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United States Expansion

United States Expansion

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United States Expansion

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  1. United States Expansion

  2. Another View of Expansion

  3. "Great Triumvirate" Henry Clay"The Great Compromiser” Represented Kentucky WEST Daniel WebsterRepresented Massachusetts NORTH John C. CalhounRepresented South Carolina SOUTH

  4. Situation/Event Background: • In 1819_____Missouri___________________ applied for statehood as a slave state  • At the time, there were __11___ slave states and ___11__ free states  • Admitting Missouri into statehood would disrupt an unspoken agreement in Congress to maintain a balance between free and slave states • In 1820 _____Maine_________________ applied for statehood as a free state • After a great deal of debate and threats of ____secession__________over slavery, Congress finally agreed to a compromise

  5. Situation/Event Background: • Throughout the 1830’s and 1840’s abolitionists and slaveholders alike were petitioning Congress to support their side. They demanded decisions on issues such as the ___slave trade_________________________ in Washington D.C. and the passage of a _fugitive slave act . Additionally, by 1848 the war with ___Mexico_______________ was over  • As a result of the lands gained because of that war, Congress had to decide whether _____Utah and New Mexico_ should be slave or free.

  6. Proposals and Possibilities • Wilmot Proviso: banning slavery in any new territory to be acquired from Mexico, not including Texas, which had been annexed the previous year. Passed by the House but not the Senate. • Extension of the Missouri Compromise Line: Failed attempt to extend the Missouri Compromise line (36°30' parallel north) west to the Pacific allowing the possibility of slavery in most of present-day New Mexico and Arizona, and Southern California. • Popular Sovereignty: Letting each territory decide whether to allow slavery. • "Alabama Platform”: called for no restrictions on slavery in the territories either by the federal government or by territorial governments before statehood. • Two Free States: proposed the entire area become two free states, called California and New Mexico but much larger than the eventual ones. • And others including different lines, various state configurations, altering already accepted state borders (for example, Splitting of Texas to add more southern states).

  7. Henry Clay Daniel Webster Stephen Douglas

  8. Compromise of 1850 • Should Ca. be admitted to the Union as a free state? • What stand should Congress take on the future of slavery in New Mexico and Utah territories? • What, if anything, should be done about slavery in Washington D.C.? • Should Congress pass a strong new fugitive slave law?

  9. Compromise of 1850 • Should Ca. be admitted to the Union as a free state? Yes. It passed the House 150–56. It passed the Senate 34–18. • What stand should Congress take on the future of slavery in New Mexico and Utah territories? The Territory of Utah was organized under the rule of popular sovereignty. It passed the House 97–85. No official record of the Senate vote exists. All the records say is that it was “Resolved, that this bill pass,” with no vote recorded in the Senate Journal. The Territory of New Mexico was organized under the rule of popular sovereignty. It passed the House 108–97. It passed the Senate 30–20. • What, if anything, should be done about slavery in Washington D.C.? The slave trade was abolished (the sale of slaves, not the institution of slavery) in the District of Columbia. • Should Congress pass a strong new fugitive slave law? Yes. A harsher Fugitive Slave Act was passed by the Senate 27–12, and by the House 109–76.

  10. Compromise of 1850