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Writing a Literary Analysis Essay. A FEW pointers……. Writing Mini Lesson #2 (Quote Integration, Thesis creation, and Organization!). Quote Integration (MLA Format) . Find the quote from the text that you want to use. Decide whether you want to PARAPHRASE or QUOTE it.

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Writing a Literary Analysis Essay


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    1. Writing a Literary Analysis Essay • A FEW pointers……. • Writing Mini Lesson #2 (Quote Integration, Thesis creation, and Organization!)

    2. Quote Integration (MLA Format) • Find the quote from the text that you want to use. • Decide whether you want to PARAPHRASE or QUOTE it.

    3. What it means to Paraphrase • Paraphrase= put it in your OWN words! • Note: you still need to cite even if you paraphrase. • Ex. “The door of the jail being flung open from within, there appeared, in the first place, like a black shadow emerging into the sunshine, the grime and grisley presence of the town-beadle with a sword by his side and his staffo of office in his hand”(49).

    4. NOT paraphrased • “The door of the jail being flung open from within, there appeared, in the first place, like a black shadow emerging into the sunshine, the grime and grisley presence of the town-beadle with a sword by his side and his staff of office in his hand”(49). • The door of the jail was flung open from the inside, and like a black shadow emerging into the sunshine, the grim presence of the beadle appeared with a staff and sword.

    5. Paraphrased • “The door of the jail being flung open from within, there appeared, in the first place, like a black shadow emerging into the sunshine, the grime and grisley presence of the town-beadle with a sword by his side and his staff of office in his hand”(49). • The town beadle opened the door of the jail and stepped into the sunshine, holding a sword and staff (49).

    6. Citing • Quote: anything you take from a text, not just talking. • Put quotes in “quotes.” • If you have a speaker, put the spoken words in ‘quotes’ surrounded by “quotes.” • E.g. “Daniel said, ‘Hey Ms. Dobbs.’ She looked up.”

    7. More Citing • MLA Format for quotes blended into your written text. • “Quote”(48). • “Quote!”(48). • “Quote?”(48). • “Quote.” (48). IS NOT APPROPRIATE

    8. Interpolation • What if the quote is really long, but you only need parts of it? • Use Interpolation….. • … (you’ve skipped a portion of the sentence) • …. (you’ve skipped sentences) • E.g. “There she beheld another countenance…This figure…was slightly deformed”(55). • Do not interpolate at the beginning or ending of a sentence

    9. Integrating Quotes: 1. Avoid the Hail Mary Bomb! • Despite my never ending love of football, throwing quotes into a text like Hail-Mary runs is never an effective technique. • Example of a Hail Mary bomb: • I think that The Scarlet Letter is a great story. Hester is such a pretty lady. “On the breast of her gown, in fine red cloth, surrounded with an elaborate embridery…appeared the letter A”(50).

    10. Proper Quote Integration 1. Introduce the quote using one of the following methods: • Sentence lead-in • Combine quote with the sentence • Use a small portion of the quote 2. Lead OUT! By explaining the significance of the quote!

    11. Sentence Lead-In • Hawthorne describes Hester as a regal beautiful woman: she was “tall, with a figure of perfect elegance”(50). • NOTE THE USE OF A COLON!

    12. Combine Quote and Sentence • Hawthorne describes Hester as “tall, with a figure of perfect elegance”(50). • NOTE: the lack of punctuation!

    13. Using a Small Portion of the Quote • Hawthorne uses the adjectives “tall,” “elegance,” “dark,” and “abundant” to describe Hester (50). • Note: the use of the comma, and the page number still goes at the end.

    14. What to do AFTER the quote? • ANALYSIS!!! Why is your quote important? What does it show? (See the Canterbury Tales Sample Paper for an example). • After every quote, make sure you have at least ONE sentence linking that quote to your topic sentence/thesis!!!!

    15. If your quote is longer than 5 lines…. • You need to BLOCK Quote: Type your paragraph, then hit the enter/return key. Indent your quote so that the entirety is indented. You don’t need to use quotations because you are offsetting the quote. (50) Then continue typing your paragraph.

    16. Making your Thesis Arguable • 1. Be SPECIFIC • 2. Be ARGUABLE • 3. Be a SENTENCE (not a question). • Ex: Does Hawthorne uses color symbolism in The Scarlet Letter. • Fixed: Hawthorne uses the color black to develop Chillingworth’s character as a villain.

    17. Organizing your paper • You do NOT have to use a Three Pronged Thesis (e.g. Hawthorne uses the settings of the forest, the scaffold, and the town to illustrate Hester’s relationship with the townspeople.) • Your TOPIC SENTENCES must relate to your thesis.

    18. Conclusion: • Answer the question: SO WHAT? • What can the reader learn from what you’ve told her? • Why is what you’ve argued important or significant?