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Cesarean Births. Ashley Gately , Katie Hamerly , Jocelyn Schaffer. What is a C-section?. Major surgery Requires consent Multiple risks involved for both mom and baby. Caesareans by the Numbers. From 1996-2007, the rate increased every year  maxed out at around 34\%

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Presentation Transcript
cesarean births

Cesarean Births

Ashley Gately, Katie Hamerly, Jocelyn Schaffer

what is a c section
What is a C-section?
  • Major surgery
  • Requires consent
  • Multiple risks involved for both mom and baby
caesareans by the numbers
Caesareans by the Numbers
  • From 1996-2007, the rate increased every year  maxed out at around 34%
  • 2010 = first decrease seen in a decade
  • WHO recommends a rate of 15% as ideal
  • 60 minutes  average procedure time
  • 6 weeks  recovery time
social implications
Social Implications
  • Perks of scheduling it
  • Generally accepted, commonplace
  • Positive experiences
ethical implications
Ethical Implications
  • Maternal request
  • Physician convenience
  • Not medically necessary
  • Abuse of authority
  • Cost
legal implications
Legal Implications
  • Malpractice
  • Waivers (consent forms)
  • Case examples
references
References
  • Menacker F, Hamilton BE. Recent trends in cesarean delivery in the United States. NCHS data brief, no 35. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics. 2010.
  • Hamilton BE, Martin JA, Ventura SJ. Births: Preliminary data for 2010. National vital statistics reports; vol 60 no 2. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics. 2011.
  • Althabe F, Belizan JF. Caesarean section: The paradox. The Lancet 2006; 368: 1472-3.
  • Yang Y, Mello M, Subramanian S, Studdert DM. Relationship between malpractice litigation pressure and rates of cesarean section and vaginal birth after cesarean section. Med Care. February 2009; 47(2): 234-242. Doi: 10.1097/MLR.0b013e31818475de.
  • Chervenak FA, McCullough LB. The professional responsibility model of obstetric ethics and cesarean delivery. Best Practice & Research Clinical Obstetrics and Gynaecology. (2012). http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bpogyn.2012.09.001.
  • Lavender T, Hofmeyr GJ, Neilson JP, Kingdon C, Gyte GML. Caesarean section for non-medical reasons at term (review). The Cochrane Library. 2012.
  • Sahlin, M., et al. First-time mothers’ wish for a planned caesarean section---Deeply rooted emotions. Midwifery (2012). http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.midw.2012.02.009.
  • Ehrenthal, D, Jiang, X, Strobino, D. Labor induction and the risk of a cesarean delivery among nulliparious women at term. American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. July 2010
  • Mayo Clinic. C-Section. June 2012. Accessed from: http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/c-section/MY00214.
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