slide1 n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Revising Southern Sierran Forest Management: The Implications for Plants PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Revising Southern Sierran Forest Management: The Implications for Plants

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 18

Revising Southern Sierran Forest Management: The Implications for Plants - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 83 Views
  • Uploaded on

Revising Southern Sierran Forest Management: The Implications for Plants. 1899. 1961. 1994. Upper Yosemite Valley from Colombia Point. Malcolm North, USFS Sierra Nevada Research Center, and Dept of Plant Sciences, UC Davis mpnorth@ucdavis.edu 530-754-7398. Outline:.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Revising Southern Sierran Forest Management: The Implications for Plants' - anoki


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
slide1

Revising Southern Sierran Forest Management: The Implications for Plants

1899

1961

1994

Upper Yosemite Valley from Colombia Point

Malcolm North, USFS Sierra Nevada Research Center, and

Dept of Plant Sciences, UC Davis

mpnorth@ucdavis.edu 530-754-7398

slide2

Outline:

  • Some of the lessons from the Teakettle Experiment
  • The current stalemate in Sierran Forest Management
  • The proposed “Ecosystem Management Strategy for the Southern Sierra”
  • What are the implications for plants?
slide3

Restoration and Forest ‘Health’

1996

Sierra Nevada Ecosystem Project:

Critical Findings

“Although silvicultural treatments can mimic the effects of fire on structural patterns of woody vegetation, virtually no data exist on the ability to mimic ecological functions of natural fire.”

2003

Healthy Forests Restoration Act:

"In carrying out a covered project, the Secretary shall fully maintain, or contribute toward the restoration of the structure and composition of old growth stands according to the pre-fire suppression old growthconditions”

What are the best means of restoring forest ecosystems?

Fire? Thinning? Both?

And if a forest is thinned, what kind of prescription?

slide4

1) Teakettle Experiment’s

location, design, and integrated sampling scheme

Each plot is 200 by 200 m

Total plots = 18

slide5

Conceptual model used in the Teakettle Experiment

Results presented in 38 peer reviewed publications (Dec. 2007)

slide6

How do thinning, fire and their interaction affect the ecosystem processes/health?

Thin Only

slide7

How do thinning, fire and their interaction affect the ecosystem processes/health?

Fire Only

slide8

How do thinning, fire and their interaction affect the ecosystem processes/health?

Thin and Burn

slide9

Forest Understory

Present Forest Conditions (Pre-Treatment):

Water most important to herb cover and richness

Indirect light and dry soil most important for shrubs

slide11

What is the most effective restoration for the forest and

its plant community?

  • Get low-intensity fire back into the forest. Fire is essential. Thinning is a tool that should serve fire by increasing its extent and ‘work’.
  • Reduce stem density and moisture stress. Currently plant diversity and many ecosystem processes are severely restricted by limited soil moisture
  • Reduce litter and slash because it stalls most ecosystem processes and significantly reduces understory cover and richness.
  • Provide for more large trees. Current forest, even old growth, has fewer large trees than under active-fire conditions.
slide12

Many fuels treatment projects are stalled or take a long time to implement. Why?

  • Some of the road blocks:
  • Concerns over thinning intermediate (20-30”) size trees? Does it affect fire behavior?
  • Concerns over the impact of management practices on the Pacific Fisher
  • Limited use of prescribed burning
slide13

An Ecosystem Management Strategy for Southern Sierran Mixed-Conifer Forests

North, M., P. Stine, K. O’Hara, W. Zielinski and S. Stephens

  • Much of current forest management is focused on landscape strategies intended to achieve immediate fuels reduction (e.g.., (SPLATs and DFPZs). These treatments have largely been developed with a short-term view, using fairly arbitrary diameter limits for mechanical tree removal.
  • We have learned much in recent years, however, that can contribute to re-evaluating Sierran forest management strategies. We believe a more complete understanding of the ecological role of fire, fuel dynamics, sensitive wildlife habitat, and the importance of forest heterogeneity can help revise current silvicultural practices.
  • A central premise of this paper is that the risks of carefully considered active management are lower than the risks of inaction in the Sierras’ fire-prone forest types.
slide14

An Ecosystem Management Strategy for Southern Sierran Mixed-Conifer Forests

North, M., P. Stine, K. O’Hara, W. Zielinski and S. Stephens

  • THE ECOLOGICAL IMPORTANCE OF FIRE: Mixed-conifer forests should be prescribed burned whenever possible. If an area cannot be burn, documenting the reasons for no burning may help inform the public about current limitations and the need for remedies
  • LIMITED USE OF CROWN SEPARATION FUELS TREATMENTS: Reducing crown bulk density and increasing tree crown separation should be sparingly applied only to key strategic zones.
  • SPATIAL VARIAION IN FOREST STRUCTURE:. Produce different forest conditions and use topography as a guide for varying treatments. Within stands, important stand topographic features include concave sinks, cold air drainages, moist microsites. Landscape topographic features include slope, aspect, and slope position.
slide15

An Ecosystem Management Strategy for Southern Sierran Mixed-Conifer Forests

North, M., P. Stine, K. O’Hara, W. Zielinski and S. Stephens

  • STAND-LEVEL TREATMENTS FOR SENSITIVE WILDLIFE: Areas of dense forest and high canopy cover will be needed for California spotted owls and Pacific fishers. We suggest identifying those areas as places where fire would have burned less frequently or at lower severity, due to cooler microclimate and moister soil and fuel conditions.
  • SILVICULTURAL MODEL/STRATEGY: The frequency distribution of tree diameters in Sierran mixed-conifer forest subject to frequent low-intensity fire was highly variable but generally flat due to periodic episodes of fire-induced mortality and subsequent recruitment. Stand treatments should strive to significantly reduce the proportion of small trees and increase the proportion of large trees as compared to current stand conditions.
slide16

An Ecosystem Management Strategy for Southern Sierran Mixed-Conifer Forests

North, M., P. Stine, K. O’Hara, W. Zielinski and S. Stephens

FIELD IMPLEMENTATION OF SILVICULTURAL STRATEGY: Marking rules are based on crown strata or age cohorts (a proxy for size/structure cohorts) and species rather than uniform diameter limits applied to all species.

TOPOGRAPHIC FEATURES CREATE DIFFERING CIRCUMSTANCES FOR STAND DENSITY AND THUS HABITAT CONDITIONS: Basic topographic features result in fundamental differences in vegetation composition and density producing variable forest conditions across the Sierra’s landscape.

  • TREATMENT OF INTERMEDIATE SIZED (20-30”) TREES:
  • In most cases thinning these trees will not affect fire severity and therefore other objectives for their removal should be clearly identified. Silvicultural prescriptions would only remove intermediate-sized trees when they are shade-tolerants on mid or upper slope sites.
slide17

Some plants were sensitive to all disturbances

Pyrola picta

White-flowered

hawkweed

Pterospora andromedea

‘Pinedrops’

Corallorhiza maculata

slide18

Malcolm North

USFS Sierra Nevada Research Center

1731 Research Park Dr.

Davis, CA 95618

530-754-7398

mnorth@ucdavis.edu

Website: http://teakettle.ucdavis.edu