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Odyssey of the Mind Information Meeting. OVERVIEW. Definition Benefits Participants Competition/Kinds of Problems Sequence Requirements Team Formation 2013-2014 Problems Important Dates Conclusions. WHAT IS OOTM?.

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slide1

Odyssey of the Mind

Information Meeting

overview
OVERVIEW
  • Definition
  • Benefits
  • Participants
  • Competition/Kinds of Problems
  • Sequence
  • Requirements
  • Team Formation
  • 2013-2014 Problems
  • Important Dates
  • Conclusions
what is ootm
WHAT IS OOTM?

An international educational program/competition which provides creative problem solving opportunities for students, K-college

benefits
BENEFITS

Participants learn:

  • Team-building skillsby working in groups
  • How to effectively brainstorm
  • How to identify the real challenge
  • How to seek out-of-the-box solutions
  • How to think on their feet
  • How to present solutions and answers in a large group setting
  • How to “open up” and express themselves
  • How to work independently
participants
PARTICIPANTS

ANY student in grades Kindergarten through college

Division 1: K-5th grade

K- 2 does Primary Problem

Division 2: 6th through 8th grade

Division 3: 9th through 12th grade

Division 4: College students

competition
COMPETITION
  • Preparation begins in September (or earlier if team stays together) for March regional competition
  • Consists of two parts:
    • Long term problem
    • Spontaneous problem
long term problems 5 kinds
LONG TERM PROBLEMS (5 kinds)

Mechanical/Vehicle:

Teams design, build and operate vehicles of various sizes and with various power sources

long term problems
LONG TERM PROBLEMS

Technical Performance:

Teams make innovative contraptions and incorporate artistic elements into their solutions.

long term problems1
LONG TERM PROBLEMS

Classics:

Teams write and perform skit based upon the classical -- from literature to architecture to art.

long term problems2
LONG TERM PROBLEMS

Structure:

Teams design and build structures using only balsa wood and glue which are weight tested.

long term problems3
LONG TERM PROBLEMS

Performance:

Teams present performances that revolve around a specific theme and incorporate required elements.

long term problem guidance
LONG TERM PROBLEM GUIDANCE
  • Places multiple constraints on the team which they must consider as they develop their solution.
  • Examples for performance:
    • Must be done 8 minutes or less
    • Must be done in a presentation area not larger than 7 feet by 10 feet
    • Is judged in many areas
    • Could garner penalty points for a variety of infractions
spontaneous problems
SPONTANEOUS PROBLEMS
  • Verbal
  • Verbal Hands-On
  • Hands-On
sequence
SEQUENCE
  • Parents/students attend orientation (May/June & August/September)
  • Students choose problem/coaches volunteer
  • Teams form/formed
  • Meetings held (September through March)
  • School registers for competition (January)
  • Teams practice/dry run (February-March)
  • Teams compete at Regional level (March)
requirements
REQUIREMENTS
  • School membership fee ($135/first team, $100/addl teams)
  • Coaches
  • Places to meet
  • Funds for long term problem ($125-$145/team)
  • Competition registration fee ($60/team)
  • One Judge and one volunteer from each team(CEUs for teachers)
  • COMMITMENT
    • Students TIME

Hard work Open mind Positive attitude Encouragement

Creativity Punctuality Sense of humor Teamwork Respect

    • Parents

Funds Time Punctuality Planning

< $30/student

to participate

team formation
TEAM FORMATION
  • Teams consist of 5 to 7 members
  • Teams form in many ways throughout US:
    • Gifted (as defined by the school district)
    • Try-out
    • Test
    • Lottery
    • Coaches choose
    • Coaches form
    • Coordinator forms
    • Students form
    • Teachers form
team formation1
TEAM FORMATION

Method is School’s choice

NOTE: Recommend school coordinator not guarantee placement of any student on a team unless that student’s parent or guardian is a coach.

mechanical vehicle
MECHANICAL/VEHICLE
  • Problem 1: Driver's Test
    • Teams will design, build, and drive a vehicle that will travel a course where a student driver attempts to complete tasks in order to pass a driver’s test.
    • Vehicle will travel using one propulsion system and then travel in reverse using a different propulsion system.
    • Vehicle will encounter a directional signal and have a Global Positioning System (GPS) that talks to the driver.
    • Teams will create a theme for the presentation that incorporates the vehicle, a driver’s test, a student, and the talking GPS. 
Cost limit: $145 USD.
technical
TECHNICAL
  • Problem 2: The Not-So-Haunted House
    • Teams will create and present an original performance that includes a "pop-up-style" not-so-haunted "house" where four special effects take place.
      • Intent of the special effects will be to scare others, but they will produce a different result instead.
    • Performance will include at least one character that experiences the special effects and a narrator who relays the experiences to the audience.
    • Performance will also include a surprise ending and special effects will be scored for originality and engineering. 
Cost limit: $145 USD.
classics
CLASSICS
  • Problem 3: It’s How We Rule
    • Teams will re-create a King's Court from history and make their own Royal Court set in an original kingdom at a different time and place.
    • The Historic Court will issue a decree that fits in with its history, while the team-created Royal Court will issue a decree that changes an everyday behavior for the people in the kingdom.
    • The Historic court will be composed as the team wishes, but the original Royal Court will be made up of a leader, a minstrel that performs a song while playing a team-created instrument, and a jester that makes fun of the leader.
    • Performance will include puppets and a Peoplet (a person portrayed as a puppet), and will be scored for humor. 
Cost limit: $125 USD.
structure
STRUCTURE
  • Problem 4: The Stackable Structure (sponsored by NASA)
    • Teams will design and build a structure made up of separate components stacked on top of one another.
      • Structure components will be made of only balsa wood and glue, and will be tested by balancing and supporting weights after they are stacked.
    • Teams will be scored for the number of components they use in their final structure.
      • Before they are stacked, the separate components will be integrated into an artistic representation of Earth.
    • Teams will include the stacking of the components, placement of the weights, and Earth into the theme of its performance. 
Cost limit: $145 USD.
theatrical
THEATRICAL
  • Problem 5: Seeing is Believing
    • Teams will create and present an original performance about a community that feels threatened by something in a location it has never visited.
    • The community townspeople will use a creative method to select one or more Travelers to visit and explore the location.
    • While at the location, a Traveler will use a means of communication to send a message home to convince the community that there is nothing to fear.
    • Performance will also include a narrator character, two rhymes about the travels, and a moving set piece. 
Cost limit: $125 USD.
primary
Primary
  • Primary: The World’s First Art Festival Grades K-2
    • Teams will create and present an original humorous performance about a prehistoric art festival.
      • Festival will include artwork, dance, music, song, and — of course — a team-created audience to experience it all.
    • Teams will also create a backdrop that is a replica of a cave painting.

Cost limit: $125 USD.

important dates
IMPORTANT DATES
  • Problems Released: During first full week in September
  • Coaches’ Training: 16 Nov 13 Mandatory for new coaches (Tuscarora HS)
  • T-shirt Design Submissions: TBD
  • Spontaneous Coaches’ Workshop: 7 Dec 13 (Park View HS)
  • Regional Registration: 6 Dec-6 Jan, with payment via MAIL only
  • T-shirt Orders Due: TBD, with payment via MAIL only
  • Judges’ Training: 8 Feb 14 (Park View HS)
  • Regional Competitions:
    • Region 14 (Catoctin): Saturday, 15 Mar 14 (Tuscarora HS)
    • Region 16 (Dulles): Saturday, 29 Mar 14 (Park View HS)
  • State Competition: Saturday, 26 Apr, Franklin County HS
  • World Competition: May 2014, Iowa State
conclusions
CONCLUSIONS
  • OOTM is an excellent program given benefits realized.
  • An OOTM program is only limited by the number of coaches available.
  • Students who compete are all winners no matter where they place in competition.
origination
ORIGINATION
  • Developed by Dr. Sam Micklus, professor at Rowan University
    • Challenged his students to create vehicles without wheels, mechanical pie throwers and floatation devices to travel across a lake.
    • Evaluated solutions not only on success but on ingenuity applied and risks taken.
    • Students had FUN, word spread and people outside the college “wanted in.”
    • Led to the development of this world-wide creative problem solving competition.
verbal example
VERBAL Example
  • Name things that are “red”
  • Student should think of all of the definitions of “red,” i.e.:
        • an apple
        • a newspaper
        • Ready at the Switch
        • bread and butter
        • red skies at night
        • A map
        • blood
        • ready, set, go
        • Gingerbread
        • Giant redwoods
        • Readiness
verbal hands on example
VERBAL HANDS-ON Example
  • Team is given any number of group of materials/things:

PIECE OF STRING, 2 PENCILS, COFFEE FILTER, MEAT BASTER, 6 PAPER CLIPS,

2 MARBLES, PAPER CUP, PAPER PLATE, 12" SQUARE OF ALUMINUM FOIL,

24" PIECE OF YARN, RULER OR YARDSTICK, NAPKIN (PAPER OR CLOTH),

2 RUBBER BANDS, BUSINESS-SIZE ENVELOPE, 6 MARSHMALLOWS, SHEET OF

PAPER, 3 COTTON BALLS, PLASTIC SPOON, BALLOON, TENNIS BALL,

TOOTHBRUSH, COIN, PLASTIC BAG, HAT, SURGICAL MASK, CLOTHES PIN,

ERASER ETC.

  • Each member chooses three items
  • Team is told items are clues uncovered from a previously unknown civilization
  • Each must describe how those objects may have been used in that civilization’s way of life.
    • Example: Meat baster may have been used to water plants in a greenhouse.
hands on example
HANDS-ON Example
  • Usually the most difficult
  • Each team is given 40 pieces of spaghetti, 15 pieces of elbow macaroni, 25 miniature marshmallows, 10 toothpicks, 4 straws, and 5 adhesive mailing labels, 5 pounds of penny nails and a pint size plastic container.
  • Team has 7 minutes to make a structure and 2 minutes to test it. They may talk during build.
hands on example continued
HANDS-ON Example (continued)
  • Structure is scored on height and strength.
    • Must rest on the surface of the table and may not lean against a wall or be supported by anything else.
  • After completed team must place the container on top of structure.
  • Judges will measure height from the surface of the table to the top of the container.
        • Must be at least 8 inches high to receive score.
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HANDS-ON Example (continued)

  • Once measured team must begin placing weights in container, one at a time.
        • Weight must be held for 3 seconds to count for score.
  • Problem is finished when structure breaks, when all the weights have been used, or when time ends.