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Poetry anthology

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  1. Poetry anthology

  2. Poems I found Limericks 1- There was an Old Man in a Boat by Edward Lear There was an Old Man in a boat, Who said, 'I'm afloat, I'm afloat! When they said, 'No! you ain't!' He was ready to faint, That unhappy Old Man in a boat http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/limerick-there-was-an-old-man-in-a-boat/ 2- A flea and a fly in a flue Were caught, so what could they do? Said the fly, "Let us flee." "Let us fly," said the flea. So they flew through a flaw in the flue.  -Anonymous http://volweb.utk.edu/school/bedford/harrisms/limerick.htm 3-There once was a frog from under a log. He wished to be a hog. So he fell and bumped his head. And he turned all red. That was the frog who lived under the log. by Alisha http://www.edu.pe.ca/stjean/playing%20with%20poetry/MacCormack/limericks.htm

  3. 2-The carts squeak and trundle, the horses whinny, the conscripts go by, eachwith a bow and arrows at his waist. Their fathers, mothers, wives, and childrenrun along beside them to see them off. The Hsien-yang Bridge cannot be seen fordust. They pluck at the men's clothes, stamp their feet, or stand in the wayweeping. The sound of their weeping seems to mount up to the blue sky above. Apasser-by questions the conscripts, and the conscripts reply:``They're always mobilizing now! There are some of us who went north atfifteen to garrison the River and who are still, at forty, being sent to theMilitary Settlements in the west. When we left as lads, the village headman hadto tie our head-cloths for us. We came back white-haired, but still we have togo back for frontier duty! On those frontier posts enough blood has flowed tofill the sea; but the Martial Emperor's dreams of expansion remain unsatisfied.Haven't you heard, sir, in our land of Han, throughout the two hundredprefectures east of the mountains briers and brambles are growing in thousandsof little hamlets; and though many a sturdy wife turns her own hand at thehoeing and ploughing, the crops grow just anywhere, and you can't see where onefield ends and the next begins? And it's even worse for the men from Ch'in.Because they make such good fighters, they are driven about this way and thatlike so many dogs or chickens.``Though you are good enough to ask us, sir, it's not for the likes ofus to complain. But take this winter, now. The Kuan-hsi troops are not beingdemobilized. The District Officers press for the land-tax, but where is it tocome from? I really believe it's a misfortune to have sons. It's actuallybetter to have a daughter. If you have a daughter, you can at least marry heroff to one of the neighbors; but a son is born only to end up lying in thegrass somewhere, dead and unburied. Why look, sir, on the shores of the Kokonorthe bleached bones have lain for many a long year, but no one has ever gatheredthem up. The new ghosts complain and the old ghosts weep, and under the greyand dripping sky the air is full of their baleful twitterings.'' http://famouspoetsandpoems.com/poets/tu_fu/poems/2185.html Ballads 1-Lady and Queen and Mystery manifoldAnd very Regent of the untroubled sky,Whom in a dream St. Hilda did beholdAnd heard a woodland music passing by:You shall receive me when the clouds are highWith evening and the sheep attain the fold.This is the faith that I have held and hold,And this is that in which I mean to die. IISteep are the seas and savaging and coldIn broken waters terrible to try;And vast against the winter night the wold,And harbourless for any sail to lie.But you shall lead me to the lights, and IShall hymn you in a harbour story told.This is the faith that I have held and hold,And this is that in which I mean to die. IIIHelp of the half-defeated, House of gold,Shrine of the Sword, and Tower of Ivory;Splendour apart, supreme and aureoled,The Battler's vision and the World's reply.You shall restore me, O my last Ally,To vengence and the glories of the bold.This is the faith that I have held and hold,And this is that in which I mean to die. • http://famouspoetsandpoems.com/poets/hilaire_belloc/poems/659.html

  4. Ballads 3- In front of the temple of Chu-ko Liang there is an old cypress. Its branchesare like green bronze; its roots like rocks; around its great girth of fortyspans its rimy bark withstands the washing of the rain. Its jet-colored toprises two thousand feet to greet the sky. Prince and statesman have long sincepaid their debt to time; but the tree continues to be cherished among men. Whenthe clouds come, continuous vapors link it with the mists of the long WuGorge; and when the moon appears, the cypress tree shares the chill of theSnowy Mountains' whiteness.I remember a year or so ago, where the road wound east round my BrocadeRiver pavilion, the First Ruler and Chu-ko Liang shared the same shrine. There,too, were towering cypresses, on the ancient plain outside the city. The paint-work of the temple's dark interior gleamed dully through derelict doors andwindows. But this cypress here, though it holds its ground well, clinging withwide-encompassing, snake-like hold, yet, because of its lonely height risinginto the gloom of the sky, meets much of the wind's fierce blast. Nothing butthe power of Divine Providence could have kept it standing for so long; itsstraightness must be the work of the Creator himself! If a great hall hadcollapsed and beams for it were needed, ten thousand oxen might turn theirheads inquiringly to look at such a mountain of a load. But it is alreadymarvel enough to astonish the world, without any need to undergo a craftsman'sembellishing. It has never refused the axe: there is simply no one who couldcarry it away if it were felled. Its bitter heart has not escaped the ants; butthere are always phoenixes roosting in its scented leaves. Men of ambition, andyou who dwell unseen, do not cry out in despair! From of old the really greathas never been found a use for http://famouspoetsandpoems.com/poets/tu_fu/poems/2186.html

  5. Haiku Who came before us ? KLATU BARATA NICTO Were they ancestors ? http://hrsbstaff.ednet.ns.ca/davidc/6c_files/Poem%20pics/haiku_samples.htm Those who came before shall forever be with us, always remembered. http://hrsbstaff.ednet.ns.ca/davidc/6c_files/Poem%20pics/haiku_samples.htm The Rose Donna Brock The red blossom bends and drips its dew to the ground.  Like a tear it falls http://volweb.utk.edu/school/bedford/harrisms/haiku.htm

  6. English sonnets 2- Feel free to love for none but pain and woe, If loving me has brought you only this, For all I lack has found itself made whole, Though all I am brings never happiness.Feel free to scorn or shy away your eye, If seeing darkened memories conflateTo cast stark shame like clouds across the sky; Let old love's pity be as new love's hate.Feel free to have or have no say on me, To come and go as rain may pour or cease; My love, my tears, are yours to use forever; My only thought is thought for yours, to please.And as the regent to the thrall may use: Feel free to reign in any way you choose.http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/font-color-880000-feel-free-english-sonnet-font/ 1- Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate. Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, And summer's lease hath all too short a date. Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines, And often is his gold complexion dimmed; And every fair from fair sometime declines, By chance, or nature's changing course, untrimmed; But thy eternal summer shall not fade, Nor lose possession of that fair thou owest, Nor shall death brag thou wanderest in his shade, When in eternal lines to time thou growest.          So long as men can breathe or eyes can see,          So long lives this, and this gives life to thee http://www.dummies.com/how-to/content/writing-a-sonnet.html 3-Let me not to the marriage of true minds Admit impediments, love is not love Which alters when it alteration finds, Or bends with the remover to remove. O no, it is an ever fixèd mark That looks on tempests and is never shaken; It is the star to every wand'ring bark, Whose worth's unknown although his height be taken. Love's not time's fool, though rosy lips and cheeks Within his bending sickle's compass come, Love alters not with his brief hours and weeks, But bears it out even to the edge of doom: If this be error and upon me proved, I never writ, nor no man ever loved. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sonnet

  7. Italian sonnets 2-"Sonnet LXXI" Who will in fairest book of Nature know How Virtue may best lodged in Beauty be, Let him but learn of Love to read in thee, Stella, those fair lines, which true goodness show. There shall he find all vices' overthrow, Not by rude force, but sweetest sovereignty Of reason, from whose light those night-birds fly; That inward sun in thine eyes shineth so. And not content to be Perfection's heir Thyself, dost strive all minds that way to move, Who mark in thee what is in thee most fair. So while thy beauty draws the heart to love, As fast thy Virtue bends that love to good. http://www.sonnets.org/basicforms.htm  1-"London, 1802" Milton! thou shouldst be living at this hour: England hath need of thee: she is a fen Of stagnant waters: altar, sword, and pen, Fireside, the heroic wealth of hall and bower, Have forfeited their ancient English dower Of inward happiness. We are selfish men; Oh! raise us up, return to us again; And give us manners, virtue, freedom, power. Thy soul was like a Star, and dwelt apart; Thou hadst a voice whose sound was like the sea: Pure as the naked heavens, majestic, free, So didst thou travel on life's common way, In cheerful godliness; and yet thy heart The lowliest duties on herself did lay. http://www.sonnets.org/basicforms.htm 3-"Scorn Not the Sonnet" Scorn not the Sonnet; Critic, you have frowned, Mindless of its just honours; with this key Shakespeare unlocked his heart; the melody Of this small lute gave ease to Petrarch's wound; A thousand times this pipe did Tasso sound; With it Camoens soothed an exile's grief; The Sonnet glittered a gay myrtle leaf Amid the cypress wtih which Dante crowned His visionary brow: a glow-worm lamp, It cheered mild Spenser, called from Faery-land To struggle through dark ways; and when a damp Fell round the path of Milton, in his hand The Thing became a trumpet; whence he blew Soul-animating strains--alas, too few! http://www.sonnets.org/basicforms.htm

  8. Quatrain Quatrain: Tyger! Tyger! burning bright In the forests of the night, What immortal hand or eye Could frame thy fearful symmetry? http://volweb.utk.edu/school/bedford/harrisms/quatrain.htm The mountain frames the sky As a shadow of an eagle flies by. With clouds hanging at its edge A climber proves his courage on its rocky ledge. http://volweb.utk.edu/school/bedford/harrisms/quatrain.htm Music is really active It's always a lot of fun There is no need to run off I'm always up for a dance. http://hrsbstaff.ednet.ns.ca/davidc/6c_files/Poem%20pics/quatrain6c02.htm

  9. Poems I made Ballad: I laughed as my cat fell down the stairs. She looked at me rudely The poor cat must be hurt she looked at me crudely I can see my cat get sad But she was being bad She must be hurt We should call her burt My poor cat that’s sad My cat’s getting fatter Everyday she’s getting bigger She like to chatter She won’t stop Everyday she chatters it makes me want to get ladders So I can climb to the sky But that’d just be a lie My poor cat that chatters People think she’s weird But she’s actually shy She is mostly feared My poor cat Everyone hates my cat But I think it’s because she looks like a bat My poor cat She’s very fat I love my cat Haiku I really like cats Cats like to meow and prr. Cats are very cute. Quatrain: My cat fell down the stairs She then met some weird bears She meowed at my dog But then got lost in fog. Limerick: There once was a man from Rockland Who wanted to go to Greenland He got lost on the way So he got some nice hay That crazy old man from Rockland.

  10. analysis Milton! thou shouldst be living at this hour: England hath need of thee: she is a fen Of stagnant waters: altar, sword, and pen, Fireside, the heroic wealth of hall and bower, Have forfeited their ancient English dower Of inward happiness. We are selfish men; Oh! raise us up, return to us again; And give us manners, virtue, freedom, power. Thy soul was like a Star, and dwelt apart; Thou hadst a voice whose sound was like the sea: Pure as the naked heavens, majestic, free, So didst thou travel on life's common way, In cheerful godliness; and yet thy heart The lowliest duties on herself did lay. http://www.sonnets.org/basicforms.htm explain the central metaphor of the sonnet: There’s no metaphor Poetic device : How he’s comparing the girl to the certain items Response: I think that the poem is about a man talking about a girl & how he’s so selfish & she’s perfect.

  11. Analyse • Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate. Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, And summer's lease hath all too short a date. Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines, And often is his gold complexion dimmed; And every fair from fair sometime declines, By chance, or nature's changing course, untrimmed; But thy eternal summer shall not fade, Nor lose possession of that fair thou owest, Nor shall death brag thou wanderest in his shade, When in eternal lines to time thou growest.          So long as men can breathe or eyes can see,          So long lives this, and this gives life to thee Metaphor: the metaphor is that he’s saying how amazing she is then at the end he’s sort of bashing her. Metaphor posed: it’s posed at the end . How is it resolved: It’s resolved by saying “so long as men can breathe or eyes can see, so long lives this, and this gives life to thee. There’s no poetic device used. My response to the poem is that it’s good but rude towards the girl.