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DQPP Webinar Series: Aligning Degree Outcomes to the DQP Applied Learning and Civic Learning. Wednesday, November 2 0, 2013 9:30 a.m. Hawai’i 12:30 p.m. California Thursday, November 21, 2013 7:30 a.m. Marshall Islands. Presenters.

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dqpp webinar series aligning degree outcomes to the dqp applied learning and civic learning

DQPP Webinar Series: Aligning Degree Outcomes to the DQPApplied Learning and Civic Learning

Wednesday, November 20, 2013

9:30 a.m. Hawai’i

12:30 p.m. California

Thursday, November 21, 2013

7:30 a.m. Marshall Islands

presenters
Presenters
  • Kelly A. Dagan, Ph.D., Director, Service-Learning and Professor of Sociology, Illinois College
  • Krista Johns, J.D., Vice President for Policy and Research at ACCJC and Director of the DQPP project.
purpose of this webinar
Purpose of this Webinar
  • Provide discussion points for understanding the DQP applied learning and civic learning outcomes.
  • Describe the way colleges are deepening practice through alignment of student learning outcomes in these areas of learning.
  • Spark conversations at colleges who are working on projects involving the DQP areas of learning.
dqp degree level outcomes the five categories of learning the 5 plus 1
DQP Degree-level OutcomesThe Five Categories of Learning“The 5 plus 1”
  • Broad, integrative knowledge
  • Specialized knowledge (mastery)
  • Applied learning
  • Civic learning
  • Intellectual skills
  • College-specific area of learning, as appropriate
dqp project
DQP Project
  • A project of the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges supported by a grant from Lumina Foundation.
  • 16 participating colleges (California, Hawai’i, and Marshall Islands) working on one-year projects involving the DQP.
  • College projects are separated into two cohorts: one cohort with individual college projects; one cohort with cross-institution collaborations on identified transfer degrees.
contact us
Contact Us:
  • Laurel Hunter, Grant Project Manager, lhunter@accjc.org
  • Krista Johns, Project Director, kjohns@accjc.org
  • Website: www.dqpp.org
hello from krista johns
Hello from Krista Johns

Glad to be with you all today.

applied learning
Applied Learning
  • Applied learning, what graduates can do with what they know:
    • knowledge and skills from coursework appliedin non-academic settings
    • application of learning from external experiences to work within the academic setting
degree qualifications profile
Degree Qualifications Profile
  • Describes degree-level competencies all students should have upon earning a degree
  • The competencies/outcomes are milestones for students, employers, and transfer institutions
  • The outcomes are applicable across the curriculum
why is alignment beneficial
Why is alignment beneficial?
  • Depth
  • Intentionality
  • Closing the loop
we expect our graduates to go out and use their learning just as we did
We expect our graduates to go out and use their learning --- just as we did!

But our students are expecting….

how do we begin
How do we begin?

Discussion exercise: Consider what is, or, if not yet fully in place, what could be done within the discipline degree program. As a department review and consider these questions:

  • Identify ways in which instruction within your discipline or disciplines of your group uses applied learning as a part of the curriculum. How is this practice reflected in SLOs for the discipline program/degree?
discussion exercise continued
Discussion Exercise, Continued
  • What efforts are made to ensure students understand they are gaining competency in application (in applied learning)? How is increased competency in the application of outside experience to classroom material, and classroom material to outside experience, measured?
discussion exercise continued1
Discussion Exercise, Continued
  • How is the introduction of this competency, reinforcement/development of the competency, and achievement of this competency planned for across courses in the discipline degree program? For students who may take degree courses in different sequences, how is applied learning activity scaffolded within a course to let students gain or increase competency at individual levels.
discussion exercise continued2
Discussion Exercise, Continued
  • Is there an agreed discipline emphasis relative to applied learning competency? How is this communicated and discussed across the departmental faculty?
  • What other considerations might the discipline consider in the area of applied learning?
wouldn t it be impossible
Wouldn’t it be impossible….?

“What graduates can do with what they know is the most critical outcome of higher education.”

DQP Authors

worries
Worries
  • The curriculum is too full as it is.
  • We are not prepared for the changes this would demand of our courses.
  • Are we now going to have to do field trips and other activities?
  • Suggestion:

start where you are

interesting examples
Interesting Examples
  • Social Science Research Methodologies
  • Economics
  • English

Really, the best examples are those which make the applications closest to real life for the students.

For a department, the essential question is: which applicationis it most important for our graduates to master?

how will we know
How will we know?
  • How do we know students have gained any competency?
  • Equally to the point: how do they know?
bringing life into the classroom
Bringing life into the classroom
  • Experience
  • observation/analysis
  • Generalization, principles
  • Application, assessment
why is applied learning essential
Why is Applied Learning essential?

It is:

  • the lifelong learning competency.
  • the test (and proof) of relevance.
  • how students begin to see themselves as managers of their own learning.
slide23

Illinois College

Jacksonville, Illinois 62650

www.ic.edu

il lumina ting the curriculum turning the spotlight on civic learning
Il-LUMINA-ting the Curriculum:Turning the Spotlight on Civic Learning

An Overview of Work Engaged in and Presented by:

Karen E. Dean,

Director, Illinois College

Leadership Program

Kelly A. Dagan,

Director, Service-Learning and Professor of Sociology

Originally Developed For the Annual Meeting of the

Higher Learning Commission

Chicago: April 2013

the illinois college mission statement
The Illinois College Mission Statement

True to its founding vision in 1829, Illinois College is a community committed to the highest standards of scholarship and integrity in the liberal arts. The College develops in its students qualities of mind and character needed for fulfilling lives of leadership and service.

perfect timing
Perfect Timing

The BLUEprint

A revision of IC’s general education program to be mission driven

Realizing the Vision

A Board of Trustees mandate to identify the most important aspects of IC’s strategic plan

The Leadership Program and Service-Learning

A commitment of both human and financial resources to live the mission of IC

civic learning across the curriculum
Civic Learning Across the Curriculum

IC Connections Program

All first year students engage in a common service event that is then linked to a common reading in their first year seminar courses, transforming a stand-alone service blitz to service-learning.

civic learning across the curriculum2
Civic Learning Across the Curriculum

Meaningful Leadership in a Democracy

This is an interdisciplinary course that requires students to participate in a reading program, linking the college students to at-risk elementary students in the school with the highest level of poverty in the community.

civic learning across the curriculum3
Civic Learning Across the Curriculum

Social Stratification

This is a sociology course that is wholly designed as a service-learning course, where students serve at a non-profit agency for a minimum of forty hours over the course of the semester while continually reflecting on those experiences.

civic learning across the curriculum4
Civic Learning Across the Curriculum

The Art of Service

Art students created a logo for the Sonya Project (a reading/mentorship program through our local school district). Art students also created the logo and pieces of art for a local homeless shelter.

civic learning across the curriculum5
Civic Learning Across the Curriculum

Service as Science

Biology students baked and decorated cookies to look like the HIV/AIDS virus and other cells. The students attached information about HIV/AIDS. They then sold the cookies and donated the money to HIV/AIDS research.

continued institutional support
CONTINUED INSTITUTIONAL SUPPORT

Summer Workshops

Curriculum Committee has signed on

Increased accountability expectations

more questions can i be of help
More Questions?Can I Be of Help?

Don’t hesitate to contact me:

Kelly Dagan, kdagan@mail.ic.edu

217-245-3442

civic learning
Civic Learning

Civic Learning: Understanding oneself in relation to others in a civil society; developing readiness for and acceptance of each person’s obligation to contribute to their community.

response to we re already there
Response to: “We’re already there.”
  • Is not, at the core, about elections, how government works, or key political milestones for our nation
  • Key human development stage for college students
  • Imbues each learner’s preparation with significance
  • Is the responsibility of every discipline
civic learning outcomes
Civic Learning- Outcomes

The student is able to:

  • Describe his or her own civic and cultural background, including origins, development, assumptions and predispositions.
  • Describe historical and contemporary positions on democratic values and practices, and presents his or her position on a related problem.
  • Take an active role in the community (work, service, co-curricular activities) and examine civic issues encountered and insights gained.
why the dqp
Why the DQP?
  • The framework can move conversation beyond process and format to content more quickly.
  • It provides a means for identifying possible gaps in existing degree level outcomes.
  • The categories of learning and levels of outcomes offer examination and comparison outside the department and college.
contact us1
Contact Us:
  • Laurel Hunter, Grant Project Manager, lhunter@accjc.org
  • Krista Johns, Project Director, kjohns@accjc.org
  • Website: www.dqpp.org