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Introduction to Storage Appliance - NAS

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  1. Introduction to Storage Appliance- NAS Prepared by: Deo-Lama Bahadur Modified by: Kok-Lim.Liew

  2. Logistics • Introduction • Schedule (12 June 2009) • Start time – 09:00 • Breaks – 11:15 / 15:30 (15 mins each) • Lunch – 12:30 – 14:30 • Close – 17:00 • Telephone and messages • Food and drinks • Restrooms

  3. Course Objectives • Day1 Introduction Overview of NetApp Overview of Netapp Hardware • Day2 Setup Overview of DataONTAP Basic Administration Basic Networking • At the end of this course, you will be able: • Identify Key Hardware component in a NetApp environment • Identify Key Software component in a NetApp environment

  4. Evolution of Computer Data Storage (1)

  5. Evolution of Computer Data Storage (2) With the evolution of HDD, storage solutions evolves into 3 core enterprise storage architecture • DAS (Direct Attached Storage) • NAS (Network Attached Storage) • SAN (Storage Area Network)

  6. History of NAS • Network-attached storage was introduced with file sharing Novell's NetWare Server in 1983. • In the UNIX world, Sun Microsystems' 1984 release of NFS allowed network servers to share their storage space with networked clients. • Inspired by the success of file servers from Novell, IBM, and Sun, several firms developed dedicated file servers. Auspex Systems was one of the first to develop a dedicated NFS server for use in the UNIX market. • A group of Auspex engineers split away in the early 1990s to create the integrated NetApp filer, which supported both Windows' CIFS and UNIX'es NFS, and had superior scalability and ease of deployment.

  7. StorageNetwork LANor WAN IPor FC The basic information lifecycle view Primary Secondary Tertiary Servers Optical Library Tape Library Heterogeneous Storage FAS Servers Near-line

  8. NetApp Storage Appliance • NetApp storage appliances are designed for data storage. They use a streamlined Data ONTAP operating system, hardware and support tools which operates simply, quickly and reliably.

  9. NetApp Products (1) • Business Continuity • MetroCluster • SnapMirror • Archive and Compliance • SnapLock • Protocols • FC SAN • FCoE SAN • IP SAN (iSCSI) • NFS • CIFS • Storage Systems • FAS6000 Series • FAS3100 Series • FAS2000 Series • NearStore on FAS • NetApp VTL • V-Series • Information Server • Platform OS • Data ONTAP • Data ONTAP 7G • Data ONTAP GX • Features • Snapshot • SyncMirror • FlexVol • RAID-DP • FilerView • FlexShare • Deduplication • HA System Configuration • SnapValidator for Oracle • Additional Capabilities • FlexCache • FlexClone • MultiStore

  10. NetApp Products (2) • Protection SoftwareBackup and Recovery: • Open Systems SnapVault • SnapRestore • SnapVault • Support • SupportEdge Premium • SupportEdge Secure for Government • SupportEdge Standard • e-Support • Security • Decru DataFort • Software • Management Software • Application Suite: • Single Mailbox Recovery • SnapManager for Exchange • SnapManager for Microsoft SharePoint Server • SnapManager for SAP • Database Suite: • SnapManager for Oracle • SnapManager for Microsoft SQL Server • Server Suite: • SnapManager for Virtual Infrastructure • Virtual File Manager • SnapDrive for UNIX • SnapDrive for Windows • Storage Suite: • Operations Manager • File Storage Resource Manager • Protection Manager • Provisioning Manager

  11. Overview of NetApp Hardware

  12. FAS202024TB 40 drives FAS205069TB 104 drives FAS: One scalable architecture • FAS6080 • 1176 TB1176 drives2 • FAS6040 • 840 TB840 drives • FAS3070 • 252 TB504 drives • FAS3050 • 168 TB336 drives • FAS3040 • 126 TB252 drives • FAS3020 • 84 TB168 drives • Capacities reflect hardware raw capacity • Data capacity typically < max hardware raw capacity

  13. Storage System Basic Components NFS / CIFS / FTP / iSCSI over 1/10 GbE FCPover2/4 Gbps FC Controller1 One or moredual-FCAL-attached disk shelves, with FC or ATA drives FCAL: Fibre Channel Arbitrated Loop ATA: Advanced Technology Attachment • One controller is shown,two are typical (active/active)

  14. Hot Swappable components • Hot swappable components and components which can be replaced with power on. • Power Supply • Cooling Unit • Hot spare disks • LCD Panel (depends)

  15. What an active/active configuration is • An active/active configuration is two storage systems (nodes) whose controllers are connected to each other either directly or through switches. • You can configure the active/active pair so that each node in the pair shares access to a common set of disks, subnets, and tape drives, or each node can own its own distinct set of storage. • The nodes are connected to each other through a cluster adapter or an NVRAM adapter.

  16. DS14mk4 Front Front 14 x Fibre Channel disk drives Back Shelf controllers (ESH) DS14mk4 close-up Power supplies w/fans

  17. FAS200 series controller(s): First to be embedded into the disk shelf by itself Embedded controller(s) NFS / CIFS / FTP / iSCSI over 10/100Mb/GbE FCPover2Gbps FC Such “shrunken” controllers are sometimes called“storage controller modules” Start with a DS14mk2 shelf 0, 1, 2, or 3 FCAL-attached disk shelves, with FC or ATA drives

  18. FAS 2000 series

  19. FAS2050: Front View without Bezel Disk LED Storagecontroller LED Up to 20 15kRPM SAS disks HDD filler

  20. FAS2050: Rear View Power Supplies PCIe Expansion Slot Storage controller B (added for active-active configs) 4Gb FC ports Storage controller A (present in all FAS2050 configs)

  21. FAS2050: Storage Controller Module PCIe expansion slot (FC HBA shown) Handle Two 4Gbps FC ports (autosensing for 1, 2 or 4 Gbps operation,target or initiator) Remotemanagement1 GbE port Console port Two 1GbE copper ports

  22. FAS 6000 series

  23. FRONT View of FAS6000 Series Controller 6U LCD panel Cooling fan Even with system power off, LED will keep blinking to identify the failed component

  24. REAR View of FAS6000 Series Controller Additional slots: 5 PCIe and 3 PCI-X, e.g., for 4 Gbps FC connection NVRAM6 Power supplies FRU(Field-replaceable unit) 4XFC (Fib)2 Gbps 4XFC (Fib)2 Gbps 2XGbE Cu NICS 2XGbE Cu NICS 2XGbE Cu NICS Console port RLM

  25. V-Series Formerly called gFiler™

  26. V-Series: The Heterogeneous Solutions • “Opens closed doors” • Applies Data ONTAP’s power to 3rd-party SAN storage arrays to solve a range of business requirements DataONTAP®

  27. Supported SAN Arrays • IBM • HP • Hitachi • Fujitsu • EMC2

  28. FAS205069TB 104 drives FAS202024TB 40 drives V-Series maxima are comparableto the corresponding FAS system • FAS6070 • 504 TB1008 drives • FAS limits number of disks, V-Series limitsnumbers of LUNs from underlying array • System max-capacities from 16 to 504 TB • LUN sizes: 1 to 750GB, but not toexceed system max-capacity • FAS6030 • 420 TB840 drives • FAS3070 • 252 TB504 drives • FAS3050 • 168 TB336 drives • V6070 • 504 TB1008 LUNs • FAS3040 • 126 TB252 drives • FAS3020 • 84 TB168 drives • V6030 • 420 TB840 LUNs V-series versionsof FAS20x0not offered • V3070 • 252 TB504 LUNs • V3050 • 168 TB336 LUNs • V3040 • 126 TB252 LUNs • V3020 • 84 TB168 LUNs • GF270 • 16 TB56 LUNs

  29. V-Series and FAS – are they the same?

  30. Near-Line Storage Systems

  31. StorageNetwork LANor WAN IPor FC What is “near-line?”The information lifecycle view Primary Secondary Tertiary Servers Optical Library Tape Library Heterogeneous Storage FAS Servers Near-line

  32. NearStore® R200 Configurations • Capacities • 500GB 7200 RPM ATA • 2 shelves in minimum system • 336 drives max • 168 TB max with 500 GB drives • Base System • Single controller (the limit) • SAN, NAS* & HTTP protocols • RAID-DP™ • 3-year hardware warranty * SAN implies FCP and iSCSI protocolsNAS Implies NFS and CIFS protocols • Popular Software Options • SnapRestore® • SnapMirror® • SnapVault® • SnapLock® • LockVault™ • MultiStore® • Virtual File Manager™ • Hardware Options • Gigabit Ethernet • 2Gb FC SAN attach (target) • SCSI & FC tape adapters (initiator) • AT-FCX shelves

  33. Disk Technology

  34. NetApp FC Disks

  35. ContemporaryNetApp SATA Disks

  36. NetApp SAS disks(only internal to the FAS2000)

  37. Why Serial-Attached SCSI, and why now? • High performance – equivalent to FC drives • Wider adoption of SAS Standard • SAS has matured – deployed in servers since 2004 • SAS expected to be in the majority by 2012 • Much higher disk density than FC for scalability requirements • Native support for SATA without need for bridging

  38. Are SAS and FC similar? SAS disks same as FC disks – except for drive interface: • Same disk technologies • Same rotational speeds • Same reliability

  39. Disk details on NOW • Maps drives to suppliers • Lists (most) supported shelves

  40. Overview of NetApp ONTAP

  41. NetApp Data ONTAP Network Appliance’s Data ONTAP provides a comprehensive software architecture for it’s storage appliances to ensure that storage management is simplified, and business continuance is maximised. • This architecture contains 3 main elements that work together to provide speed and reliability • Real time mechanism for process execution • WAFL file system containing NVRAM and SnapShots • RAID manager

  42. NetApp DataONTAP Internals This graphic shows how the pieces of the NetApp software architecture fits together.

  43. WAFL (Write Anywhere File Locator) • Data going to the disk has two parts – the data itself and information about the data, commonly referred to as metadata • Most filesystems must write data and metadata at specific location. But WAFL can write metadata and data to the first available location, thus increase performance.

  44. NVRAM operation (1) Client Storage system GbE Dual-attached FC

  45. operation NIC NIC ack + + BATT – NVRAM operation (2) Client Storage system • Operation is now safe in battery-backed RAM • Also in controller’s main memory, from which further processing will take place • Client free to “forget about it” – it’s done! • Purely electronic, memory-to-memory path NVRAM Main memory Mainmemory NIC = network interface card

  46. NIC NIC + + BATT – NVRAM operation (3) Client Storage system • Consequences of operation consume main memory NVRAM Main memory Mainmemory • As many as 10 seconds elapse, during which many other ops arrive (not shown) • Consequences of this and many other ops written to disk • NVRAM is zeroed