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Course Introduction

Course Introduction

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Course Introduction

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  1. Course Introduction HCDE 518 Winter 2010 With credit to Jake Wobbrock, Dave Hendry, Andy Ko, Jennifer Turns, & Mark Zachry

  2. Was that painful? • How do you know? • Sometimes, painful isn’t so obvious

  3. Bad design is everywhere!

  4. Bad design can have big consequences • Money • $60,000 disappeared • Social issues • Voting

  5. Bad design can have big consequences • Human Lives • Therac-25 Radiation Therapy machine • Air traffic accidents • !!$rhi Iran Air 655 Airbus shot down by USS Vincennes’ missiles (290 dead); Human error plus confusing and incomplete Aegis interface (S 13 4); Commentary on Tom Wicker article on Vincennes and SDI (S 13 4); Aegis user interface changes recommended; altitude, IFF problems (S 14 1); Analysis implicates Aegis displays and crew (Aerospace America, Apr 1989); Discussion of further intrinsic limitations (Matt Jaffe, S 14 5, R 8 74); USS Sides Cmdr David Carlson questions attack on Iranian jet (S 14 6)

  6. But we can try to help • Project Ernestine • NYNEX was going to buy new workstation for their telephone operators • Each second saved per call saves $3M/yr. • Gray and John used CPM-GOMS to model use of new workstation • Discovered it would be 3% slower than original • NYNEX did not buy workstation • Prevented mistake, saved $2M/yr.

  7. Summary • Design is everywhere • Design is hard • Most everything is designed • Much of it poorly • Economic ramifications • Life and death in certain situations

  8. Agenda • Motivation – Bad Interface Designs • Introductions • Instructor, You • Break – 5 mins • Review of Syllabus • Basic Info, Assessment, Assignments, Project, Policies, etc. • What this course is about • Break – 10 mins • IDEO Deep Dive Video & Discussion • What is Design? • Break – 5 mins • Perspectives on Design Videos • Next Class

  9. Introductions - Instructor • Instructor: Julie Kientz (pronounced like “Keentz”) • Assistant Professor in HCDE and iSchool • Ph.D. in Computer Science from Georgia Tech • Research in Human-Computer Interaction • Computing for Healthy Living & Learning (CHiLL) • Personal Interests: Travel, Skiing, Pets (have 1 dog, 2 cats), Volunteering, Reading, Games, Piano

  10. Introductions – You – Design Activity • Invent a control for a smart home of the future by: • Describing your users • Describing your users’ needs • Describing the functions • Sketching its appearance

  11. Design Activity: Process • Design Time (10 minutes) • Work in teams of 2-4 • Define users, needs, and functions • Create a sketch 2. Presentation Time (1 minute each) • My Name is … • My Name is … • This is our control <show sketch> • This control is for … <describe users> • Use this control to … <describe functions>

  12. Design Activity: Reflection Interaction Design – designing interactive products to support the way people communicate and interact in their everyday and working lives in a way that creates an overall positive, engaging, and productive experience

  13. Break – 5 minutes

  14. Syllabus • Basic Info • Assessment • Assignments • Project • Labs • Course Topics

  15. Basic Course Info • Website: • http://courses.washington.edu/hcde518/ • Mailing List: • hcde518a_wi11@u.washington.edu • Readings: • All posted online, but you can buy several of the books for easier reading: Moggridge Buxton

  16. Assessment Grades will be posted via Catalyst’s GradeBook and handed back in class

  17. Participation – 10% • Treat all with respect – be constructive in all discussions • Come to class prepared – read carefully prior to class meetings • Be an active listener – be attentive, be engaged, use in-class technology with discretion • Ask challenging questions • Comment, build on, or clarify others' contributions • Help your classmates use technologies • Post useful or interesting information to the class discussion list • Visit the instructor during office hours to chat, to ask questions, or to give feedback.

  18. Readings – 15% • There is a lot of reading in this course • As graduate students, I assume that you like to read • Readings are all available on course web page • None of the readings are pointless • Reading Reflections • Rn on the schedule • 8 total reflections • About 1-2 pages per response • Pass/fail

  19. Assignments – 15%

  20. Project – 40% • Group project enabling you to apply the lessons learned in class to a real problem • Work in teams of 5 • Topics will be determined week 2 • Class time will be provided for coordinating team efforts

  21. Project Topics • List of ideas will be posted on course website • Includes: • Usability Professionals Association Student Design Competition • Past CHI Student Design Competition Topics • Future of Technology – Designing for the year 2025 • Whatever you’d like!

  22. Project

  23. Team Composition • 5 members from a diverse team • I get to choose teams…. • …but you get some input • Fill out team form • Turn in at the end of class

  24. Sketching Project – 10% • Think about the products and things you use in everyday life • They were all designed by someone! • Designs are rarely perfect the first time • Sketching is an important skill in design • Quantity + Practice increases ability • Sketching is an activity and thought process and way of communicating ideas to others

  25. Sketching Project • In weeks 2-9, sketch at least 3 new ideas for how you might improve everyday interactive objects relating to that week’s theme • Must have at least 24 sketches by the end of the quarter

  26. Sketching Project • Each class in weeks 2-9 bring your sketchbook to class • You will meet in small groups to critique each others’ ideas and take notes • At the end of the quarter, you’ll submit your sketchbook and a short report that reflects on your experience

  27. Themes • Week 2:In the Kitchen – cooking, appliances, eating, food storage, etc. • Week 3:Shopping – finding items, purchasing, money, customer service, etc. • Week 4:Sports and Recreation –sports equipment, outdoor activities, sporting events, etc. • Week 5:Entertainment – movies, video games, television, reading, museums, etc. • Week 6:Travel & Transportation – air and car travel, bus travel, bicycling, etc. • Week 7:Education – class lectures, assignment turn-ins, elementary school, etc. • Week 8:Mobile Interactions – while out and about, driving, walking, etc. • Week 9: Family & Friends – keeping in touch, childcare, eldercare, socializing

  28. A Note about Drawing Skills • Good drawing skills are not required… • Stick figures, scribbles, boxes, lines, and annotations are perfectly acceptable! Quality is not important, only idea and quantity. • However, you can take a drawing class if you want to get better • ASUW Experimental College offers classes: • Drawing for Absolute Beginners

  29. Final Exam – 10% • Finals week – Tuesday, March 15, 6:00-8:00 P.M. • Based on readings • Conducted at home, but timed • Designed to take approximately 2 hours • Should be easy if you keep up with the readings and lecture material

  30. Policies • Academic integrity • Grading • Extensions • Late assignments • Accommodation • Quality of written assignments • Attendance • Food

  31. My Expectations of You • Be here on time • Do the readings before class • Turn in everything on-time • Speak up in class • Turn off cell phones, no texting • No email, IM, web • Respect each other • There are no stupid questions/ideas

  32. What You Can Expect of Me • I will be here on time • Your assignments will be graded in a timely manner • Typically within 1-2 weeks • I will respond to email in a timely manner • Typically within 24 hours • If I don’t know the answer to your question, I will find out • I will treat you as professional colleagues • You will have several chances to evaluate the course

  33. Course Topics • User Centered Design Process • User Research Methods • Conveying User Research • Personas & Scenarios • Sketching • Prototyping • Lo-Fi, Hi-Fi, Narrative • Evaluation • Current Trends & Issues

  34. What this course isn’t • This course isn’t about technology • It isn’t (just) about user interfaces • It isn’t about “user friendly” • It isn’t about programming

  35. What this course is • This course is about engaging users to design the human-computer system • It is about interaction, not interface • It is about user success • “User friendly” isn’t enough • Mantra: “The user is not like me!”

  36. What you will learn • Design • design process • design methods • creating useful and usable things! • Science • conduct usability evaluations • empirical methods, how to handle data • Art • an eye for the good, the bad, and the • what to do about them ugly

  37. Break – 10 minutes

  38. Design Process Intro • IDEO’s Deep Dive Video • Part 1 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ooN05Q030Qo • Part 2 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_7_sZy-kusw • Part 3 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FxO8t9Sonk8

  39. Discussion

  40. lecture – what is design?

  41. What is Design? Creative endeavor • Process of creating or shaping tools or artifacts for direct human use Outputs are things people-centered concerns Processes, methods

  42. Characteristics of Design • Design… • is conscious • keeps human concerns in the center • is a conversation with materials • is creative • is communication • has social implications • is a social activity

  43. Design vs. Engineering • Engineering • Make a mostly-known outcome possible • Construct a sturdy bridge based on specifications • Concerned with what can be done • Reliance on well-established formulae • Humans may or may not be directly “in the loop” • Design • Envision new possibilities, new outcomes • Determine what outcome should result among infinite possibilities • Reliance on process over formulae • Humans are central actors “in the loop”