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5.1: Sectionalism from 1820-1850. Follow along in the student packet: “Content students MUST KNOW to be successful on the GHSGT” (pg. 87-89). Missouri Compromise, 1820. Tariffs & the Nullification Crisis. Nullification Crisis. 1828 : Tariff of Abominations Protected Northern industry

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5.1: Sectionalism from 1820-1850


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    1. 5.1: Sectionalism from 1820-1850 • Follow along in the student packet: “Content students MUST KNOW to be successful on the GHSGT” (pg. 87-89)

    2. Missouri Compromise, 1820

    3. Tariffs & the Nullification Crisis

    4. Nullification Crisis • 1828: Tariff of Abominations • Protected Northern industry • Southerners were outraged • 1832: Another high tariff • John C. Calhoun threatened that South Carolina would nullify the tariff • President Andrew Jackson created the Force Bill to make SC pay • 1833: Henry Clay created a lower, “compromise tariff” to end the issue

    5. The Mexican-American War Wilmot Proviso, 1846

    6. Territorial Expansion by 1850 • California • The discovery of gold in California led to a gold rush in 1849

    7. Territorial Expansion by 1850

    8. The Compromise of 1850 CA admitted as a free state Ended the slave trade in Washington DC (but not slavery) A stronger Fugitive Slave Law was created to appease the South Popular sovereignty would decide slavery in Utah & New Mexico

    9. Key Abolitionists Harriet Tubman led the Underground Railroad William Lloyd Garrison, editor of the newspaper The Liberator, fought to abolish slavery. Frederick Douglass was a former slave who fought to abolish slavery

    10. 32 9 Who published The Liberator and believed in the immediate and complete abolition of slavery? • The Grimke sisters • William Lloyd Garrison • Harriet Tubman • Frederick Douglas • Harriet Beecher Stowe 10

    11. 32 10 This person was a former slave who learned to read and write and lectured on the evils of slavery? • The Grimke sisters • Martin Van Buren • Harriet Tubman • Frederick Douglas • Harriet Beecher Stowe 10

    12. 32 10 The Missouri Compromise did all of the following EXCEPT • Maine became a free state • Missouri became a slave state • Opened all the territories to slavery • Preserved the balance of free and slave states 10

    13. 32 10 The Compromise of 1850 did all of the following EXCEPT • California became a free state • New Mexico became a slave state • Introduced the concept of “popular sovereignty” • Preserved the balance of free and slave states 10

    14. 32 10 According to popular sovereignty, the question of whether or not slavery would be allowed in a territory would be decided by • Residents of the territory • The Senate • The House of Representatives • The President 10

    15. 32 10 John C. Calhoun believed that state governments had a right to declare federal laws unconstitutional because • States were elected by the people. • States spoke more directly to the people. • States had created the national government. • States existed before the National government. 10

    16. 32 10 Jackson did not accept “nullification” because he believed it • threatened the federal government’s power and authority • gave Congress too much power over the states • took away powers from the state governments • made the federal government too powerful 10

    17. 32 10 President Polk wanted Mexico to take military action against the U.S. in the 1840’s because • Mexico would have to buy their gunpowder from the U.S. • Mexico wouldn’t accept U.S. offer to buy land. • Mexico wouldn’t enter the Industrial Revolution. • Polk thought the U.S. was better at defense than offense. 10

    18. 32 10 Polk used this as grounds for declaring war against Mexico • Nonpayment of debts • Declaration of the border • Attack on General Zachary Taylor’s forces • Annexation of Texas 10

    19. 32 10 The Wilmot Proviso proposed that slavery should be banned from • California only • All the territories won from Mexico • The entire nation • The District of Columbia 10