judaism 101 holidays l.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Judaism 101: Holidays PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Judaism 101: Holidays

Loading in 2 Seconds...

  share
play fullscreen
1 / 9
Download Presentation

Judaism 101: Holidays - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

arleen
523 Views
Download Presentation

Judaism 101: Holidays

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Judaism 101: Holidays Celebrating Jewish Heritage Month

  2. When Holidays Begin… • All Jewish holidays begin the evening before the date specified on most calendars. This is because a Jewish "day" begins and ends at sunset, rather than at midnight.

  3. Work on Holidays… • Work is not permitted on Rosh Hashanah, on Yom Kippur, on the first and second days of Sukkot, on Shavu'ot, and the first, second, seventh and eighth days of Passover. • The "work" prohibited on those holidays is the same as that prohibited on Shabbat, except that cooking, baking, transferring fire and carrying, all of which are forbidden on Shabbat, are permitted on holidays. When a holiday occurs on Shabbat, the full Shabbat restrictions are observed. • For observant Jews who work or go to school in the secular gentile world, this can be problematic in some years: if all of the non-working holidays fall on weekdays (as they sometimes do), an observant Jew would need to take 13 days off of work/school just to observe holidays.

  4. Jewish Calendar • Judaism uses a lunar/solar calendar consisting of months that begin at the new moon. Each year has 12 or 13 months, to keep it in sync with the solar year.

  5. Pesach (Passover):April 2-10, 2007 • The name "Pesach" (PAY-sahch) comes from the Hebrew root Peh-Samech-Chet , meaning to pass through, to pass over, to exempt or to spare. It refers to the fact that God "passed over" the houses of the Jews when he was slaying the firstborn of Egypt. In English, the holiday is known as Passover. • During Passover, Jews refrain from eating chometz: anything that contains barley, wheat, rye, oats, and spelt, and is not cooked within 18 minutes after coming in contact with water. No leavening is allowed. This signifies the fact that the Hebrews had no time to let their bread rise as they made a hurried escape from Egypt. • Rules and guidelines may be extremely stringent. Not only must Orthodox Jews not eat these items, but they also must completely remove them and any food that has come in contact with them from their homes. They may throw them away, burn them, or sell them to a non-Jew (they are allowed to buy them back at the end of Passover). Some go through amazingly thorough and labor-intensive cleaning processes to rid their homes of any hint of chometz.

  6. Shavu'ot: May 22-24, 2007 • Shavu'ot, the Festival of Weeks, is the second of the three major festivals with both historical and agricultural significance (the other two are Passover and Sukkot). • Agriculturally, it commemorates the time when the first fruits were harvested and brought to the Temple. Historically, it celebrates the giving of the Torah at Mount Sinai, and is also known as Hag Matan Torateinu (the Festival of the Giving of Our Torah). • It is customary to stay up the entire first night of Shavu'ot and study Torah, then pray as early as possible in the morning. • It is customary to eat a dairy meal at least once during Shavu'ot. • The book of Ruth is read at this time.

  7. Rosh Hashanah:September 12-14, 2007 • Rosh Hashanah is commonly known as the Jewish New Year. • One important similarity between the Jewish New Year and the American one: • Many Americans use the New Year as a time to plan a better life, making "resolutions." Likewise, the Jewish New Year is a time to begin introspection, looking back at the mistakes of the past year and planning the changes to make in the new year. • Much of the day is spent in synagogue, where the regular daily liturgy is somewhat expanded. In fact, there is a special prayer book called the machzor used for Rosh Hashanah because of the extensive liturgical changes for these holidays. • A popular observance during this holiday is eating apples dipped in honey, a symbol of our wish for a sweet new year. • Another popular practice of the holiday is Tashlikh ("casting off"). We walk to flowing water, such as a creek or river, on the afternoon of the first day and empty our pockets into the river, symbolically casting off our sins. Small pieces of bread are commonly put in the pocket to cast off. • The common greeting at this time is L'shanah tovah ("for a good year").

  8. Yom Kippur:September 21-22, 2007 • Yom Kippur is probably the most important holiday of the Jewish year. Many Jews who do not observe any other Jewish custom will refrain from work, fast and/or attend synagogue services on this day. • The name "Yom Kippur" means "Day of Atonement." It is a day set aside to "afflict the soul," to atone for the sins of the past year. • Yom Kippur is a complete Sabbath; no work can be performed on that day. It is well-known that you are supposed to refrain from eating and drinking (even water) on Yom Kippur. • Most of the holiday is spent in the synagogue, in prayer. • In Orthodox synagogues, services begin early in the morning (8 or 9 AM) and continue until about 3 PM. People then usually go home for an afternoon nap and return around 5 or 6 PM for the afternoon and evening services, which continue until nightfall. The services end at nightfall, with the blowing of the tekiah gedolah, a long blast on the shofar. • It is customary to wear white on the holiday, which symbolizes purity and calls to mind the promise that our sins shall be made as white as snow.

  9. Chanukkah: December 4-12, 2007 • Chanukkah, the Jewish festival of rededication, also known as the festival of lights, is an eight day festival. • Chanukkah is not a very important religious holiday. The only religious observance related to the holiday is the lighting of candles. The candles are arranged in a candelabrum called a menorah that holds nine candles: one for each night, plus a shammus (servant) at a different height. • It is traditional to eat fried foods on Chanukkah because of the significance of oil to the holiday. • Gift-giving is not a traditional part of the holiday, but has been added in places where Jews have a lot of contact with Christians, as a way of dealing with our children's jealousy of their Christian friends. The only traditional gift of the holiday is "gelt," small amounts of money. • Another tradition of the holiday is playing dreidel, a gambling game played with a square top. A dreidel is marked with four Hebrew letters: Nun, Gimmel, Heh and Shin. These letters stand for the Hebrew phrase "Nes Gadol Hayah Sham", a great miracle happened there, referring to the miracle of the oil.