slide1 l.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
The Duty of Beneficence PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
The Duty of Beneficence

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 29

The Duty of Beneficence - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 114 Views
  • Uploaded on

The Duty of Beneficence. “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.”. Everyday Ethics What people say. Community. Family. Friends. Strangers far away. Me. Everyday Ethics What people really believe. Some facts:

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'The Duty of Beneficence' - anila


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
slide3

Community

Family

Friends

Strangers

far away

Me

Everyday Ethics

What people really believe

slide4

Some facts:

  • Over 10 million children die each year from easily preventable causes: disease, malnutrition, bad drinking water.
  • 3 million die from dehydrating diarrhea.
  • Treatment: a packet of oral rehydration salts. Cost: 15 cents each.
slide5

1 million die from measles

  • One effective treatment, even for kids who haven’t been vaccinated: Vitamin A capsules. Cost: 10 cents each.
  • 3.5 die from pneumonia
  • Treatment: antibiotics Cost: 25 cents each.
slide6

For $17 per child, UNICEF can vaccinate a child against measles, polio, diptheria, whooping cough, tetanus, and tuberculosis.

slide7

But what does it really cost to save a life?

The cost of giving a typically sick two-year-old child in the third world a 90% chance of living to be 21:

$188

Source: Peter Unger, Living High and Letting Die (New York: Oxford University Press, 1996)

slide8

Two arguments that we have an extensive duty to help:

The Child in Front of Us and the Envelope

Singer’s Argument

slide10

The Child in Front of Us and the Envelope

It is wrong not to help the child in front of us.

There is no relevant difference between failing to help the child in front of us and failing to respond to the UNICEF plea.

Therefore, it is equally wrong not to respond to the UNICEF plea.

slide11

The Child in Front of Us and the Envelope

Why the two cases seem different, even though they’re not:

  • The big psychological impact of seeing the child in front of us, compared with the small psychological impact of the envelope
  • The phenomenon of grouping
  • The scattering effect
slide12

Singer’s Argument

If we could prevent something bad from happening, without sacrificing anything of comparable moral importance, then we ought, morally, to do so.

It is bad for children to die from malnutrition or from easily preventable diseases.

We could prevent at least some of those deaths without giving up anything of comparable moral importance.

Therefore we ought, morally, to do so.

slide13

Objection: Singer’s Argument demands too much.

In particular, the first premise is too demanding.

Singer’s reply: OK, I’ll change it.

slide14

If we could prevent something bad from happening, without sacrificing anything of comparable moral importance, then we ought, morally, to do so.

It is bad for children to die from malnutrition or from easily preventable diseases.

We could prevent at least some of those deaths without giving up anything of comparable moral importance.

Therefore we ought, morally, to do so.

slide15

If we could prevent something bad from happening, without sacrificing anything of comparable moral importance, then we ought, morally, to do so.

It is bad for children to die from malnutrition or from easily preventable diseases.

We could prevent at least some of those deaths without giving up anything of comparable moral importance.

Therefore we ought, morally, to do so.

slide16

If we could prevent something bad from happening, by sacrificing only luxuries that we don’t really need, then we ought, morally, to do so.

It is bad for children to die from malnutrition or from easily preventable diseases.

We could prevent at least some of those deaths without giving up anything of comparable moral importance.

Therefore we ought, morally, to do so.

slide17

If we could prevent something bad from happening, by sacrificing only luxuries that we don’t really need, then we ought, morally, to do so.

It is bad for children to die from malnutrition or from easily preventable diseases.

We could prevent at least some of those deaths without giving up anything of comparable moral importance.

Therefore we ought, morally, to do so.

slide18

If we could prevent something bad from happening, by sacrificing only luxuries that we don’t really need, then we ought, morally, to do so.

It is bad for children to die from malnutrition or from easily preventable diseases.

We could prevent at least some of those deaths by giving up new neckties, perfume, expensive wine, and so on.

Therefore we ought, morally, to do so.

slide19

If we could prevent something bad from happening, by sacrificing only luxuries that we don’t really need, then we ought, morally, to do so.

It is bad for children to die from malnutrition or from easily preventable diseases.

We could prevent at least some of those deaths by giving up new neckties, perfume, expensive wine, and so on.

Therefore we ought, morally, to do so.

slide21

The Six Most Common Responses

#1

“Oh my goodness, children dying of starvation! That’s so terrible, I hate even to think about it! Let’s go have lunch.”

slide22

The Six Most Common Responses

#2

“Why should we be so concerned with people in foreign countries, when there is so much need right here at home?”

slide23

The Six Most Common Responses

#3

“Why me? Other people have a lot more money than I have.”

slide24

The Six Most Common Responses

#4

“The government should take care of it.”

slide25

The Six Most Common Responses

#5

“Those so-called relief agencies just waste our money . . .”

slide26

U.S. Committee for UNICEF

United Nations Children’s Fund

333 East 38th Street

New York, NY 10016

Oxfam America

26 West Street

Boston, MA 02111

slide27

The Six Most Common Responses

#6

“The real problem is over-population. Keeping people alive today just creates a greater problem for tomorrow .”