Greek Furniture: 3,000 – 100 BC - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Greek Furniture: 3,000 – 100 BC

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Greek Furniture: 3,000 – 100 BC
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Greek Furniture: 3,000 – 100 BC

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  1. Greek Furniture: 3,000 – 100 BC Erica Dawn Nelson

  2. Greek Furniture • Ancient Greek furniture was very basic. • Homes tended to have little in the way of furniture. • Couches and stools were the main pieces, along with chests for keeping valuables. • Small tables were also used, mainly to set food on.

  3. Here we see several examples of stools and chairs To the left and above are thrones seen in bas reliefs

  4. Klines • These couches were used as beds, dining chairs, and a place to lounge. • They were the most essential piece of furniture in the ancient Greek home.

  5. Kline and Trapeza Klines were one of the only actual pieces of furniture in Greek homes, and so it is not surprising that they were well decorated. Here we see one of the trapeza tables underneath as well.

  6. Another example of a highly decorated kline and equally decorated trapeza table. This kline also appears to have the same markings and decorations as the previous illustration.

  7. Kline Reconstruction A kline was made of wood or bronze, and was often richly adorned. This is a modern-day reconstruction of what a basic kline may have looked like.

  8. Tables • Called the trapeza or sometimes the trapeze table, this is the most common table to be found in ancient Greek homes. • It is very distinct, having only three legs. • Also, the third leg always seems to face outward, while the two that are together face each of the sides. • They were often lion-footed, but as seen here, not always so.

  9. Stools and Chairs • Aside from couches and tables, there were also stools and chairs. The most notable are seen below.

  10. X-Frame Stools • These seem to be the most common type of stool. • They were meant to be easily folded to put away and unfold for use.

  11. Klismos Chairs • These chairs are most often depicted with women seated in them. • Klismos are very distinct with their outward-bowed legs and curved backs.

  12. Chests • Chests were used primarily to store linens and valuables. • Most other Greek possessions seemed to be hung on the walls instead of stored in furniture.

  13. Furniture Decoration - Meanders • “In Design And Architecture, a 'Meander' is a decorative border constructed from a continuous line, shaped into a repeated motif. • Such a design is also called The Greek Key or Greek Fret.” • “It was the most important symbol in Ancient Greece, symbolizing infinity and unity: most ancient Greek temples incorporate the sign of the meander. • Greek vases, especially during their Geometric Period, were likely the genesis for the widespread use of meanders.”

  14. Sources • http://www.gutenberg.org/files/12254/12254-h/12254-h.htm • http://www.antique-furniture-reproductions.com/Ancient_egyptian_furniture.htm • http://showbed.com/tag/greek/ • http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Grekisk_stol,_Nordisk_familjebok.png • http://www.theatre.ubc.ca/dress_decor/ancient_world_furniture_greece.htm • http://soodiebeasley.blogspot.com/2009/01/klismos-chair-most-popular-chair.html • http://www.richeast.org/htwm/Greek/Furniture.html • http://www.mlahanas.de/Greeks/Furniture/Furniture.htm • http://www.mlahanas.de/Greeks/Furniture/Furniture2.htm • http://reneefinberg.blogspot.com/2008/10/greek-key-is-meander.html