Agenda day 3
Download
1 / 26

Agenda Day -3 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 94 Views
  • Uploaded on

Agenda Day -3. Do Now Gallery Walk-Progressions Let’s Go to the Videotape Reflections. Day -5 . DO NOW Solve the Problem:. Find different ways to solve this problem. A second grade class needs 5 leaves each day to feed its 2 caterpillars.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Agenda Day -3' - anoki


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
Agenda day 3
Agenda Day-3

  • Do Now

  • Gallery Walk-Progressions

  • Let’s Go to the Videotape

  • Reflections


Day 5
Day -5

DO NOW

Solve the Problem:


Find different ways to solve this problem
Find different ways to solve this problem

A secondgrade class needs 5 leaves each day to feed its 2 caterpillars.

How many leaves would the students need each day for 12 caterpillars?


Agenda day 3

Gallery Walk

A Closer Look at the Progressions

How does seeing the progression of math instruction K-12 impact your practice?

Jot down your thoughts / learning in your journal


Unpacking the standards debrief
Unpacking the Standards Debrief

Please share your…..

Aha's

Insights

Connections


Agenda day 3

In Kindergarten, students represented addition and subtraction situations using objects, pictures and words.

In First Grade, students use the addition symbol (+) to represent joining situations, the subtraction symbol (-) to represent separating situations, and the equal sign (=) to represent a relationship regarding quantity between one side of the equation and the other.

Students need extensive experiences with addition and subtraction situations in order to connect the experiences with symbols (+, -, =) and equations (5 = 3 + 2).


Agenda day 3

K.OA.3

Decompose numbers less than or equal to 10 into pairs in more than one way, e.g., by using objects or drawings, and record each decomposition by a drawing or equation (e.g., 5 = 2 + 3 AND 5 = 4 + 1)


Agenda day 3

1.OA.2

Solve word problems that call for addition of three whole numbers whose sum is less than or equal to 20 (within 10)

e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.


Agenda day 3

Example:

Mrs. Smith has 4 oatmeal raisin cookies, 5 chocolate chip cookies, and 6 gingerbread cookies. How many cookies does Mrs. Smith have?


Agenda day 3

Student C:

I wrote: 4 + 5 + 6 = 1.

“ I know that 4 and 6 equals 10, so the oatmeal raisin and gingerbread equals 10 cookies. Then I added the 5 chocolate chip cookies. 10 and 5 is 15. So, Mrs. Smith has 15 cookies. “


Agenda day 3

1.OA.3

Apply properties of operations as strategies to add and subtract. (within 10)

Examples:

If 8 + 3 = 11 is known, then 3 + 8 = 11 is also known. (Commutative property of addition.)

To add 2 + 6 + 4, the second two numbers can be added to make a ten, so 2 + 6 + 4 = 2 + 10 = 12. (Associative property of addition.)

*Students need not use formal terms for these properties.


Agenda day 3

1.OA.4

Understand subtraction as an unknown-addend problem. For example, subtract 10 – 8 by finding the number that makes 10 when added to 8. (within 10)


Agenda day 3

1.OA.5 Relate counting to addition and subtraction (e.g., by counting on 2 to add 2).

(within 10)


Agenda day 3

When solving addition and subtraction problems to 20, First Graders often use counting strategies, such as counting all, counting on, and counting back, before fully developing the essential strategy of using 10 as a benchmark number.

Counting All: Students count all objects to determine the total amount.

Counting On & Counting Back: Students hold a “start number” in their head and count on/back from that number.


Agenda day 3

Once students have developed counting strategies to solve addition and subtraction problems, it is very important to move students toward strategies that focus on composing and decomposing numbers using ten as a benchmark number


Agenda day 3

1.OA.6 addition and subtraction problems, it is very important to move students toward strategies that

Add and subtract within 20, demonstrating fluency for addition and subtraction within 10.

(within 10)

Use strategies such as:

• counting on;

•making ten (e.g., 8 + 6 = 8 + 2 + 4 = 10 + 4 = 14); decomposing a number leading to a ten (e.g., 13 – 4 = 13 – 3 – 1 = 10 – 1 = 9);

•using the relationship between addition and subtraction (e.g., knowing that 8 + 4 = 12, one knows 12 – 8 = 4);

•creating equivalent but easier or known sums (e.g., adding 6 + 7 by creating the known equivalent 6 + 6 + 1 = 12 + 1 = 13).


Agenda day 3

1.OA.7 addition and subtraction problems, it is very important to move students toward strategies that

Understand the meaning of the equal sign, and determine if equations involving addition and subtraction are true or false.

(within 10)

For example, which of the following equations are true and which are false?

6 = 6,

7 = 8 – 1,

5 + 2 = 2 + 5,

4 + 1 = 5 + 2.


Agenda day 3

1.OA.8 addition and subtraction problems, it is very important to move students toward strategies that

Determine the unknown whole number in an addition or subtraction equation relating three whole numbers.

(within 10)

For example, determine the unknown number that makes the equation true in each of the equations:

8 + ? = 11

5 = ? - 3

6 + 6 = ?


Agenda day 3

Example: addition and subtraction problems, it is very important to move students toward strategies that

Five cookies were on the table. I ate some cookies. Then there were 3 cookies. How many cookies did I eat?

Student A: What goes with 3 to make 5? 3 and 2 is 5. So, 2 cookies were eaten.

Student B: Fiiivee, four, three (holding up 1 finger for each count). 2 cookies were eaten (showing 2 fingers).

Student C: We ended with 3 cookies. Threeeee, four, five (holding up 1 finger for each count). 2 cookies were eaten (showing 2 fingers).


Agenda day 3

2.OA.1 addition and subtraction problems, it is very important to move students toward strategies that

Use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one- and two-step word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g., by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.


Agenda day 3

Add and subtract within 20 addition and subtraction problems, it is very important to move students toward strategies that

2.OA.2 Fluently add and subtract within 20 using mental strategies.

By end of grade 2, know from memory all sumtwo one-digit numbers.