Greater changes in momentum mean more force. Elastic collisions are more forceful!


Wrap up did we meet our objectives
Wrap-Up: Did we meet our objectives?

  • Identify different types of collisions.

  • Calculate change in kinetic energy (or lack thereof) in different types of collisions.

  • Find the final velocity of objects in different types of collisions.

  • Understand the relationship between the type of collision and the force experienced by the object.


Homework
Homework

  • p. 230 #1-5


ad