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College of Education Faculty Motivators and Barriers in Grant Writing by: Dr. Valerie C. Bryan Patrick R. Walden PowerPoint Presentation
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Presentation Transcript
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The purpose of this investigation was to identify contributing College of Education (COE) faculty perceptions of motivators and barriers to grant writing at a public university in Southeast Florida, compare this university’s COE faculty perceptions to previously published survey results of Colleges of Education at Research I institutions and compare Tenured and Non-Tenured faculty’s responses.

College of Education Faculty Motivators and Barriers in Grant Writingby: Dr. Valerie C. Bryan Patrick R. Walden

research questions
Research Questions
  • Five research questions guided this study.
  • (1) Which grant writing motivators are perceived important to this faculty?
  • (2) Which grant writing barriers are perceived as important to this faculty?
  • (3) Is there a difference in Tenured and Non-Tenured faculty in perceived importance of grant writing motivators?
  • (4) Is there a difference in Tenured and Non-Tenured faculty in perceived importance of barriers to grant writing?
  • (5) Are these survey findings similar to Boyer & Cockriel’s (1998) findings?
methods
Methods

The survey instrument was adapted from the instrument created by Boyer and Cockriel (1998). The survey included 15 motivators and 15 barriers to grant writing and required that participants rate the perceived importance of each motivator and barrier as “Very Important”, “Moderately Important”, “Marginally Important”, and “Not Important”.

  • The adapted survey was created with Websurveyor software provided by Websurveyor Corporation’s education gift.
  • The 131-member COE faculty was solicited via fau.edu email addresses to participate.
  • Participant responses were coded numerically and a one-way ANOVA was performed to compare group means.
results demographics
Results: Demographics
  • Thirty-five faculty members (26.7%) elected to completed the online survey through self-election.
  • Of the respondents, 15 were male (42.9%) and 20 were female.
  • Fourteen of the faculty (40%) were Non-Tenured and 21 were Tenured.
  • The faculty’s rank was mostly Associate Professor (15 or 42.9%), then Professor (9 or 25.7%), other (6 or 17.1%) and Assistant Professor (5 or 14.3%).
results motivators 1 which grant writing motivators are perceived important to this faculty
Results: Motivators(1) Which grant writing motivators are perceived important to this faculty?
  • Motivators were determined by a mean score of 2 or greater for both Tenured and Non-Tenured groups (what was perceived as important for all faculty)- 7 motivators identified
  • Opportunity to probe or research new information; (Mean = 2.61 on 3-point scale of importance for both Tenured and Non-Tenured faculty)
  • Personnel support such as graduate assistants and clerical help when proposals are funded; (Mean = 2.59 on 3-point scale of importance for both Tenured and Non-Tenured faculty)
  • Having travel money available for conferences; (Mean 2.26 on 3-point scale of importance for both Tenured and Non-Tenured faculty)
results motivators continued
Results: Motivators Continued
  • Building my professional reputation as a capable researcher. (Mean = 2.26 on 3-point scale of importance for both Tenured and Non-Tenured faculty)
  • Personnel support such as graduate assistants and clerical help when preparing proposals; (Mean = 2.21 on 3-point scale of importance for both Tenured and Non-Tenured faculty)
  • More flexibility in how time is allocated; (Mean = 2.12 on 3-point scale of importance for both Tenured and Non-Tenured faculty)
  • Assistance in grant proposal preparation; and (Mean = 2.11 on 3-point scale of importance for both Tenured and Non-Tenured faculty).
results barriers 2 which grant writing barriers are perceived as important to this faculty
Results: Barriers(2) Which grant writing barriers are perceived as important to this faculty?
  • Barriers were determined by a mean score of 2 or greater for both Tenured and Non-Tenured groups (what was perceived as important for all faculty)- 1 barrier identified
  • Inadequate support available to submit proposals in a timely manner; (Mean = 2.18 on 3-point scale of importance for both Tenured and Non-Tenured faculty).
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Results: Tenured vs. Non-Tenured: Motivators(3) Is there a difference in Tenured and Non-Tenured faculty in perceived importance of grant writing motivators?

  • There was no significant difference between Tenured and Non-Tenured Faculty regarding motivators for Grant Writing
slide9

Results: Tenured vs. Non-Tenured: Barriers(4) Is there a difference in Tenured and Non-Tenured faculty in perceived importance of barriers to grant writing?

  • One statistically significant difference (p<.05) was found between Tenured and Non-Tenured faculty for heavy teaching load as a barrier to grant writing.
  • Tenured faculty at this university found this barrier significantly more important than Non-Tenured faculty.
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Results: Boyer & Cockriel (1998) Comparison(5) Are these survey findings similar to Boyer & Cockriel’s (1998) findings?
  • In both Boyer & Cockriel’s and in this survey, findings suggested that building a professional reputation as a capable researcher was of significant importance to faculty, both Tenured and Non-Tenured (Mean = 2.26 on 3-point scale of importance for both Tenured and Non-Tenured faculty).
  • No other similarity was found.
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RecommendationsBased on this study and review of the literature, the following recommendations to increase the grant writing activities within this COE have emerged:

  • Provide campus-wide system for administering grants (grant writing assistance, budgeting assistance, clerical aid for completing procedural functions such as obtaining signatures, etc.);
recommendations continued
Recommendations Continued
  • Provide incentives for grant writing (travel funds, new flexibility in assignments, recognition, graduate assistants, professional development opportunities, etc.);
  • Provide instruction to enhance grant writing;
  • Include grant writing as part of criteria for tenure and promotion;
recommendations continued1
Recommendations Continued
  • Include grant procurement of various levels as significant scholarly work for promotion for Tenured faculty;
  • Create a new formula for teaching, service, and research that allows time for grant writing skill development and grant procurement.
references
References
  • Banta, M., Brewer, R., Hansen, A., Heng-Yu, K, Pacheco, K., Powers, R. et al. (2004). An innovative program for cultivating grant writing skills in new faculty members. (Case Study). Journal of Research Administration, 35.1, 17-28.
  • Boyer, P. & Cockriel, I. (1998). Factors influencing grant writing: Perceptions of tenured and nontenured faculty. SRA Journal, 29(Spring), 61-68.
  • Campbell, W.E. (1998). Writing proposals with faculty: A strategy for increasing external funding at small undergraduate teaching institutions. SRA Journal, 30(Fall), 63-68.
  • Sterner, A. (1999). Faculty attitudes toward involvement in grant-related activities at a predominantly undergraduate institution (PUI). SRA Journal, 31(Winter/Spring), 5-21.