slide1 n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Sentence Fluency with Mentor Sentences PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Sentence Fluency with Mentor Sentences

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 61

Sentence Fluency with Mentor Sentences - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 557 Views
  • Uploaded on

Sentence Fluency with Mentor Sentences . Containing. Appositives. Get a white board and marker!. Sentence Fluency with Mentor Sentences: Appositives. Read and study— To write fluently with an appositive, use a noun or noun phrase that adds more information to a preceding noun.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

Sentence Fluency with Mentor Sentences


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
    Presentation Transcript
    1. Sentence Fluency with Mentor Sentences Containing Appositives Get a white board and marker!

    2. Sentence Fluency with Mentor Sentences: Appositives Read and study— To write fluently with an appositive, use a noun or noun phrase that adds more information to a preceding noun. Appositive: a noun that renames another noun Example: Bobby’s trophy collection, a mass of metallic men, needs to be dusted.

    3. Sentence Fluency with Mentor Sentences: Appositives Read and Study: Sentence with no appositive— The lioness chased the zebra. Sentence with an appositive— The lioness, a predator, chased the zebra. Sentence with an appositive phrase— The lioness, a ferocious predator who stalks the savannah in search of food for her pride, chased the zebra.

    4. Sentence Fluency with Mentor Sentences: Appositives Read and study: An appositive phrase can interrupt a sentence— Jethro, a hot-tempered defensive lineman, tackled the referee. An appositive phrase can close a sentence— Upset by a bad call, his teammates cheered for Jethro, a hot-tempered defensive lineman who tackled the referee.

    5. Sentence Fluency with Mentor Sentences: Appositives Read and study: An appositive or appositive phrase can be essential to understanding the sentence— The author Suzanne Collins writes with vivid detail and interesting plot twists. (Reader needs to know which author the writer means, so no commas are used.)

    6. Sentence Fluency with Mentor Sentences: Appositives Read and study: An appositive or appositive phrase can be non-essential to understanding the sentence— Suzanne Collins, the author of the Hunger Games series, writes with vivid detail and interesting plot twists. (Reader doesn’tneed to know that she wrote the Hunger Games series, so commas are used.)

    7. Sentence Fluency with Mentor Sentences: Appositives Read and study: Examples of appositives from literature; study the sample— Mom answered the door at 8:05 a.m. to Mr. Bridges, a short round man in a blue suit, and Coach Warner, who was wearing a Lake Windsor High pullover. —Edward Bloor, Tangerine

    8. Sentence Fluency with Mentor Sentences: Appositives Examples of appositives from literature; study the sample— Here and there, the children could see traces of the enormous home they had loved: fragments of their grand piano, an elegant bottle in which Mr. Baudelaire kept brandy,the scorched cushion of the windowseat where their mother liked to sit and read. —Lemony Snicket, The Bad Beginning

    9. Sentence Fluency with Mentor Sentences: Appositives Identify appositives from literature; read the sample— So Cherry Valance, the cheerleader, Bob’s girl, the Soc, was trying to help us. —S.E. Hinton, The Outsiders

    10. Sentence Fluency with Mentor Sentences: Appositives Identify the appositives from literature; read the sample— . I took the pearls out of my pocket, the three milky spheres the Nereid had given me in Santa Monica. —Rick Riordan, The Lightning Thief

    11. Sentence Fluency with Mentor Sentences: Appositives Identify appositives from literature; your turn— #1. Write the sentence and underline the appositive phrase; draw an arrow to the noun being defined/explained. And then I saw the black car, a weathered Ford, parked in Charlie’s driveway, and I heard Edward mutter something unintelligible in a low, harsh voice. —Stephenie Meyer, Twilight

    12. Sentence Fluency with Mentor Sentences: Appositives Identifyappositives from literature; your turn— #2. Write the sentence and underline the appositive phrase; draw an arrow to the noun being defined/explained. The other Soc, a tall guy with a semi-Beatle haircut, turned to Marcia. —S.E. Hinton, The Outsiders

    13. Sentence Fluency with Mentor Sentences: Appositives Combine with appositives; read the sample— She was an infiltrator. + She was a sneak. + She was an ugly. = She was an infiltrator, an ugly sneak. —Scott Westerfeld, Uglies

    14. Sentence Fluency with Mentor Sentences: Appositives Combine appositives from literature; read the sample— But behind him, on a much higher seat in the middle of the sledge sat a very different person. + This person was a great lady. + The great lady was taller than any woman that Edmund had ever seen. = But behind him, on a much higher seat in the middle of the sledge sat a very different person: a great lady, taller than any woman that Edmund had ever seen. —C.S. Lewis, The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe

    15. Sentence Fluency with Mentor Sentences: Appositives Combine with appositives; your turn— #3. Combine the sentences below to make one sentence with an appositive phrase. I knew she was sitting there with Dori Dilson. + Dori Dilson was the only friend who had not deserted her. --Jerry Spinelli, Stargirl

    16. Sentence Fluency with Mentor Sentences: Appositives Combineappositives from literature; your turn— #4. Combine the following sentences to form a new one with an appositive at the end of the sentence. Eragon wove his way between the houses to the butcher’s shop. The butcher’s shop was a broad, thick-beamed building. —Christopher Paolini, Eragon

    17. Sentence Fluency with Mentor Sentences: Appositives Imitate appositives from literature; read the sample: Probably the one with scientific aptitude was Benjamin, the male who had devised new, important equipment for the Rehabilitation Center. —Lois Lowry, The Giver Certainly the one with athletic ability was Jeremy, the young man who had competed at the highest level during the Missouri State Championship games.

    18. Sentence Fluency with Mentor Sentences: Appositives Imitate appositives from literature; read the sample: A glorious racket came from the branches—tweedling notes, peeps, burbles, high sharp calls. —Jeanne DuPrau, City of Ember A tremendous roar came from the sky—clamorous, sounds, booms, cracks, loud frightening thunder.

    19. Sentence Fluency with Mentor Sentences: Appositives Imitate with appositives; your turn— #5. Write a sentence that imitates the structure of the following: From every hill slope came the trickle of running water, the music of unseen fountains. —Jack London, Call of the Wild

    20. Sentence Fluency with Mentor Sentences: Appositives Imitate appositives from literature; your turn— #6. Imitate the structure of the following sentence: When Neville Longbottom, the boy who kept losing his toad, was called, he fell over on his way to the stool. —J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone

    21. Sentence Fluency with Mentor Sentences: Appositives Expand with appositives; read the sample— #7. Write the sentence below, adding an appositive phrase in place of each caret (^). His target, ^, was still with the herd. —Christopher Paolini, Eragon

    22. Sentence Fluency with Mentor Sentences: Appositives Expand with appositives; your turn: #8. Write the sentence below, adding an appositive phrase in place of each caret (^). The cold, sharp-edged rock smell of the tunnel was changing to something softer, ^. —Jeanne DuPrau, City of Ember

    23. Sentence Fluency with Mentor Sentences: Appositives Compose with appositives; your turn: In response to the following picture prompts, write your own sentences with an appositive or appositive phrases. Be creative; stretch; experiment. # 9: Penquin sentence #10: Chocolate cake sentence #11: Tropical island sentence

    24. Sentence Fluency with Mentor Sentences: Appositives Formula: Non-essential appositive phrase as a sentence interrupter

    25. Sentence Fluency with Mentor Sentences: Appositives Formula: An appositive phrase with a series of nouns as a sentence interrupter

    26. Sentence Fluency with Mentor Sentences: Appositives Formula: An appositive phrase as a sentence closer

    27. Sentence Fluency with Mentor Sentences: Appositives Compose a short paragraph about the novel A Christmas Carol. Use a variety of essential and non-essential appositives or appositive phrases as well as a variety of placement and punctuation for the appositives and appositive phrases.

    28. Semester exam is on Friday!

    29. Can you label the oceans?

    30. Can you label the oceans? Artic Pacific Atlantic Pacific Indian

    31. Can you label the continents?

    32. Can you label the continents? North America South America Antarctica Europe Africa Asia Australia

    33. Check your SS study guide… • Bill of Rights • Ratify • Boycott • Integrate • Prejudice • Thomas Jefferson • 1787 • John Locke • Oppression • Jim Crow Laws 11. Reconstruction Amendments 12. Segregate 13. 1920 14. 2001 15. George Washington 16. 2003 17. 1963 18. Equality 19. James Madison 20. 1776

    34. What is irony? http://teachertube.com/viewVideo.php?video_id=247074 http://www.watchknowlearn.org/Video.aspx?VideoID=11851

    35. Ironic by Alanis Morissette! An old man turned ninety-eightHe won the lottery and died the next dayIt's a black fly in your ChardonnayIt's a death row pardon two minutes too lateAnd isn't it ironic... don't you thinkIt's like rain on your wedding dayIt's a free ride when you've already paidIt's the good advice that you just didn't takeWho would've thought... it figures

    36. Mr. Play It Safe was afraid to flyHe packed his suitcase and kissed his kids goodbyeHe waited his whole … life to take that flightAnd as the plane crashed down he thought"Well isn't this nice..."And isn't it ironic... don't you think

    37. It's like rain on your wedding dayIt's a free ride when you've already paidIt's the good advice that you just didn't takeWho would've thought... it figuresWell life has a funny way of sneaking up on youWhen you think everything's okay and everything's going rightAnd life has a funny way of helping you out whenYou think everything's gone wrong and everything blows upIn your face

    38. A traffic jam when you're already lateA no-smoking sign on your cigarette breakIt's like ten thousand spoons when all you need is a knifeIt's meeting the man of my dreamsAnd then meeting his beautiful wifeAnd isn't it ironic...don't you thinkA little too ironic...and, yeah, I really do think...

    39. It's like rain on your wedding dayIt's a free ride when you've already paidIt's the good advice that you just didn't takeWho would've thought... it figuresLife has a funny way of sneaking up on youLife has a funny, funny way of helping you outHelping you out

    40. Isn’t it ironic…. “Irony requires an opposing meaning between what’s said and what’s intended. Sounds simple, but it’s not. A paradox, something that seems contradictory but may be true, is not an irony. The Times stylebook, which, believe me, can be harsh, offers useful advice: The loose “use of irony and ironically, to mean an incongruous turn of events, is trite. Not every coincidence, curiosity, oddity and paradox is an irony, even loosely. And where irony does exist, sophisticated writing counts on the reader to recognize it.”

    41. Isn’t it ironic…. Alanis Morissette’s song “Ironic” is equally useful. If it rains on your wedding day, that’s a coincidence, not an irony. If you win the lottery and drop dead before claiming the money, it’s good luck followed by bad luck. If you meet the man of your dreams and then meet his beautiful wife, it’s a bummer. But if a song called “Ironic” contains no irony, is that in itself ironic? Nope. It may just be … dumb. It depends on the creator’s intent. So, as has been suggested, if Morissette purposely wrote a song called “Ironic” that contained no irony at all, is that ironic? We may be getting closer. Do you know irony when you see it?

    42. “The Gift of the Magi” See if a ppt makes it clearer…. Now, let’s read the play!

    43. “The Gift of the Magi”—Identify Irony Pair one: Jim buying Della’s gift, with a thought bubble showing what he expects will happen when he gives it to her, and Jim finding out that Della has cut her hair, with a thought bubble showing what he thinks about his gift for Della now. Pair two: Della buying Jim’s present, with a thought bubble showing what she expects will happen when she gives it to him, and Della just after Jim tells her that he sold his watch, with a thought bubbleshowing what she thinks about her gift for him now.

    44. In O'Henry's "The Gift of the Magi," Jim and Della were financially impoverished, but wealthy in love. In fact, they loved one another so much that they were willing to sacrifice their most prized possessions in order to demonstrate genuine love to one another.

    45. The central theme of the selection concerns love and self-sacrifice. Either spouse could have offered the other a gift that would have sufficed for holiday giving. However, the sincere desire to offer a perfect gift moved Della to cut her hair in order to purchase a chain for Jim’s watch. It also moved Jim to sell his watch so that he could buy a set of combs for Della’s hair. He knew that she’d admired the set and he wanted to surprise her with the gift. Although neither was able to make immediate use of the gifts, they were both impressed by the degree of love and sacrifice evidence in the purchases. In fact, the author reminds the reader:

    46. “But in a last word to the wise of these days let it be said that of all who give gifts these two were the wisest. Of all who give and receive gifts, such as they are wisest. Everywhere they are wisest.” In this statement from the text, O’Henry clarifies his theme for the reader. The value of the gifts was measured by the loving sacrifice made by each spouse. These selfless acts are priceless, more valuable than item that money can buy. - See more at: http://www.enotes.com/homework-help/what-theme-gift-magi-by-o-henry-281257#sthash.wc3hRRpz.dpuf http://vimeo.com/18010083

    47. Model a great theme essay: Choose a theme statement you like and write a paragraph explaining why that is the best theme. Use text evidence from the play to support your thinking. • It is not the gift but the thought that counts • Giving is the greatest gift of all • Sacrificial love is the greatest gift • Great value is found outside of money http://vimeo.com/18010083

    48. http://vimeo.com/18010083 How does the video differ from the play

    49. “A Modern Day Gift of the Magi” http://edition.cnn.com/2008/LIVING/wayoflife/07/02/hunger.house/#cnnSTCOther1 http://tedxatlanta.com/videos/01262010-repurpose/kevin-and-hannah-salwen/

    50. SSR…Even celebrities have to be able to read!