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The Art of. Negotiating. Brandeis C. Hall VP/Training Radio Advertising Bureau bhall@rab.com (972) 753-6786. Negotiation and the Gender Divide. 2.5 times more women than men said they feel "a great deal of apprehension" about negotiation.

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slide1

The Art of

Negotiating

Brandeis C. Hall

VP/Training

Radio Advertising Bureau

bhall@rab.com

(972) 753-6786

negotiation and the gender divide
Negotiation and the Gender Divide
  • 2.5 times more women than men said they feel "a great deal of apprehension" about negotiation.
  • Men initiate negotiations about four times more often than women.
  • When asked to pick metaphors for negotiations, men picked "winning a ballgame" and a "wrestling match," while women picked "going to the dentist."

- Women Don't Ask: Negotiation and the Gender Divide by Linda Babcock and Sara Laschever.

negotiation and the gender divide1
Negotiation and the Gender Divide
  • Women are more pessimistic about the rewards available, so they come away with less when they do negotiate — on average, 30 percent less than men.
  • 20 percent of women (22 million people) say they never negotiate at all, even though they recognize negotiation as appropriate and even necessary.
  • Women will pay as much as $1,353 to avoid negotiating the price of a car.

- Women Don't Ask: Negotiation and the Gender Divide by Linda Babcock and Sara Laschever.

negotiation and the gender divide strategies going in
Negotiation and the Gender DivideStrategies Going In
  • Know what you want.
    • But have acceptable options.
  • Ask.
    • "More men ask. The women just don't ask."
  • Know the (your) value.
    • Women report salary expectations between 3 and 32 percent lower than those of men for the same jobs; men can earn 13 percent more than women during their first year of full-time work and 32 percent more at their career peaks.
negotiation and the gender divide strategies going in1
Negotiation and the Gender DivideStrategies Going In
  • Assume a win-win attitude from both parties.
    • Both sides want a mutually happy outcome (usually).
  • Respond with questions rather than argue.
  • Join coaching/peer groups or find a mentor.
  • Don’t get emotional.
    • When men get angry during a negotiation, it's seen as strategic - not out of control. When women do, they're often seen as "hysterical."
slide6

Selling/Negotiating Relationships

Selling:

Is the relationship between the buyer and the seller when the seller’s need to sell exceeds the buyer’s need to buy.

Negotiating:

Is the relationship between the buyer and seller when the seller’s need to sell and the buyer’s need to buy are equal.

slide10

The Process

Prepare for negotiation

Address objections

Explore options

Give and take

Close

slide12

Ten Commandments of Negotiation

Negotiate only with those in authority

I

Explore variables

Anything can almost always be made into a variable

II

There hasn’t been a timeframe in history that wasn’t negotiable

“Give and Take”

Never give a concession, trade it … reluctantly

III

Quid Pro Quo (“If I can ___, will you ___?”)

Once you’ve started coming down, it is quite a job to climb up again

slide13

Ten Commandments of Negotiation

Maintain neutrality, especially in the early stages

IV

Appear relaxed and enjoy yourself

Be calm … don’t show your thoughts on your face

Absorb an attack by making notes

If you want time to think, read over notes or make a call

Never make a concession until you have a list of everything the other side intends to negotiate

Lock-down

V

“If I could ___, is there anything else standing in our way of doing business?”

slide14

Ten Commandments of Negotiation

Watch danger phrases

VI

“A few small details …”

“One little point and we’re in business”

“It’s in your best interest …”

“It’s fairer to both sides …”

Communicate carefully

VII

Tell it like it is, saying clearly what you mean

Be courteous and do not rush the other side

slide15

Ten Commandments of Negotiation

Pay Attention

Listen carefully to what and how they say it

VIII

Distinguish between major points and details

Read any documents you are given

Don’t drink – it influences your judgment and speed of thought

When the mission is accomplished, leave

Make the other side feel they made a good deal

IX

Don’t compromise your objectives

If the agreement is not right, walk!

X

slide16

Negotiation Techniques

Big bait

Silence

Crunch (time)

Cherry pick

Deliver garbage

Red herring

Split the difference

Change the pace

Take it or leave it

Escalation

Nibble

Price tag

Flinch

Good cop/Bad cop

checklist of body language signals part 1
A smoker lights up: “I’m relaxed, ready to get down to business.”

Man unbuttons blazer: same signal as “A.”

Fast blinking: “I’m very alert” or “I’m lying” or “I’m discomforted,” etc.

Tilted head, knuckles under chin: “I’m interested.” Head straight and/or chin in heel of the hand: “I’m bored.”

Checklist of Body Language SignalsPart 1
checklist of body language signals part 2
Tug at ear: “I want to hear more.”

Scratching head: “I’m uncomfortable with the discussion.”

Steepling of fingers: “I’m supremely confident.”

Hand on back of neck, or finger

under collar: “I’m annoyed.”

Checklist of Body Language SignalsPart 2
checklist of body language signals part 3
Fiddling with glasses/pipe: “I need more time.”

Object in mouth: “I need more information.”

Eyeglasses taken off, set down on table: “I’m shutting you off.”

Checklist of Body Language SignalsPart 3
slide21

The Art of

Negotiating

Brandeis C. Hall

VP / Alternative Revenue Development

Radio Advertising Bureau

bhall@rab.com

972 753 6786