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Huntington County Community School Corporation’s Professional Development Model

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  1. Huntington County Community School Corporation’s Professional Development Model Building Equity & Longevityin Huntington County Community Schools Schools Exceeding Expectations ConferenceApril 21-24, 2010

  2. “Catch Me” If You Can • Your brain remembers and retrieves short bits of information which is why companies all over the world use catch phrases or slogans to help you remember their products. An example is Nike’s, “Just Do It”. • Think about yourself professionally and/or personally and write a 3-5 word catch phrase that fits/describes you. • Introduce yourself to the group by telling us your name, where you are from, and your catch phrase.

  3. HCCSC Demographics • 6,074 students in grades Pre-Kindergarten-12 • seven K-5 elementary schools • one K-8 school • two 6-8 middle schools • one high school • Approximately 375 full-time teachers, 12 District Administrators, 20 Principals/Assistant Principals, 3 Professional Development Coordinators • 95% Caucasian, 3% Multiracial, 1% Hispanic, 1% Native American; 36% Free/Reduced Lunch

  4. “Never before has the pressure been so high to find ways to support successful teaching and learning through effective professional development.” -Salpeter, 2003-

  5. HCCSC’s PD History • Professional Development Past Efforts: • District professional development using a Train-the-Trainer Model within buildings • Annual Model Teaching Week each summer for Susan Kovalik’s ITI/HET Model • Training sessions with various consultants at the individual building level • Development of three district level positions for professional development • Two Literacy Coordinators (1 coordinator/100 teachers) • One Technology Integration Specialist (1 specialist/400 teachers)

  6. Hurdles to Professional Development What are some of the hurdles that you face in terms of professional development in your district?

  7. HCCSC’s PD History • Professional Development Hurdles • Inconsistency of trainings across the district • Amount of professional development expenditures with limited accountability • Lack of significant progress towards AYP • Coordinator to Teacher Ratio • Lack of relationship and connection with students when modeling a lesson • Consistency throughout the corporation of teachers participating in ongoing professional development

  8. “The best way to get a good idea is to get lots of ideas.” -Linus Pauling-

  9. Guiding Principles of HCCSC Professional Development Model • Teachers can change a behavior or practice when they SEE what the new behavior or practice LOOKS like in a real world setting multiple times. • For professional development to truly be effective and sustained, it must be accompanied with on-going COACHING in a non-threatening environment.

  10. HCCSC’s PD Model • Professional Development Model is a cycle - Professional DevelopmentTraining & Observations Implementation with Coaching Individual Goal Setting

  11. HCCSC’s PD Model Goal: To develop a professional development model that would: • Create a situation where teachers observe best practice strategies at anytime throughout the year. • Provide continuous support from professional development coordinators with ongoing coaching. • Support teachers in setting individual, specific goals for implementation of best practice strategies.

  12. Funding the Model • Combination of Funds: • General Fund • Title II-A Professional Development Funds • Title I Professional Development Funds • Special Education Professional Development Funds • School Improvement Funds

  13. Idea to Action • Getting the Model in Place: • Create a plan at the Spring Summit, April 2007 • Generate HCCSC support • Central Office • Teacher’s Association • School Board • Restructure three current professional developmentpositions • Hire an additional Professional Development Coordinator • Plan Professional Development opportunities • Create two demonstration classrooms

  14. Overview of the HCCSC Professional Development Model • Comprehensive training modules for ALL Pre-K - Grade 5 teachers • Training modules include: • Choice • Observations • Training & coaching on strategies • Goal setting • Adequate time for implementation • Reflection on goals

  15. Structure of PD Modules for Teachers • Week One: • Meet with Professional Development Coordinator to choose training option from a menu of choices • Week Two: • Half-day training session which includes observation in the demonstration classroom • Week Three: • Meet with Professional Development Coordinator to create a goal and implementation plan that reflects training session • Weeks Four : • Additional support from Professional Development Coordinator • Weeks Five – Eight: • Implement and reflect on plan to accomplish goal

  16. Options for Modules • Teachers choose from a menu of professional development options including: • Highly Effective Teaching Model components • Comprehensive Literacy Framework • Best Practices in Math Instruction • Technology Integration • Using Assessment Data to Drive Instruction • Curriculum Mapping • RTI Implementation

  17. Two Demonstration Classrooms Eight Schools Andrews Elem. PrimaryDemonstration Classroom Flint Springs Elem. Horace Mann Elem. Lancaster Elem. Lincoln Elem. IntermediateDemonstration Classroom Northwest Elem. Roanoke Elem. Salamonie Elem. Structure of the Model 2007-2009 Four PD Coordinators Grades PK-2 Coordinator A Grades PK-2 Coordinator B Grades 3-5 Coordinator CGrades 3-5 Coordinator D

  18. PD Coordinators PD/CoachingCoordinator BCoordinator D Module Structure - Weeks 1-4 Demonstration Classroom Assigned Schools Andrews Elem. Flint Springs Elem. Primary Demonstration Classroom taught byPD Coordinator A Horace Mann Elem. Lancaster Elem. Lincoln Elem. Northwest Elem. Intermediate Demonstration Classroom taught by PD Coordinator C Roanoke Elem. Salamonie Elem.

  19. PD Coordinators PD/CoachingCoordinator ACoordinator C Module Structure - Weeks 5-8 Demonstration Classroom Assigned Schools Andrews Elem. Flint Springs Elem. Primary Demonstration Classroom taught by PD Coordinator B Horace Mann Elem. Lancaster Elem. Lincoln Elem. Northwest Elem. Intermediate Demonstration Classroom taught by PD Coordinator D Roanoke Elem. Salamonie Elem.

  20. Mrs. Aschliman listens to students during a 4th Grade Demonstration Classroom Celebration of Learning. Mrs. Moore conducts a PD session with a group of teachers.

  21. Eight Schools Andrews Elem. Flint Springs Elem. Horace Mann Elem. Lancaster Elem. Lincoln Elem. Northwest Elem. Roanoke Elem. Salamonie Elem. Sustainability of the Model 2009-2010 Three PD Coordinators One Demonstration Classroom Utilize primary classrooms throughout the district for observations Grades PK-2 Coordinator Grades 3-5 Coordinator AGrades 3-5 Coordinator B IntermediateDemonstration Classroom

  22. Teacher Benefits of the Model • Better preparation to implement strategies in classroom. • More one-on-one support & instruction with less time out of the classroom. • Current coordinator/teacher ratio: 1:38 for all initiatives • Receive consistent professional development training and coaching at least 4 times a year • Training is differentiated to meet each teacher’s needs • Support available to administrators to continue development & understanding of strategies

  23. Benefits of the Model for Students • At the onset of the model, approximately 50 students received direct instruction utilizing brain research and best-practice strategies on a daily basis. • The number of students receiving this type of instruction grows exponentially as teachers implement strategies from professional development trainings in their classroom.

  24. “I love the opportunity to choose what I need professionally to benefit my students. It gives me the chance to challenge myself and continue my growth as a teacher. I observed a math workshop lesson, and it changed the way I teach and implement math skills. Now it’s an everyday occurrence, and the kids love it.” - HCCSC Teacher-

  25. Teacher Survey Data • 97% of teachers agreed that following coaching opportunities and observations, they have a level of understanding to begin implementing the professional goal. • Of 122 teachers surveyed, 100% agreed that they are able to select a measurable goal that reflects the needs of students, professional development, and supports HCCSC District requirements.

  26. “I appreciate the support on implementing district initiatives. The professional development in the past two years has been very helpful because it was differentiated to address my specific needs and gave me choices on the areas I feel I need to improve. Giving teachers choice and support in an areas they choose helps them take ownership and implement what they’ve learned. -HCCSC Teacher- http://www.bestwayout.com/

  27. Contact Information • Charles Grable HCCSC Assistant Superintendent for Curriculum and Instructioncgrable@hccsc.k12.in.us • Kari George HCCSC Grades 3-5 Professional Development Coordinator kgeorge@hccsc.k12.in.us • Janette Moore HCCSC Grades K-2 Professional Development Coordinatorjmoore@hccsc.k12.in.us