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Affinity Group Coalition Planning Project Supported by a generous grant from CPB. Agenda. Overview of Changing Media Environment Potential Implications for Public Television Envisioning our Station’s Future Identifying the “Critical Few”.

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slide1
Affinity Group Coalition

Planning Project

Supported by a generous grant from CPB

agenda
Agenda
  • Overview of Changing Media Environment
  • Potential Implications for Public Television
  • Envisioning our Station’s Future
  • Identifying the “Critical Few”
how consumers use television and video content is changing
HOW CONSUMERS USE TELEVISION AND VIDEO CONTENT – IS CHANGING

2. Find and Evaluate

4. Author

1. Access

3. Experience

1 access content floodgates are open
1. ACCESS: CONTENT FLOODGATES ARE OPEN

Key trends in Accesstechnology

  • More content - through cable and satellite
  • More channels
  • More platforms - for video content
1 access broadband is the backbone
1. ACCESS: BROADBAND IS THE BACKBONE

US household with Broadband Access, 2000-2005

Percent

Source: Knowledge Networks Home Technology Monitor

2 find and evaluate navigation tools are needed and being developed
2. FIND AND EVALUATE: NAVIGATION TOOLS ARE NEEDED – AND BEING DEVELOPED

Key trends in Find and Evaluate technology

  • Interactive Program Guides (IPGs)
  • Peer and expert rating systems
  • “Tagging” - consumers define what they see
2 find and evaluate friends as experts
2. FIND AND EVALUATE: FRIENDS AS EXPERTS

NetFlix Friends updates the now-familiar user review. It allows you to select “reviewers” from a group of your own trusted taste-makers. Many sites offering video clips include evaluation tools like this to increase traffic and site loyalty.

3 experience consumers want and gain control
3. EXPERIENCE: CONSUMERS WANT AND GAIN CONTROL

Key trends in Experience technology

  • Time shifting - Video On Demand (VoD) and Digital Video Recorders (DVRs)
  • Place shifting – Video iPod, Slingbox, etc.
3 experience consumers become programmers
3. EXPERIENCE: CONSUMERS BECOME PROGRAMMERS

Tivo records your favorite shows and makes recommendations based on past selections.

3 experience content available anywhere
3. EXPERIENCE: CONTENT AVAILABLE ANYWHERE

Sling Media’s $250 Slingbox Personal Broadcaster connects your television at home to your computer at work (or anywhere in between) and allows you to change channels and watch TV as if you were at home in front of your TV.

4 create everyone can be an author
4. CREATE: EVERYONE CAN BE AN AUTHOR

Key trends in Create technology

  • Internet provides a distribution platform for anyone’s content
  • Number of “prosumers” (producer + consumer) is growing
4 create its affordable easy
4. CREATE: ITS AFFORDABLE, EASY

For about $5000, a “prosumer” can be fully equipped to shoot and edit HDV compatible programs.

Step 1. Buy a camera ($3800)

Step 2. Buy editing software ($1200)

possible concerns for our station
POSSIBLE CONCERNS FOR OUR STATION
  • Access: Our ability to deliver content may not be as unique as it once was.
  • Find and evaluate: With more content available, our quality offerings run the risk of getting lost in the clutter.
  • Experience: Adapting to new technologies and platforms may require flexibility and rapid innovation.
  • Create: A new generation of innovative producers may bypass traditional media outlets.
stations response to changing environment
STATIONS’ RESPONSE TO CHANGING ENVIRONMENT
  • Develop system wide “station-centric” planning process:
    • With a common language and tools for planning;
    • Introduced and addressed through Affinity Groups.
  • First Step – Scenario Planning:
    • Develop a shared understanding of public television stations’ future.
step one imagining public television s future
STEP ONE:IMAGINING PUBLIC TELEVISION’S FUTURE
  • Scenario Planning Exercise
  • SCENARIOS ARE –
  • A tool for asking “What if...” and planning for a range of possible futures.
  • Provocations that help us see how the future might be different than we have expected or planned for.
  • Stories built around methodically constructed plots.
  • SCENARIOS ARE NOT –
  • Predictions of the future!
scenarios are built from the outside in
Scenarios are built from the outside in

The World

Media Environment

Consumers

Partners

Competitors

Suppliers

Our Station

Major external forces:

Social

Technological

Economic

Political change

Strategies

Staff / Board

Members

Partners

Funders

110 different dynamics distilled into nine key uncertainties
110 different dynamics distilled into nine key uncertainties.

Future Uncertainties for Public Television Stations

Consumer

Bypass

Content Ownership

?

?

Dominant modes of media distribution

Impact of

On-Demand

?

?

Flat Tax / End of Charitable Donations

?

Business

Model

Public acceptance of change at PTV

?

?

?

?

Multi-Ethnicity

Local Partnerships

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Something Other than Geography

Geography

Summary of Critical Uncertainties in Public Television

X-AXIS:Users Want a Media Experience Built Primarily Around…

Geography specific is: The New York Post

A broadcast schedule that works in Baton Rouge but not Boston

A community bulletin board

Geography specific is not: A Chinese language world news program

The New Yorker magazine

The Do-It-Yourself Channel

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Traditional Intermediaries

New Intermediaries

Summary of Critical Uncertainties in Public Television

Y AXIS: Viewers connect to their media choices through…

New Intermediaries include: Aggregation via social networking (e.g. Friendster) or blog site

A service with personalization/customization algorithms (e.g. Netflix, Amazon)

New ways of aggregating old content (e.g. Rotten Tomatoes movie reviews site)

Individuals aggregating their own content

New Intermediaries are not: New companies playing the same role as today’s incumbent aggregators

possible public television environments 2015
Possible Public Television environments - 2015

New Intermediaries Dominate

I.All Media are Local

Content on Diverse Platforms Serves Local Interests

II.A3

Content on Diverse Platforms ServesAnyone, Anytime, Anyplace

Something Other than Geography Matters

Viewers connect to their media choices through…

Geography

Matters

Users Want a Media Experience Primarily Built Around…

IV.Déjà Vu Again

Big Media Brands Dominate, Offer Local Content

III.Rupert’s World

Big Media Brands Dominate, Offer Content for Affinity Interest Groups

Traditional Intermediaries Dominate

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Companies today - a preview of each scenario

New Intermediaries

All Media Are Local

A3

craigslist

Something Other than Geography

Geography

Viewers connect to their media choices through…

Users Want a Media Experience Primarily Built Around…

Déjà Vu Again

Rupert’s World

Traditional Intermediaries

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All Media are Local –Consumers want content that speaks to

their local interests and needs, and they have many options for how and where they get that content. Big brands are hard to maintain.

  • How content is created and distributed:
    • Large number of amateurs and professionals
    • Web-based distribution and aggregation
    • Video devices allow content to be moved from place to place
  • Consumers want:
    • Local information about their immediate geographic
    • community
    • Highly relevant content

Viewers Connect to Media through New Intermediaries

Users Want a Media Experience Primarily Built Around Geography

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Viewers Connect to Media through New Intermediaries

Users Want a Media Experience Primarily Built Around Something Other Than Geography

A3: Anytime, Anyone, Anyplace –A wealth of content is created by a large number of sources and is available to consumers on a large number of platforms. Big brands are hard to maintain.

  • How content is created and distributed:
    • Amateurs become authors
    • Easy web distribution
    • Video devices allow content to be moved from place to place
    • Digital rights regulation outpaced by demand and market trends
  • Consumers want:
    • Content that matches their niche interests
    • Highly relevant information that is easy to find
    • Geographic sensibilities, more important than actual geographic
    • location
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Users Want a Media Experience Primarily Built Around Something Other Than Geography

Rupert’s World –The biggest media brands successfully offer the consumer the illusion of choice and diversity. Big brands control contents’ rights.

  • How content is created and distributed:
    • Small number of major content creators with diversified
    • portfolios
    • Distribution across many platforms to a range of audience
    • niches
  • Consumers want:
    • Content that matches their niche interests
    • Quality content from trusted big brands serving as curators,
    • guides
    • Video on Demand

Viewers Connect to Media through Traditional Intermediaries

slide25
Users Want a Media Experience Primarily Built Around Geography

Déjà Vu Again – The biggest media brands dominate and strive to tailor their offerings to local communities.

  • How content is created and distributed:
    • Limited number of major content creators
    • Content reflects individual communities
    • Major markets diversify their portfolios, control different
    • platforms
  • Consumers want:
    • Information about their immediate geographic community
    • Quality content from trusted big brands
    • National content with a local flavor

Viewers Connect to Media through Traditional Intermediaries

step two imagining our station s future
STEP TWO:IMAGINING OUR STATION’S FUTURE

Station Exercise

  • In reality the future is uncertain. Keeping all four scenarios in mind, what actions should our station take to thrive in 2015?
        • “No Brainers” Makes sense for our station to do in the next

three years in all 4 scenarios.

        • “No Gainers” Makes sense for our station to stop doing in

the next three yearsin all 4 scenarios.

        • “No Regrets” Makes sense for our station to do in one

scenario, but it won’t be a resource burden in

other scenarios.

step two imagining our station s future27
STEP TWO:IMAGINING OUR STATION’S FUTURE

Station Exercise

  • Take the time horizon down to the next three years
          • What critical few things, must and can we do to have the greatest positive impact on our station’s future?
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Affinity Group Coalition

Planning Project

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