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Communication - Making and receiving messages Perception & Cognition PowerPoint Presentation
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Communication - Making and receiving messages Perception & Cognition

Communication - Making and receiving messages Perception & Cognition

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Communication - Making and receiving messages Perception & Cognition

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  1. Communication - Making and receiving messages Perception & Cognition Sender/intention responder/receiver Images carry information emotionally and intellectually. When we take pay attention to visual information, we are analyzing it for meaningful content.

  2. . We have considered influences on perception and cognition. We have considered how images can be used to perpetuate stereotyped information or misleading information. Analyzing an image can allow us to understand the intention of the image maker, as well as its potential effect or use. The process starts with a personal review of what is in a composition…

  3. Critics throughout the history of literature have used many methods to analyze the works of others. Perspectives provide some ways of critically analyzing an image. • Before utilizing six perspectives from the work of David Lodge in order to help analyze an image, we should note all the major graphic and content elements within the frame of the picture: • Make an inventory list of everything you see • Notice the compositional elements and lighting • Study the visual cues • Where do you think the picture was made? • What do you think is the purpose of the image?

  4. Aldous Huxley • Brave New World • Inflammation of the Cornea • The Art of Seeing • The Visual Process • Sensing • Selecting • Perceiving • “The More You Know, the More You See” Aldous Huxley

  5. Personal Impact Assessment • What is the picture's story? An isolated moment– a boy resting. • List primary words/images Eagle sculpture, boy, park, resting • List associative words to images Eagle sculpture – American symbol, strong, protecting Boy – African American, comfortable, looking Park – peaceful, lush, quiet, haven for rest Rest – away from chaos • Select most significant associative words Protecting, haven, comfortable • Pair up primary & most significant associative words in your lists Sculpture:protecting, boy: comfortable, park:haven • Relate word pairs with your own feelings/emotions Sculpture:protecting – symbol for America, boy: comfortable – young and needs to feel safe, park:haven – place to relax in public space • Relate any inner, personal symbolism/association Recall the feelings after 9/11 and all the relentless media coverage- and our strengths as a country • Write a brief note concerning personal insights from this process I remember playing as a child in the park with my mother nearby and feeling safe near a large fountain..

  6. Using the Six Perspectives to analyze an image • Historical Perspective • What is the image's place in history? • When do you think the image was made? Recently – the clothing on the boy looks more modern • Is there a specific style that the image imitates? the style reminds of the newer approach to photojournalism – more casual, less formal

  7. Technical Perspective • Consider the process decisions – what was created in the image with the relationship between light, the recording medium used to produce the work and the presentation of the work • How was the image produced? • What techniques were employed? • Is the image of good quality? The values are well distributed so we notice details, such as texture. The boy doesn’t seem concerned or posing – so the photographer was good at getting the shot without bothering him.

  8. Ethical Perspective What are ethical considerations? • Categorical Imperative: unconditional duty – following whatever is set up as rules, without question • Utilitarianism: Greatest good for the greatest number of people • Hedonism: Personal Gain live for today only • Golden Mean: Finding a Compromise • Golden Rule: Do Not Add to Another’s Grief • Veil of Ignorance: Empathy for others – seeing how others may feel

  9. Was the image maker socially responsible? • Has any person's rights been violated? • Is the image maker empathetic with the subject? • Does the visual message cause unjustified harm?

  10. Cultural Perspective • Societal Impact • What is the story and the symbolism involved with the elements in the visual message? • Critical Perspective – final stage • Reasoned, cumulative opinion • What do you think of this image now that you have spent time looking and studying it?

  11. YOUR turn • Make an inventory list of everything you see • Notice the compositional elements and lighting • Study the visual cues • Where do you think the picture was made? • What do you think is the purpose of the image?

  12. What is the picture's story? • List primary words/images • List associative words to images • Select most significant associative words- nouns, adjectives, phrases • Pair up primary & most significant associative words in your lists • Relate word pairs with your own feelings/emotions • Relate any inner, personal symbolism/association • Write a brief note concerning personal insights from this process

  13. Historical Perspective • The image's place in history or importance based on mediums (photography) timeline… • When do you think the image was made? • Is there a specific style that the image imitates?

  14. Was the image maker socially responsible? • Has any person's rights been violated? • Is the picture aesthetically appealing? • Is the image maker empathetic with the subject? • Can all the image choices be justified? • Does the visual message cause unjustified harm?

  15. Cultural Perspective • Societal Impact • What is the story and the symbolism involved with the elements in the visual message? • Critical Perspective – final stage • Reasoned, cumulative opinion • What do you think of this image now that you have spent time looking and studying it?

  16. Yalta Conference, meeting (Feb. 4–11, 1945), at Yalta, Crimea, USSR, of British Prime Minister Winston Churchill, U.S. President Franklin Delano Roosevelt, and Soviet Premier Joseph Stalin. The Yalta conferees confirmed the policy demanding Germany's unconditional surrender. Plans were made for dividing Germany into four zones of occupation (American, British, French, and Soviet) under a unified control commission in Berlin, for war crimes trials, and for a study of the reparations question.