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Criminal Psychology. Chapter 3 Psychology & Law Enforcement: Selection, Training, and Evaluation Talbot Kellogg Community College. Who is the Client?. The Police Department The Public Police corruption. Gratuities Playing Favorites Minor Bribes Being “Above” the law Role Malfeasance.

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criminal psychology

Criminal Psychology

Chapter 3

Psychology & Law Enforcement:

Selection, Training, and Evaluation

Talbot

Kellogg Community College

who is the client
Who is the Client?
  • The Police Department
  • The Public
    • Police corruption
police corruption
Gratuities

Playing Favorites

Minor Bribes

Being “Above” the law

Role Malfeasance

Major Bribes

Property Crimes

Criminal Enterprise

Denying Civil Rights

Violent Crimes

Police Corruption
police corruption1
Police Corruption
  • Rodney King - 1991
  • Officer Laurence Powell, Sergeant Stacey Koon, Timothy Wind and Theodore Briseno.
police corruption2
Police Corruption
  • Rodney King - 1991
  • Detroit Police Dept

Once a bastion of disorganization, the Detroit police evidence room has been transformed from a joke to a secure storage outfit that executives are starting to boast about.

  • The evidence room on the first floor of Detroit Police Headquarters became the focus of attention last year when nine people -- including an employee -- were indicted on charges of stealing 223 pounds of cocaine from inside. The department had also announced that as much as $5 million in cash was improperly inventoried and could be missing.
police corruption3
Police Corruption
  • Rodney King - 1991
  • Detroit Police Dept

Once a bastion of disorganization, the Detroit police evidence room has been transformed from a joke to a secure storage outfit that executives are starting to boast about.

  • The evidence room on the first floor of Detroit Police Headquarters became the focus of attention last year when nine people -- including an employee -- were indicted on charges of stealing 223 pounds of cocaine from inside. The department had also announced that as much as $5 million in cash was improperly inventoried and could be missing.
  • Boston Police Department-Roberto Pulido, 41, of Hyde Park, and two other officers, Carlos Pizarro, 36, and Nelson Carrasquillo, 35, both of Dorchester, were arrested July 20 in Miami on a charge of conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute 100 kilograms of cocaine.
  • http://www.boston.com/news/local/massachusetts/articles/2006/08/18/pulido_audio
slide10

Transcript of Boston police Officer Roberto Pulido discussing threats

  • August 18, 2006
  • This transcript was filed in federal court today during a hearing to determine whether Boston police Officers Roberto Pulido and Carlos Pizarro should be held without bail until their trial. The two officers are charged with protecting shiploads of cocaine.
  • Date: May 24, 2006 Time: Approximately 7:48 P.M. Atlantic City, New Jersey
  • Participants: FBI Undercover Employees ("UCE-1) FBI Undercover Employees ("UCI-2") FBI Undercover Employees ("UCE-3") Robert E. Pulido ("Pulido") Cooperating witness (CW)
  • (Conversation Deleted)
  • UCE-1: With you and him, but you do the talking, all right, you tell him, hey, introduce me as Geraldo, Jerry, whatever you want, I just want to make sure they're cool, I'm gonna say 'hey, how you doing, nice to meet you' whatever but as far as you need to tell them 'hey this is a big man's game' I need to know that they know what's going on, because we can't, we cannot have people, but I need, you know, they are going to take it better from you than me, is what I am saying.
slide11

Pulido: Right, right, right

  • UCE-1: And you know, you, you
  • Pulido:: They way I've, I've already explained it (laughing) I think they are going to take it more from you because i've already explained it to them in a way that they understand what they have to lose, and that was the issue with the third badge I told, I told you about. The way I'm presenting this is that yeah you're my family, but as family does, family sticks to their own. And if something goes bad, and they're at fault somebody is going to pay, either with their life, or their children's lives, and as soon as they hear that, they're like, okay, they back off. The only ones that step forward are the ones that I trust.
  • UCE-1: All right, all right.
  • Pulido:: These two stepped forward, the other one was like 'oh wait minute, my children' that was all I needed to hear.
  • UCE-1: Okay, all right.
  • Pulido:: If you don't want to put up your children, then you have to go.
slide12

UCE-1: You know what, tomorrow when we meet them, we'll meet them individually, you, me, Manny, bring them here, you're the man, you're in charge of them, okay, you get them, you take care of them, you're in charge of them, we trust you with that, sit'em down, say 'listen guys, hey you know, this is business, business is business.

  • Pulido:: Uh huh.
  • UCE-1: There's a lot of money involved, the deal is what it is. Something goes wrong, somebody messed up you know.
who is the client1
Who is the Client?
  • The Public
    • Police corruption
    • Police selection
      • Interviews
        • False positives (poor risks who get hired) v. false negatives (those not hired but who would have exhibited appropriate skills).
        • A result of the interviewees desire to portray themselves in a good light.
police selection
Police Selection
  • Psychological Tests
    • MMPI – 2
    • 3 Validity Scales (LFK)
  • Situational Tests
    • Create one.
police training
Police Training
  • The role of the police psychologist
    • Consultant/ Teacher
    • Curriculum Review and Development
    • Fitness-for-Duty Evaluations
    • Specialized training
specialized training
Specialized Training
  • Wellness Training
    • Improving mental and physical wellness through the promotion of healthy behaviors and the prevention of behavioral risk factors.
      • Marital problems
      • Alcohol/ Drug/ Smoking behaviors
      • Recreational activities
      • Surviving Critical Incidents
      • Stress Management - Handout
    • Burnout – A job-related condition of mental, physical and emotional exhaustion.
  • Interviewing the Mentally Ill Individual
  • Response to Domestic Violence
specialized training cont
Specialized Training (cont.)
  • Hostage Negotiations
    • Who does it (Primary Negotiator)?
    • Why?
    • Police Psychologists’ Role?
    • Training Prior to the HT
    • Consult during the HT negotiations
      • Who takes hostages?
        • Political activists
        • Terrorist
        • Criminal/ Prisoner
        • Mentally Disturbed
specialized training cont1
Specialized Training (cont)
  • Why take hostages?
    • To demonstrate to the public a government or organization’s inability to protect.
    • Ensure increased publicity
    • Create civil disconnect
    • To access power (i.e. demand the release of comrades)
  • Other Information
    • Stockholm Syndrome
    • The syndrome is named after the Norrmalmstorg robbery of Kreditbanken at Norrmalmstorg, Stockholm, Sweden, in which the bank robbers held bank employees hostage from August 23 to August 28 in 1973. In this case, the victims became emotionally attached to their victimizers, and even defended their captors after they were freed from their six-day ordeal. The term "Stockholm Syndrome" was coined by the criminologist and psychiatrist Nils Bejerot, who assisted the police during the robbery, and referred to the syndrome in a news broadcast